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  • Mee Magnum
  • December 03, 2014 04:14:44 PM
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A Little About Us

What started humbly as five friends gathered for a night out, has grown to a quest. A Chinese Quest. Follow along as five hungry Jewish guys search for THE BEST Chinese Restaurant on all of Long Island (and now New York City too)! What do Jews like? A bargain AND Chinese food! It started innocently enough. Now it's become something bigger than even their appetites. Or, has it? So, follow along and let's see where their journey takes them in their search. They welcome your suggestions and feedback. And if you're lucky enough, perhaps they'll ask you to join them on one of their crusades! So pack your chop sticks, we're about to hit the road!

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[REVIEW] “You Garden Xiao Long Bao”, Bayside, NY

You Garden Xiao Long Bao, sister Chinese restaurant of Shanghai You Garden Dumpling House in Flushing, opened a few months ago in Bayside. Their reputation certainly preceded them as lines out the door to get a table are the norm every night of the week. Was it as good? What was different? Read and find out! And wait 'til you read what they gave away for FREE! The post [REVIEW] “You Garden Xiao Long Bao”, Bayside, NY appeared first on The Chinese...

The Chinese Quest was extremely eager to dine at the newly opened You Garden Xiao Long Bao Chinese restaurant in Bayside, NY.  This new Bayside location is owned by the same people who own Shanghai You Garden Dumpling House in Flushing, NY.  People have claimed that Shanghai You Garden Dumpling House has the best soup dumplings in New York.  But, the members of The Chinese Quest are far different than ordinary people.  

Technically speaking, tonight was a second visit You Garden Xiao Long Bao for three of us, and Mee Tsu Yan was able to join us to make this now an official review.  This review is an updated and augmented review than prior article.

You-Garden-Xiao-Long-Bao-Bayside-NY

On this visit we came on a Thursday night.  Oddly enough, even though we arrived half an hour later, there was no line outside.  

Free-Samples

Whereas on Monday night we had to wait half an hour for a table, on this night there was no wait.  Though all the tables were still full, and a steady flow of customer came in throughout the night, the pagers were kept in their box to save for another night.

The first thing that you see in the front window is a giant sign covering one entire window.  The words are like manna from heaven.  “FREE Samples”.  Oh my gosh, FREE Soup Dumplings for the table, or a FREE Peking Duck Pancake. 

Your choice.  FREE!  

Making-DumplingsPeking-Ducks

From the outside, You Garden Xiao Long Bao, which is located at 41-07 Bell Blvd, Bayside, NY 11361, looks just like their location in Flushing.  

You-Garden-Xiao-Long-Bao-MenuWhat’s different?  It’s larger.  The restaurant’s capacity is 50% larger than in Flushing.  What hasn’t changed?  The food.  No wait.  That’s changed too.  Change is the wrong word.  It hasn’t changed.  It has everything that Flushing has and more!  More? 

The menu is like 30 pages long.  They added a whole page of Cold Dishes.  Cold Appetizers.  You could dine here 100 times and never eat the same dish twice.

Let’s get down to our chops… as in chopsticks.  Theirs are brilliant!  I’ve never seen anything like it.  A mixture of elegance and practicality.  Instead of disposable chopsticks, theirs are disposable tips!  You get really nice chopsticks, and the tips come in separate sealed bag that contain chopstick tips that you screw in.  Ingenious!  This invention could be right up there with their inventions of alcohol and fireworks!!

Some of the dishes below we ate on our prior visit, and some were new.  We didn’t eat ALL this food in one night.  Though we probably could have!

Service-Without-Chopsticks-TipsChopstick-Tips

Appetizers

Pork Soup Dumplings – FREE!  Need I say more?  Yes.  In fact I must say more.  These were excellent.  And even at their regular price of $5.95 per order, they’re some of the lowest priced Soup Dumplings I’ve ever tasted, and some of the least expensive, if not the least expensive Soup Dumplings we ever had.  And for FREE?  Say not more!

Peking Duck Pancakes – Either FREE (your choice as noted above or $1.50 per pancake (which of course comes with Peking Duck, skin, bun (which was to die for), and all the fixings.  We could have had a few of these each.  For some reason we only had one.  Shame on us!

Peking-Duck-PancakesPeking-Duck-Fixingspeking-duck-in-bun

Special Spare Ribs with Garlic Sauce – These were like dinosaur spareribs.  Fred Flintsone would have given these five stars each.  There was SO much meat on each one, they must have had a Brontosaurus in the refrigerator in the kitchen.  The Garlic sauce made them taste like no spareribs we ever had before.

Cucumbers – They’re cucumbers.  And tasty and seasoned just lightly.  They were served cold as you would expect, and tasted as good as you would expect too!

Special-Spare-Ribs-Garlic-SauceCucumber

Main Courses

I don’t know if we would consider these entrees and the prior dishes appetizers, but I had to split the article up a little bit.

Yangzhou Fried Rice – Kind of like Young Chow Fried Rice, but not.  These was a most delicious fried rice dish and should be ordered whenever you dine here.

Scallion Beef Pancake – Perhaps the only dish that disappointed me.  They pancakes were too thick, and the beef got a little smothered by the pastry part.  Next time more been and less pancake. 

Yangzhou-Fried-RiceScallion-Pancake

Dishes that we had this evening that we didn’t before:

Seafood Pan Fried Noodles – Thickest noodles I ever did see.  I think these out-noodle the Udon Noodle.  Limited seafood in this dish, so I proclaimed, “If you see food, eat it!”  (pun intended!)

Sweet and Soup Crispy Chicken – I REALLY loved the chicken in this dish!  Sweet and Sour sauce can only be taken in moderation or I would have eaten all of the chicken on this platter.  Really.  I could have!  Perhaps with a different sauce I would have.

seafood-pan-fried-noodlessweet-sour-crispy-chicken

Pea Shoots and Garlic – Oddly, this was the most expensive dish that we ordered.  I am not sure why.  It wasn’t the tastiest.  But, I guess the market for Pea Shoots is high.  It wasn’t a total disappointment, and it is good to have ones greens.  I probably wouldn’t ask for it again.  But, it’s nice to try different things on the menu.

Shanghai Sauteed Pork Fried Rice – We opted for a different fried rice dish tonight.  Given my druthers, I would have opted for what we had last time, the Yangzhou Fried Rice.  This dish was on the salty side due to the pork, which was salted.  D’oh!  

pea-shoots-garlicshanghai-sauteed-pork-fried-rice

Grandmas’s Braised Pork – I don’t remember my Grandmother ever making a pork dish.  Who am I kidding?  Of course we at pork.  There’s tasted just like beef stew, but with pork.  And perhaps more flavorful.  This dish went well when served over the rice.  And the presentation was very nice!

grandmas-braised-pork-servicegrandmas-braised-pork 
By this time we were pretty full.  Remember, we did NOT eat all of these dishes this night.  Our review is based on our experience of both nights, and Mee Tsu’s Yan’s on this night.  And THAT is what made this night different from all other nights!

Our Rating:

Rating-You-Garden-Xiao-Long-Bao-Chinese-Restaurant-Bayside-NY

(click to enlarge)

Humbly submitted for your consumption,

Mee Magnum  (“Chop!  Chop!”)

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The post [REVIEW] “You Garden Xiao Long Bao”, Bayside, NY appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


Two Pork Recipes from Chinese Food at Home by Jenny Jade

The Chinese Quest proudly help spread the word about a new cookbook that was recently published featuring Authentic Sichuan Recipes titled "Chinese Food at Home" by Jenny Jade.  Here are two recipes from the cookbook. The post Two Pork Recipes from Chinese Food at Home by Jenny Jade appeared first on The Chinese...

The Chinese Quest proudly help spread the word about a new cookbook that was recently published featuring Authentic Sichuan Recipes titled “Chinese Food at Home” by Jenny Jade.  Here are two recipes from the cookbook.  If you are interested in checking out all the recipes in her cookbook, click on the title above, it’s available on Amazon.com.  

Sautéed Shredded Pork in Sweet Bean Sauce (京酱肉丝)

Sautéed Shredded Pork in Sweet Bean Sauce

【Ingredients】

  • 0.6 lb shredded pork 1 egg white
  • 1 Tbsp corn or potato starch 2 big green onions
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp minced ginger 2 tsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp tomato ketchup 1/3 tsp sugar
  • Oyster sauce to taste (optional) Cilantro
  • Flour or Lettuce wraps

【Directions】

  1. Mix shredded pork with egg white and starch. Set aside for 10 minutes.
  2. Cut white part of green onions into then strips.
  3. Heat oil in pan or wok. Add shredded pork to pan and stir fry until it turns brown. Turn off heat.
  4. Add minced ginger, soy sauce, ketchup, and sugar and oyster sauce to pan. Mix pork well until fully coated with sauce
  5. Put green onions on plate. Place shredded pork on top of the green onions. Garnish with cilantro.
  6. Eat shredded pork and green onions together in a in lettuce or flour wrap.

 


Braised Pork in Brown Sauce (红烧肉)

Braised Pork in Brown Sauce【Ingredients】

  • 1 pound pork belly (streaky pork) 1/2 Tbsp cooking oil
  • 1 block of brown sugar 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 1 thumb sized piece ginger diced 1 garlic diced
  • 5 dried hawthorn
  • 2 star anise (optional) 1/3 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp soy sauce 1 green onion

【Directions】

  1. Chop up the green onions and separate the white and the green part. Cut the raw pork into small cubes.
  2. Boil pork cubes and white part of onions for 5 minutes on high heat.
  3. Take pork out of the pot and rinse with water.
  4. Heat oil in deep pan or wok. Fry pork and white part of onion on low heat with garlic and ginger.
  5. Once oil begins to come out of the pork, add sugar to the pan and stir until sugar is melted.
  6. Add some water to the pot until the pork is fully covered. Add hawthorn and star anise to pan. Boil for about 30 minutes on low heat.
  7. Change heat to medium and add salt and soy sauce. Stir continuously until most of the water has evaporated.
  8. Sprinkle green part of onions on top and serve warm.

The Chinese Quest welcomes original articles pertaining to the Chinese dining experience.  Your article should pertain to Chinese restaurants, Chinese food, recipes, etc.  For more information, please contact us.

Please help spread the word about the cookbook by sharing this post! click-to-share

The post Two Pork Recipes from Chinese Food at Home by Jenny Jade appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


[REVIEW*] You Garden Xiao Long Bao, Bayside, NY

You Garden Xiao Long Bao, sister Chinese restaurant of Shanghai You Garden Dumpling House in Flushing, opened a few months ago in Bayside. Their reputation certainly preceded them as even at 6:00pm on a Monday night there was half an hour wait to get a table. Was it as good? What was different. Surely you will want to read about our new rating system employing Artificial Intelligence (patent pending). And wait 'til you read what they gave away for FREE! The post [REVIEW*] You Garden Xiao...

The Chinese Quest was extremely eager to dine at the newly opened You Garden Xiao Long Bao Chinese restaurant in Bayside, NY.  This new Bayside location is owned by the same people who own Shanghai You Garden Dumpling House in Flushing, NY.  People have claimed that Shanghai You Garden Dumpling House has the best soup dumplings in New York.  But, the members of The Chinese Quest are far different than ordinary people.  Extraordinary?  Well, never mind. 

Unfortunately, not everyone could make it this night which was a great shame.  A shonda!  So what did the three of us do?  We can’t write an official review without a minyan.  Oy!  Being Jews at heart, we did what Jews would do.  We dined.  We feasted.  We just had to post a review to let everyone know of the new crowning Jewel in Bayside.  But how?  Think of the Matrix (I don’t know if that’s a good analogy, I never saw it).  Ok, let’s try holograms.  No.  So, we created artificial Mee’s!  Complete in every detail, and equipped with the latest in Artificial Intelligence (You say, that’s an improvement over their existing… UGH! digression.  Oy!  Let’s get this review back on track.  Hey, we did have half an hour to kill before we were seated.

You-Garden-Xiao-Long-Bao-Bayside-NY

It’s a Monday night in Bayside.  The bells tolled 6:00pm.  We headed over Free-Samplesto the restaurant.  A crowd was gathered.  To see us?  Yeah, right!  No, they were waiting for a table!  Just like in their Flushing restaurant, they give you a pager, and you wait.  You watch them make Dumplings in the window.  You drool over the Peking Ducks hanging in the window. 

You see the sign.  “FREE Samples”.  Oh my gosh, FREE Soup Dumplings for the table, or a FREE Peking Duck Pancake.  Your choice.  FREE!  Jew Heaven?  You wait.  Intolerably.  By this time you’re starving.  Until finally, your pager tolls for thee.  We were going in!

Making-DumplingsPeking-Ducks

From the outside, You Garden Xiao Long Bao, which is located at 41-07 Bell Blvd, Bayside, NY 11361, looks just like their location in Flushing.  

You-Garden-Xiao-Long-Bao-Menu

What’s different?  It’s larger.  The restaurant’s capacity is 50% larger than in Flushing.  What hasn’t changed?  The food.  No wait.  That’s changed too.  Change is the wrong word.  It hasn’t changed.  It has everything that Flushing has and more!  More? 

The menu is like 30 pages long.  They added a whole page of Cold Dishes.  Cold Appetizers.  You could dine here 100 times and never eat the same dish twice.

Let’s get down to our chops… as in chopsticks.  Theirs are brilliant!  I’ve never seen anything like it.  A mixture of elegance and practicality.  Instead of disposable chopsticks, theirs are disposable tips!  You get really nice chopsticks, and the tips come in separate sealed bag that contain chopstick tips that you screw in.  Ingenious!  This invention could be right up there with their inventions of alcohol and fireworks!!

Service-Without-Chopsticks-TipsChopstick-Tips

Appetizers

Pork Soup Dumplings – FREE!  Need I say more?  Yes.  In fact I must say more.  These were excellent.  And even at their regular price of $5.95 per order, they’re some of the lowest priced Soup Dumplings I’ve ever tasted, and some of the least expensive, if not the least expensive Soup Dumplings we ever had.  And for FREE?  Say not more!

Peking Duck Pancakes – Either FREE (your choice as noted above or $1.50 per pancake (which of course comes with Peking Duck, skin, bun (which was to die for), and all the fixings.  We could have had a few of these each.  For some reason we only had one.  Shame on us!

Peking-Duck-PancakesPeking-Duck-Fixings

Special Spare Ribs with Garlic Sauce – These were like dinosaur spareribs.  Fred Flintsone would have given these five stars each.  There was SO much meat on each one, they must have had a Brontosaurus in the refrigerator in the kitchen.  The Garlic sauce made them taste like no spareribs we ever had before.

Cucumbers – They’re cucumbers.  And tasty and seasoned just lightly.  They were served cold as you would expect, and tasted as good as you would expect too!

Special-Spare-Ribs-Garlic-SauceCucumber

Main Courses

I don’t know if we would consider these entrees and the prior dishes appetizers, but I had to split the article up a little bit.

Yangzhou Fried Rice – Kind of like Young Chow Fried Rice, but not.  These was a most delicious fried rice dish and should be ordered whenever you dine here.

Scallion Beef Pancake – Perhaps the only dish that disappointed me.  They pancakes were too thick, and the beef got a little smothered by the pastry part.  Next time more been and less pancake. 

Yangzhou-Fried-RiceScallion-Pancake

By this time we were pretty full.  Remember, there were only three of us.  Plus two virtual Mee’s decked out with Artificial Intelligence.  So, we called it a night.  We paid our bill, the three of us filled out our score sheet, and our Artificial Intelligence Rating Machine (patent pending) calculated what Mee Tsu Yan and Mee V. Stoogas would have rated You Garden Xiao Long Bao based on their prior rating history, taste, personality, and of course intelligence.

Behold the first Artificial Intelligence Chinese Quest rating!

Rating-You-Garden-Xiao-Long-Bao-Bayside-NY

(click to enlarge)

BREAKING NEWS!  This week, we have convinced Mee Tsu Yan to put our Aritificial Intelligence rating to the test as he, myself, and perhaps Mee Gonzi Biao will return to You Garden Xiao Long Bao to make our rating official and to put the Aritificial Intelligence Rating Engine (patent pending) to the ultimate test!  

Stay Tuned for an updated review!

Humbly submitted for your consumption,

Mee Magnum  (“Chop!  Chop!”)

Please share this article if you enjoyed it! click-to-share

The post [REVIEW*] You Garden Xiao Long Bao, Bayside, NY appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


CHINESE NAMES FOR THE CHINESE QUEST

Jenny Jade, author of "Chinese Food at Home", a cookbook of her own Chinese recipes, and a frequent contributor of Chinese recipes to The Chinese Quest, took it upon herself to dub the members of The Chinese Quest with official Mandarin Chinese names.  She was also gracious enough to include the meanings of each name.  Each name was carefully crafted by Jenny to match their personalities and style.  We are honored to dubbed with these names.  It makes us feel Royal. The post CHINESE NAMES...

CHINESE NAMES FOR THE CHINESE QUEST*

MANDARIN CHINESE

中國的追求

Named by Jenny Jade

(*Based on your interests and the sounds of your Cantonese names)

 

Jenny Jade, author of “Chinese Food at Home“, a cookbook of her own Chinese recipes, and a frequent contributor of Chinese recipes to The Chinese Quest, took it upon herself to dub the members of The Chinese Quest with official Mandarin Chinese names.  She was also gracious enough to include the meanings of each name.  Each name was carefully crafted by Jenny to match their personalities and style.  We are honored to dubbed with these names.  It makes us feel Royal.

 

FAMILY NAME:  迷

Pronunciation: Mi (rising tone)

Meaning: a fan or enthusiast (also it contains the character for rice inside it: 米)

 

Mee Gon Zi (Original Cantonese Name)

New Mandarin Name: 迷公子

Pronunciation: Mi Gong Zi (flat tone, no tone)

First Name Meaning: Gong Zi = Respectful title given to the son of a high official/royalty (used in ancient time)

(*Because you cooked for your family your whole life and the royal Gong Zi in the past, ancient China, never had to cook for their entire life, so it’s kind of funny and unexpected)

 

Mee Magnum (Original Cantonese Name)

New Mandarin Name: 迷诺

Pronunciation: Mi Nuo (falling tone)

First Name Meaning: Nuo = A promise

(*you promised to find the best Chinese food in New York)

 

Mee Tsu Yan (Original Cantonese Name)

New Mandarin Name: 迷夙愿

Pronunciation: Mi Su Yuan (falling tone, falling tone)

First Name Meaning: Su = A long time, Yuan = Wish, Su Yuan = A long-cherished hope or wish

(*you have long hoped to find the best Chinese food)

 

Mee V. Stoogas (Original Cantonese Name)

New Mandarin Name: 迷维食

Pronunciation: Mi Wei Shi (rising tone, rising tone)

First Name Meaning: Wei = To hold together, Shi = To eat, Wei Shi = To bring people together to eat

(*you all come together to eat Chinese food)

 

Mee Yong Joo (Original Cantonese Name)

New Mandarin Name: 迷永逐

Pronunciation: Mi Yong Zhu (dipping tone, rising tone)

First Name Meaning: Yong = Forever, Zhu = To seek, search, quest, pursue, chase, Yong Zhu = To quest forever

(*you will forever be on The Chinese Quest)

The Chinese Quest welcomes original articles pertaining to the Chinese dining experience.  Your article should pertain to Chinese restaurants, Chinese food, recipes, etc.  For more information, please contact us.

The post CHINESE NAMES FOR THE CHINESE QUEST appeared first on The Chinese Quest.


The Best Chinese Drinks You Should Try

China has a rich beverage culture of its own, with all the color, variety and flavor you find in Chinese cooking. Here’s a list of some of the best Chinese drinks that you’ll find as mainstays in bars and fridges all across China. Some of them may seem surprising, but check them all out and you might be surprised how many of them tickle your palette. The post The Best Chinese Drinks You Should Try appeared first on The Chinese...

Chinese food is famous throughout the world, especially wherever there’s a Chinatown. Chinese drinks, on the other hand, less so. However, China does indeed have a rich beverage culture of its own, with all the color, variety and flavor you find in Chinese cooking. Here’s a list of some of the best Chinese drinks that you’ll find as mainstays in bars and fridges all across China. Some of them may seem surprising, but check them all out and you might be surprised how many of them tickle your palette.

chinese-tea

Photo Credit: https://res.cloudinary.com/twenty20/private_images/t_standard-fit/photosp/068b17b1-9422-47a4-8590-515debb79a0f/068b17b1-9422-47a4-8590-515debb79a0f.jpg

Chivas and Green Tea

Photo Credit:  https://i2.wp.com/cookmundo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/scotchtea.jpg

chivas-green-tea

This drink is popular with night owls who like nothing better than belting back with late night concoction while providing karaoke renditions of their favorite pop hits for the regulars’ entertainment (or torture). The drink fuses sweet green tea with the immensely popular Chivas Regal scotch, making for a smooth libation with just the right amount of sweetness, and a nice caffeine kick from the tea to keep the party going into the small hours. A regular at any glitzy late night establishment you’ll come across. 

Pearl Milk Tea

pearl-milk-tea

Photo Credit: https://res.cloudinary.com/twenty20/private_images/t_standard-fit/photosp/85e25e20-582b-4bc3-ad43-cc373a925ceb/stock-photo-bubble-tea-beverage-85e25e20-582b-4bc3-ad43-cc373a925ceb.jpg

One of the drinks from China that actually has broken through to other markets across the globe, pearl milk (often known as “bubble”) tea is hugely popular among young people. It’s a combination of herbal and/ or fruit infused juice full of tiny, chewy “bubbles” that are in fact made from tapioca. There’s a huge range of possible flavor combinations, that you’ll find available from dedicated bubble tea bars and elsewhere.

C100

Photo Credit: https://www.echinacities.com/upload/news/2018/02/28/8123964180.jpg

c100This is the Chinese equivalent of electrolyte water like Gatorade that you’ll find elsewhere. There’s a big range of flavors including lemon and grapefruit, and the drink also benefits from an infusion of vitamins and nutrients. It possesses a sweet, tangy flavor and a sharpness to its taste, and remains a hugely popular beverage.

Tieguanyin

Photo Credit: https://www.topteagarden.com/wp-content/uploads/Gallery-Anxi-Oolong-Tie-Guan-Yin-05.jpg

Anxi-Oolong-Tie-Guan-Yin

Tea is a very big deal in China, and tieguanyin, also known under the slightly intimidating moniker of the “Iron Goddess of Mercy”, is one of the most popular oolong tea varieties. Flavor-wise, it lies between black and green tea, with a deep yellow color. It possesses a refreshingly floral aroma blended with a sweet, almost berry-like taste, making for a welcome beverage any time of day. It’s available across the country, but is principally associated with Anxi in the Fujian province, where it’s grown and harvested in autumn and spring.

 

Salt Soda Water

Photo Credit:  https://i.pinimg width='100%' .com/originals/30/af/31/30af31069d30f0a2f010da8bfde1bfdc.jpg

salt-soda-water

Before Coca Cola arrived on China’s shore and inevitably became the most ubiquitous soft drink in the country, salt soda water was the fizzy refreshment of choice for the Chinese, especially in Shanghai. It’s still available pretty much everywhere, letting you enjoy the notes of mint and lemon that help balance out the sugary carbonation.

Tsingtao

Photo Credit:  http://cdn.bottlenose-wine.com/images/full/335640.jpg

Tsingtao

This is the most popular beer in China, and readily available from any chinatown in the world. It’s a lager beer modeled on the German style, with a malty flavor profile and hoppy notes. It’s goes down famously easily, so you may find yourself getting from one end of a six pack to another without even noticing. It hails from the city of Qingdao by the sea, and uses spring water from the mountainous Laoshan area of the Shandong province where the water is famed for its purity. The yeast, barley and hops are imported from Canada and Australia, making for a truly global beer.

Baijiu

Baijiu

Photo Credit: http://i1.wp.com/www.foodrepublic.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/bottomsup_baiju_flickr_flickr_Munkeyspasm_0.jpg?resize=700%2C%20560

This fearsome spirit packs a hefty punch, ranging from 40% to as high as 60% in alcohol. It’s a grain alcohol variously deriving from corn, wheat or rice. It’s the country’s national spirit and can be found pretty much anywhere, and is often enjoyed with food. Just as well, since you wouldn’t want to drink too much of the stuff on an empty stomach.

Kvass

Photo Credit:  https://img width='100%' .alicdn.com/img width='100%' extra/i2/958649186/TB2jWD6jXXXXXXdXpXXXXXXXXXX_!!958649186.jpg

KvassThis amber colored beverage came to northern China courtesy of the Russians in the 19th Century. It’s a sweet, low-alcohol drink (usually around the 1% mark) that tastes a little like a lager and lemonade shandy. The beer is self is derived from black bread or rye, then often flavored with a variety of berries or herbs later on in the brewing process. You’re most likely to find this drink in northern territories like Harbin and Xinjiang, and especially along the country’s border with Russia.

Cooling Tea

cooling-tea

Photo Credit: https://res.cloudinary.com/twenty20/private_images/t_standard-fit/photosp/0eec2718-4e23-4cdf-8aa9-fd5fd0097f6b/0eec2718-4e23-4cdf-8aa9-fd5fd0097f6b.jpg

A popular hot drink frequently sold homemade from stalls in the country’s south, “cooling tea” nonetheless has two mass manufactured brands that vie for the drink’s top spot, Jia Duo Bao and Wang Lao Ji. The drink goes as far back as the Qing dynasty, and it’s notes of honey and mint help explain its popularity as a source of relief for dry or sore throats. 

Cocoa, Cheese & Rock Salt

Photo Credit:  https://i.pinimg width='100%' .com/originals/8e/0a/52/8e0a5228ee9e882c43678f20220a70bd.jpg

Cocoa-Cheese-Rock-SaltOkay, bear with us. Admittedly this might not be anyone’s first idea of a delicious drink, but the combination is evidence of Chinese creativity at work. It’s a national equivalent of chocolate milk, whereby the cocoa, cheese and rock salted are blended together along with a health amount of milk. The result is a rich concoction where the rich sweetness of the cocoa weaves among the tang of salt, offset by the shouldn’t-work but-somehow-it-does flavor of cheese. Try it for yourself to decide.

Chopsticks

Unsurprisingly, there’s lots more liqueurs, wines, beers and soft drinks available varying from region to region, but these are some of the most striking, unique and refreshing worth chasing down to give you an idea of the creativity at play in China’s beverage culture. While imported alcohol and Western carbonated drinks continue to rise in popularity, when in Rome it’s always a better idea to sample the locally made hooch, and you may be able to enjoy some of these outside the country at your local Chinese restaurant as well. Ganbei!

William BenettonAbout the Author:

William Benetton is a writer, traveler, photographer, and a fan of sport. William loves webdesign and around six months ago he has created his first project. William cannot live without sweet coffee every morning.

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5 Ways to Taste Wine Properly

Many of us search for definite ways to taste wine in the proper fashion. Guest author Harold Camaya share his expertise with this article on 5 ways to taste wine properly. Take a sip and taste like a pro after reading this article. The post 5 Ways to Taste Wine Properly appeared first on The Chinese...

As many of you know, we love to enjoy some wine at times when we are eating Chinese food, so we invited a wine expert, Harold Camaya, to write an article on the proper ways to taste wine.  Here is what Harold wrote for us: “5 Ways to Taste Wine Properly”.

Many of us search for definite ways to taste wine in the proper fashion. Not only does that help us in enhancing our overall experience but also allows us to explore more about the wine. Since wine tasting is no less than an art you acquire, it is necessary we follow the correct ways to evaluate the wine comprehensively. No longer do you have to behold a drink without knowing its nature. This article shall thus provide you with a slew of tips to taste your wine the right way for the next time you have it.

wine-tasting

Photo by Zachariah Hagy on Unsplash

Make the conditions right

It is an absolute necessity to maintain a conducive surrounding and conditions before you go on to taste your wine. Keep it devoid of any sort of scents, smells and noises around you in the background. This shall ensure that your concentration remains unwavering and all the senses remain at rest. The temperature of the wine also plays a vital role in having an insight into it. Although drinks like Corralejo tequila and Laphroaig 18 taste best when chilled, make sure your wine remains warm during the process. Stir it a bit before you go on to have a sip.

Pouring of the wine

Contrary to the popular belief, how you pour your wine into the glass is as important a step as any. This allows for the texture of the wine to remain intact throughout. Cleanse the glass properly. Bend the rim of the glass inwards and pour the wine into the glass slowly for the aromas to reach your nose. An inch of wine in the glass would be well enough.

Sight assessment

Once your glass of wine is filled, it is now time to evaluate it. Tilt the glass a bit for the wine to become thinner as it comes towards the edges. Look down on it to have a sense of its depth and consistency. Thicker wine is indicative of its age and good quality. Further, hold the glass straight and have a look at it against some light. This allows for knowing how clear, harmonious and unfiltered the wine is.

Evaluation by sniffing

On having a good look at the wine, it is now the time to assess the aromas of it. Swirl the glass a bit and take in short breaths of the wine as you sniff from the rim of the glass. This can enable you to ascertain the character of the wine effectively. Not only does the aroma help in knowing about the age of the wine, but also aids in knowing all the flavors of the fruits and flora that are in it.

Having a taste

It is now the time to take a sip of the wine. Take a slow sip off the glass as you allow it to circulate in your mouth. This shall give you a comprehensive idea about the fruits and flavors added to the wine. Besides, tasting the wine can inform us as to how balanced, harmonious and complete the wine is. Try not to swallow it if you have to taste a range of wines and spit it out into a vessel. Well-blended and integrated wine suggests the quality of the wine. Don’t forget to pop out a cigar from your cigar humidor cabinet for a wonderful experience to go along with the wine.

Known to grow the good quality of grapes, wines prepared in China are fast gaining a huge market nowadays. It is thus on its way to becoming one of the primary producers of wine in the world. Since you are now aware of the ways to taste your wine, give these a try the next time you indulge in it to have best of experience.

Author Bio:

Harold Camaya

Harold is a blogger who loves to write in different verticals. Harold co-authored Supercharge Organic Traffic: A popular course focusing on Organic Traffic for Ecommerce. Harold’s hobbies are travelling and reading novels.

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