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Blog Description:

All the best drone information on the web. Drones, UAVs, Quadcopters, and more.
Blog Added: March 20, 2015 09:42:10 PM
Audience Rating: General Audience
Blog Platform: WordPress
Blog Country: United-States   United-States
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Blog Rating: 3.09
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Nesta’s Flying High Challenge is Delivering on Drone Advancement

While there’s still no shortage of search engine queries referencing public concern and distaste for the growing popularity of drones, it seems for now, as drone advancements and innovation continue to boom, these questions and related scare stories are getting far and fewer in between on this list of sought-out, drone information. Squashing Fears of Drone Use : The Flying High Challenge We can thank, in part, large companies like Amazon and Walmart, as well as smaller organizations like...

While there’s still no shortage of search engine queries referencing public concern and distaste for the growing popularity of drones, it seems for now, as drone advancements and innovation continue to boom, these questions and related scare stories are getting far and fewer in between on this list of sought-out, drone information.

Squashing Fears of Drone Use : The Flying High Challenge

We can thank, in part, large companies like Amazon and Walmart, as well as smaller organizations like real estate agencies and farms who are cashing in on the amazing benefits and precision that drones offer their businesses. These commercial drone applications are seemingly normalizing drone use and exciting the public in its advancement. With such development, questions related to fulfilling public and commercial needs have appeared on the horizon, so it’s not much of a surprise to see the recently launched project, Flying High Challenge. In our books, it was inevitable.

Drones Solving Public Problems

Five UK cities are taking on the challenge with the sole mission of targeting resolution to city-related challenges, business advancements, public services, and more, with each city focusing on a specific drone-use, case study.

“The programme has picked out 13 examples of key use cases of drones that cities may wish to consider. These are: monitoring air pollution; mapping fires; exploring hazardous environments; inspecting large infrastructure; upgrading road networks; delivering goods; transporting people; boosting mobile networks; managing marine ports; overseeing construction sites; responding to traffic accidents; maintaining utilities; and supplying hospitals.”

Programs like Nesta’s Flying High Challenge are not only squashing fears of drone use in the public sector, they’re encouraging both private and commercial users to seek new ways to fulfill their needs with drones. The innovation and excitement that seems to be lacking in America can hopefully take a cue from the desperate advancements we’re seeing from across the pond.

To learn about the Flying High Challenge visit www.publictechnology.net for more info.

The post Nesta’s Flying High Challenge is Delivering on Drone Advancement appeared first on .



Top Industries Take on Private Unmanned Traffic Management System

Tackling the Unmanned Traffic Management System With drone delivery dreams soaring high and motivating quickly planned innovations, the top dogs of industry (Amazon, Boeing, GE, and Google) are taking on the developmental quagmire of an Unmanned Traffic Management system (UTM). The possible predicaments are obvious and plentiful but begin with inevitable drone crashes and manned aircraft interference. NASA on Air Traffic To tackle the basics and make their drone delivery technology a reality,...

Tackling the Unmanned Traffic Management System

With drone delivery dreams soaring high and motivating quickly planned innovations, the top dogs of industry (Amazon, Boeing, GE, and Google) are taking on the developmental quagmire of an Unmanned Traffic Management system (UTM). The possible predicaments are obvious and plentiful but begin with inevitable drone crashes and manned aircraft interference.

NASA on Air Traffic

To tackle the basics and make their drone delivery technology a reality, these tech giants will be leaning on the broad and experienced shoulders of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). This unstoppable force of major players plans to approach their goals with a “totally different, new way of doing things” beginning with exclusionary development that removes any and all influence of the FAA’s pre-existing radars and controllers.

Development Timing

While discussions are fast-fueled and the topic of advancement is hot, we still have a few years until we can even catch a small a glimpse of results. Not only is this technology “basically off the shelf,” growing drone popularity, unmanned transportation, and slow FAA actions are just a scratch on the surface of problems that need some serious solving. With a slow start and a simplified approach planned, it’s safe to say, drone deliveries won’t become the commercial norm at a rate that boggles the mind. There’s no doubt this highly anticipated Unmanned Traffic Management System brings pros as well as ample cons to the table, but regardless, we’re all anxious to witness the vast development wonders ahead for the drone Industry.

To learn about Amazon’s, Boeing’s, GE’s, Google’s, and NASA’s development plans for an Unmanned Traffic Management System, visit www.geospatialworld.net for more info.

The post Top Industries Take on Private Unmanned Traffic Management System appeared first on .



How Americans Really Feel About Drones

(Credit: Shutterstock) If you’re a fan of drone technology or a drone pilot yourself, it’s easy to think the tech is mainstream. It’s not. And it turns out drone owners are just a small sliver of Americans — just 8 percent own a flying drone, according to a December 2017 study from Pew Research Center. Even though many people don’t own drones, almost 60 percent have seen someone operating one. As of January, more than 1 million people have registered as drone owners with the FAA. That...

(Credit: Shutterstock) If you’re a fan of drone technology or a drone pilot yourself, it’s easy to think the tech is mainstream. It’s not.

And it turns out drone owners are just a small sliver of Americans — just 8 percent own a flying drone, according to a December 2017 study from Pew Research Center. Even though many people don’t own drones, almost 60 percent have seen someone operating one.

As of January, more than 1 million people have registered as drone owners with the FAA. That includes both hobbyist and commercial drone owners. The mandatory registration was initially instituted in 2015 but was found illegal in 2017 — it was reinstated in December 2017.

But How Do Americans Feel About Drones?
While Americans are certainly becoming more exposed to drone tech, they still have mixed feelings about it. The study found 58 percent of people would simply be curious, and 45 percent said they would be interested, if they saw a drone flying near their home. Only 26 percent would be nervous, and about one in 10 would be angry or scared.

In the past, drone pilots have been physically and verbally assaulted when flying (even while following the FAA’s rules, mind you). One woman even stole a drone, lied a bunch and tried to get the pilot in trouble with the police. It’s about a 16-minute video, but it’s worth the watch.

READ MORE! >>

Source: How Americans Really Feel About Drones

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Drone Pilot ID and Drone Regulation to Arrive in the US This Year

During the Singapore Airshow last week, a top official of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) stated that the regulator is planning to craft rules by this year to make it easier to identify drones and their pilots. The rapid growth of the drone market and the rising number of incidents involving these unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV’s) are the main drivers behind the need for increased drone regulation. To draft the new rules, the FAA is working closely together with other agencies and...

During the Singapore Airshow last week, a top official of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) stated that the regulator is planning to craft rules by this year to make it easier to identify drones and their pilots. The rapid growth of the drone market and the rising number of incidents involving these unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV’s) are the main drivers behind the need for increased drone regulation.

To draft the new rules, the FAA is working closely together with other agencies and industry partners, said Carl Burleson, acting deputy administrator of the regulator, during a panel discussion. Adam Welsh, DJI’s head of public policy for Asia-Pacific was on the same panel and also weighed in, pleading for a global set of rules that would save time and could be implemented faster.

Drone identification to increase drone security

Last week during a panel discussion at the Airshow in Singapore, Burleson said that the main goal for the FAA was to improve drone security this year.

“If we were simply dealing with safety, it would be a hard-enough challenge as a regulator,” he told the audience, according to CNBC. “But here we have a whole set of concerns and interest by the law enforcement community, by the national security community.”

“One of the first things we’re looking at, and hopefully get done this year, is some kind of rule-making on ID,” he said. “From the law enforcement standpoint, at least in our country, that’s pretty fundamental. People want to be able to track something — if something goes wrong, they can go back and try to figure out who is responsible.”

The rapid growth of the drone market is creating safety and security challenges that the FAA is trying to resolve with the help of other agencies and industry partners. Last year, an FAA committee suggested using an online database to identify and track drone and drone operators.

READ MORE! >>

Source: Drone and drone pilot ID regulation likely to arrive in the US this year

The post Drone Pilot ID and Drone Regulation to Arrive in the US This Year appeared first on .



Drone Light Shows Look Cool, But How Do They Work?

If you were in Los Angeles on September 14, and looked up into the night sky, you would have seen a swarm of 300 Intel Shooting Star drones, equipped with LED lights, flying in sequence to form a huge W. Despite initial paranoia in downtown that the display was a subliminal message from a more advanced civilization, the drones were in fact working for Warner Bros/DC Comics, promoting the home entertainment release of Wonder Woman. Cool studio marketing stunts aside, you might have been curious...

If you were in Los Angeles on September 14, and looked up into the night sky, you would have seen a swarm of 300 Intel Shooting Star drones, equipped with LED lights, flying in sequence to form a huge W.

Despite initial paranoia in downtown that the display was a subliminal message from a more advanced civilization, the drones were in fact working for Warner Bros/DC Comics, promoting the home entertainment release of Wonder Woman.

Cool studio marketing stunts aside, you might have been curious to learn how drones fly in formation. That’s what PCMag wanted to know, so we went to the first Multi-Robot Systems (MRS) conference at University of Southern California (USC) to grasp the science behind Borg-like UAVs.

MRS is a new initiative of the IEEE RAS Technical Committee on Multi-Robot Systems, and it’s intended to bring together researchers who are in the field of multi-robot systems (MRS) and multi-agent systems (MAS). “Typically MRS/MAS research is spread across large conferences, so the intent of this more focused conference is to bring those researchers together to highlight the best in the field and learn more from each other,” said Dr. Nora Ayanian, Assistant Professor and Director of the ACT Lab at USC and MRS chair.

It was definitely an advanced academic symposium, with peer-reviewed papers presented in quick fire rounds. But the scientific principles were fascinating.

Intel Wonder Woman drone show

Most computer science programming is based on “if/then”—essentially procedural decision making. But in order to have true automation and AI, drones need to get modular, become self-aware, and make decisions based on experience, (i.e. like humans) in their style of problem solving.

Dr. Ayanian joined the Viterbi School of Engineering at USC’s Department of Computer Science in 2013, after doing post-doc work at MIT’s Distributed Robotics Lab (CSAIL). Her work focuses on end-to-end solutions for multirobot coordination, which start from truly high-level specifications and deliver code for individual robots in the system.

READ MORE! >>

Source: Drone Light Shows Look Cool, But How Do They Work?

The post Drone Light Shows Look Cool, But How Do They Work? appeared first on .



Best drones under £100, £200, £500 and £1000 to Buy in the UK for 2018

DRONES don’t need to cost the earth (although the top models often do), so we’ve tracked down some of the best drones for any budget. Below you’ll find bargain drones under £100, right through to professional-grade flyers that cost well north of £1,000. The Parrot Swing has a unique X-wing design, and comes in well below £100 Best drones under £100 At below £100, there are seriously slim-pickings. You’ll either have to compromise on flight time/range,...

DRONES don’t need to cost the earth (although the top models often do), so we’ve tracked down some of the best drones for any budget.

Below you’ll find bargain drones under £100, right through to professional-grade flyers that cost well north of £1,000.

The Parrot Swing has a unique X-wing design, and comes in well below £100
Best drones under £100

At below £100, there are seriously slim-pickings. You’ll either have to compromise on flight time/range, handling/stability, video quality – or all three. But if you’re just looking for a toy-grade drone that won’t go very far, there are still some decent options:

Hubsan X4 H107C (£27.30 at Amazon) – This is a great entry-level drone for first-time flyers, but don’t expect the camera to record any decent footage. Cheap, cheerful, and perfect for low-cost mucking about.

Syma X5SC (£35.98 at Amazon) – The Syma is another great budget option, and has a slightly more grown-up design. It only manages about eight minutes of flight, but has a 2-megapixel camera – which means you’ll get more detailed images, compared to the Hubsan.

Parrot Swing (£59.99 at Amazon) – Parrot is a well-known drone maker, and offers great options for enthusiasts on a budget. The Parrot Swing features a cool X-wing design that Star Wars fans will love. It also means you can do loops and rolls, and hit a nippy maximum speed of 19mph.

Sky Viper SR10001 Streaming Drone (£89.99 at Amazon) – This bargain buy lets you live-stream your footage straight to your smartphone, and can film HD video to boot.

The Parrot Mambo lets you look through your drone’s camera using a VR headset
Best drones under £200

Edge over the £100 mark and you can find a few great steals, although nothing that will suit seriously dedicated snappers looking to take their photography to the skies. These are our top picks:

Revell Control C-Me (£146.70 at Amazon) – This drone will let you record in Full HD, has a 360-degree panorama mode, and has a bunch of camera modes that include “Burst” and “Timer”.

Parrot Mambo FPV (£149.99 at Amazon) – French firm Parrot’s FPV Mini drone is a dinky flyer that comes with first-person-view glasses – so you can see through the eyes of your drone as you fly. It’s also got a decent 100-metre range, and can perform pre-set tricks and flips.

Nikko Air DRL Race Vision (£189.99 at Amazon) – This Nikko drone features a first-person-view mode that works with a bundled VR headset, and has multiple speed settings. It’s also endorsed by the USA’s Drone Racing League, so it’s perfect for anyone with decent reflexes and a need for speed.

DJI’s pint-sized Spark is a real steal, and will suit most casual users

READ MORE! >>

Source: Best drones under £100, £200, £500 and £1000 to buy in the UK for 2018

The post Best drones under £100, £200, £500 and £1000 to Buy in the UK for 2018 appeared first on .



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