Blogging Fusion Blog Directory the #1 blog directory and oldest directory online.

TFALC Blog - The Family and Learning Center

Home TFALC Blog - The Family and Learning Center

TFALC Blog - The Family and Learning Center

Rated: 4.00 / 5 | 383 listing views TFALC Blog - The Family and Learning Center Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

United-States

 

General Audience

  • September 21, 2018 11:33:19 PM
SHARE THIS PAGE ON:

A Little About Us

The Family & Learning Center provides a unique type of one-on-one tutorial intervention called Educational Coaching. Our blog provides educational tips to improve your child’s study habits.

Listing Details

  • Website Tags:
  • Annual Regular Membership: 1 Year Term 2019-09-21 23:33:19 (279 days left)
  • Listing Statistics

    Add ReviewMe Button

    Review TFALC Blog - The Family and Learning Center at Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

    Add SEO Score Button

    My Blogging Fusion Score

    Google Adsense™ Share Program

    Alexa Web Ranking: 14,293,793

    Alexa Ranking - TFALC Blog - The Family and Learning Center

    Example Ad for TFALC Blog - The Family and Learning Center

    This what your TFALC Blog - The Family and Learning Center Blog Ad will look like to visitors! Of course you will want to use keywords and ad targeting to get the most out of your ad campaign! So purchase an ad space today before there all gone!

    https://www.bloggingfusion.com

    .

    notice: Total Ad Spaces Available: (2) ad spaces remaining of (2)

    Advertise Here?

    • Blog specific ad placement
    • Customize the title link
    • Place a detailed description
    • It appears here within the content
    • Approved within 24 hours!
    • 100% Satisfaction
    • Or 3 months absolutely free;
    • No questions asked!

    Subscribe to TFALC Blog - The Family and Learning Center

    Explore the Benefits of Rereading this Holiday Season

    “And the Grinch, with his Grinch-feet ice cold in the snow, stood puzzling and puzzling, how could it be so? It came without ribbons. It came without tags. It came without packages, boxes or bags.” “‘Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, not a creature was stirring, […] The post Explore the Benefits of Rereading this Holiday Season appeared first on The Family and Learning...

    Benefits of Rereading

    “And the Grinch, with his Grinch-feet ice cold in the snow, stood puzzling and puzzling, how could it be so? It came without ribbons. It came without tags. It came without packages, boxes or bags.”

    “‘Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse…”

    The words of classic holiday stories resonate in our minds from reading and rereading the tales with our families each year. Setting up a tradition of reading holiday stories over and over again with our children is a great way to celebrate the season and to develop reading fluency at the same time.

    Read on to learn more about the benefits of rereading.

    Read and Read Again

    Many of us have heard about the importance of daily reading time for our children. For some, curling up with a favorite book is one of the greatest joys in life. For others, reading feels like a battle with their mind — and with anyone who asks them to read. But once any kid has made it through the first reading, we can support her by encouraging her to read it again.

    Benefits of Rereading

    For an enthusiastic reader, rereading provides an opportunity to dive into the meaning of the text. In a second or third time through the text, she can pay more attention to details and see how the author shapes the story through language. Repeated reading also allows the reader to connect with the story and better understand the characters.

    Rereading is an essential piece of reading fluency for a growing reader. Now that she has sounded out the trickiest words in the passage, she can work past choppy reading and into more expressive reading. After a reader decodes a word, she needs repeated exposure to establish automatic word recognition.

    In a review of 51 studies on oral reading fluency instruction, the National Reading Panel found three essential features of improving fluency: reading aloud, rereading, and receiving one-on-one feedback. Rereading to build fluency is most effective when someone provides encouragement and feedback, which is a great reason for us to spend time reading aloud to children as well as listening to children read.

    Finding Something to Read Again

    We can motivate children to read texts multiple times by helping them find interesting reading material. One of the best ways to discover a fun book is by exploring the local library! Scholastic also provides a variety of book lists covering different topics. Or check out Newsela for news articles adapted for different grade levels. Somewhere out there is an engaging reading passage to inspire each student to keep reading.

    The post Explore the Benefits of Rereading this Holiday Season appeared first on The Family and Learning Center.


    Time for Practicing Gratitude

    With an early Thanksgiving just around the corner and holiday music already playing on the radio, it feels like the next few weeks are about to fly by in a whirlwind of vacation days, pumpkin pies, and jingle bells. Here at TFALC, we’ve tried to slow down and spend some […] The post Time for Practicing Gratitude appeared first on The Family and Learning...

    Time for Practicing Gratitude

    With an early Thanksgiving just around the corner and holiday music already playing on the radio, it feels like the next few weeks are about to fly by in a whirlwind of vacation days, pumpkin pies, and jingle bells.

    Here at TFALC, we’ve tried to slow down and spend some time thinking about what we are grateful for this holiday season. It turns out many of us are grateful for the same things: our families, our friends, and our students!

    Having a time set aside for giving thanks is a helpful reminder to make gratitude part of our lifestyle year-round.

    Practicing Gratitude Transforms Us

    When we intentionally think through what we appreciate, we tend to become happier and more optimistic. In fact, research on gratitude links it with improved emotional, mental, and physical states. Brain scans of people who practiced gratitude for eight weeks revealed that they built stronger mental structures for social cognition, empathy, and reward processing.

    When we work on being grateful, we equip our brains for more meaningful interactions with those around us. At the same time, our strengthened reward center gives us positive feedback, making us happier and more productive. Practicing gratitude also leads to greater attentiveness, persistence, and energy.

    This means that we work more efficiently and effectively when we take the time to feel and express gratitude. Other research even connects gratitude to exercising more and going to the doctor less. We can all benefit from practicing gratitude as we work towards our goals.

    Making Gratitude a Habit

    All of us have different natural temperaments that impact how we experience and express gratitude. However, we can develop it just like any other skill. Here are some ideas for how to develop gratitude and turn it into a habit:

    • Keep a daily or weekly gratitude journal.
    • Put a sticky note reminder on your desk or mirror (e.g. “I’m grateful for…”).
    • Write a thank you letter each month to someone who has positively impacted you.
    • At the dinner table, have each family member share something he/she is grateful for.

    Happy Thanksgiving!

    The post Time for Practicing Gratitude appeared first on The Family and Learning Center.


    Retrieval Practice: Embracing an Uncomfortable Study Habit

    None of us enjoy failing. We put a lot of energy into looking and feeling successful every day, and our moments of success motivate us to keep working hard. At the same time, it is impossible to learn without making mistakes, which is why having a growth mindset is essential […] The post Retrieval Practice: Embracing an Uncomfortable Study Habit appeared first on The Family and Learning...

    None of us enjoy failing. We put a lot of energy into looking and feeling successful every day, and our moments of success motivate us to keep working hard. At the same time, it is impossible to learn without making mistakes, which is why having a growth mindset is essential for progress. Successful people embrace mistakes and use them as opportunities to learn something new.

    New Skills Require Practice

    Retrieval Practice

    One of the best ways to build learning opportunities into our studying is retrieval practice. Research tells us that retrieval practice, also known as recall, helps us transfer information from short term to long term memory after we are introduced to a new concept.

    Instinctively we know that learning a new skill requires practice, not just observation. Watching the World Series does not turn anyone into an MLB All Star. Any young baseball player knows that he is much more likely to improve his batting average by working hard at baseball practice and putting in extra time at the batting cages.

    Academic skills similarly benefit from consistent practice. Many students miss out on opportunities to apply retrieval practice because they look at their notes or find an example before trying to recall information on their own. They should flip the order.

    Recall the information, and then check it. By taking one extra moment to practice finding information in their own mind, students can strengthen the neural pathways connected to that knowledge. Even if they remember the concept incorrectly, retrieval practice helps them better remember it correctly in the long run.

    How to Do Retrieval Practice

    Retrieval practice can feel hard because it leads to mistakes, but setting it up is easy.

    Students can tell someone a summary of what they learned in class that day and then double check their notes to see if they recalled the most important details. They can draw a quick visual summary. They can review the main ideas and quiz themselves on the details using Cornell style notes. They can try answering textbook questions from memory before finding the answer in the text. They can use flashcards, create concept maps, or just write out everything they know about a topic. The important part is that they recall the information first and then check their work.

    The post Retrieval Practice: Embracing an Uncomfortable Study Habit appeared first on The Family and Learning Center.


    TFALC Students and Educational Coaching

    What is Educational Coaching all about? It’s about teaching our students how to learn so they can be successful. The skills and strategies we teach make it easier for students to understand concepts for subjects like reading and math. They are more organized. They finish homework faster and more effectively. […] The post TFALC Students and Educational Coaching appeared first on The Family and Learning...

    What is Educational Coaching all about?

    It’s about teaching our students how to learn so they can be successful. The skills and strategies we teach make it easier for students to understand concepts for subjects like reading and math. They are more organized. They finish homework faster and more effectively. They improve test scores. Students are successful because they improve their learning abilities.

    Why do our students like coming to sessions?

    It’s about building rapport and connecting on a personal level so they trust us to teach them the strategies they need. Our students find their sessions fun because we let them be themselves. Their Coaches are good teachers who are easy to understand. We individualize our strategies and our approach based on what works for them.

    How do we know this?

    We asked them! Watch a few students tell you what they think Educational Coaching is all about.

    Are you still deciding if Educational Coaching is right for you? Want to hear more feedback? See our Raving Reviews or watch our Educational Coaching team read Family Feedback letters!

    The post TFALC Students and Educational Coaching appeared first on The Family and Learning Center.


    What Makes Something Scary: Paying Attention to Details in Scary Movies

    It’s that time of year when many of us enjoy a good scare. We visit haunted houses, dress in creepy costumes, and watch scary movies. What makes something scary? From the Stranger Things TV show to The Conjuring movies, effective horror is always about making connections to the audience and […] The post What Makes Something Scary: Paying Attention to Details in Scary Movies appeared first on The Family and Learning...

    What Makes Something Scary: Paying Attention to Details in Scary Movies

    It’s that time of year when many of us enjoy a good scare. We visit haunted houses, dress in creepy costumes, and watch scary movies.

    What makes something scary?

    From the Stranger Things TV show to The Conjuring movies, effective horror is always about making connections to the audience and using precise attention to detail. Critical thinking strategies can be applied to any activity, including making horror movies.

    Paying Attention to Details

    Take a look at these two clips below. One is an upbeat, everyday scene at the office. The other is a scary version of that same scene. Pay attention to the details of the scary scene. What makes it scarier? Make a brainstorm map and analyze what exactly makes that scene frightening, at least in comparison to the first scene.

    There are plenty of details that make a horror movie or even a Halloween haunted house walkthrough scary. One of the most important details to take note of is the use of the unknown. Many horror film directors are amazing at visualization. In addition, they also play around with the concept of visualization. They know that what a person visualizes through the direction of their own imagination is far scarier than anything that can be shown on screen. That is why great horror directors create scenes where your imagination can fill in the blank!

    Critical Thinking Strategy

    Another significant detail as to why certain scene is scary is the set up for anticipation. The critical thinking strategy of making connections comes into play here very well. If you’re shown a dark room, your mind will make connections to spine-chilling things that are associated with the dark. This is a result of what we’ve come to know, through media and even personal experiences, about the dark. What we can’t see is very haunting because we do not know what’s lurking in the darkness, which is why turning on all the lights in a dark room makes us feel instantly better.

    Critical thinking strategies can be used anywhere and everywhere, not just in an academic setting. Contact The Family & Learning Center today to learn how we can help you improve your critical thinking skills.

    The post What Makes Something Scary: Paying Attention to Details in Scary Movies appeared first on The Family and Learning Center.


    TFALC Educational Coaching Reviews: Family Feedback

    At The Family & Learning Center, we are privileged to work with amazing students and their families. They trust us to make a difference in their learning and education. Educational Coaching teaches students the skills and strategies they need to become successful learners. Students learn how to learn, with tools […] The post TFALC Educational Coaching Reviews: Family Feedback appeared first on The Family and Learning...

    At The Family & Learning Center, we are privileged to work with amazing students and their families. They trust us to make a difference in their learning and education.

    Educational Coaching teaches students the skills and strategies they need to become successful learners. Students learn how to learn, with tools that they can apply to reach their potential in any educational situation.

    Educational Coaching Reviews

    Over the years we have received letters, emails, and cards from our students and parents about their positive experiences with Educational Coaching. They talk about how students are more confident and capable, with the tools they need for their future. Listen to their responses as read by our Director, Bonnie Weiss, the Educational Coaches, and our Office Manager.

    Are you still deciding if Educational Coaching is right for you? Want to hear more feedback? Read our Raving Reviews or watch this video directly from TFALC Students!

    The post TFALC Educational Coaching Reviews: Family Feedback appeared first on The Family and Learning Center.


    Link to Category: Educational Blogs

    Or if you prefer use one of our linkware images? Click here

    Social Bookmarks


    Available Upgrade

    If you are the owner of TFALC Blog - The Family and Learning Center, or someone who enjoys this blog why not upgrade it to a Featured Listing or Permanent Listing?


    Blogging Fusion is a trusted resource online for bloggers around the world!