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Where Travel + Street Meet. A personal and widespread look into the world of Street Photography. Learn about Street Photography and Travel the World through the eyes of Street Photography. Join me as I travel the world on different photography projects one city at a time.
Blog Added: May 07, 2015 03:36:14 AM
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33 Street Photography Photos from Delhi, India

Returning to India to cover the last few cities for the project, I started in the north this time in major city #50 Delhi. Thankfully, I had friend and local photographer, Vineet Vohra, to help show me a few of his favorite places and the rest of the time I spent doing my normal exploring and non-stop...

Returning to India to cover the last few cities for the project, I started in the north this time in major city #50 Delhi. Thankfully, I had friend and local photographer, Vineet Vohra, to help show me a few of his favorite places and the rest of the time I spent doing my normal exploring and non-stop walking the city with my camera. A little food poisoning slowed me down some, unfortunately, but I still made sure to push through. “Delhi Belly” is part of the experience here, anyway :) Delhi is big, historic India in all of its chaotic glory, but with its own signature Delhi character and look. Being so large and spread out, it can take some time to truly experience this city, but with so much activity, market life and busy streets, there’s plenty of areas around for you to discover.

So here’s 33 photos that I was able to capture during my time in Delhi…

33 Street Photography Photos from Delhi

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For more info on Delhi, be sure to check out my first impressions from a street photographer’s perspective. And stay tuned for one of my City Street Photography Guides to Delhi.

Have you photographed Delhi before or do you plan on it someday? Let me know about it in the comments below!

And let me know which photos you like best too!

Click Here for More “33 Street Photos” from Cities Around the World   

 

   



7 First Impressions of Delhi, India (From a Street Photography Perspective)

After finishing Ethiopia in Dire Dawa, I took a flight to Delhi, India. While I’d been to Delhi before, and India many times, I’d yet to photograph Delhi for the project. So, after focusing on Mumbai and Southern India’s major cities the previous year, now it was time for a few in Northern India, starting...

After finishing Ethiopia in Dire Dawa, I took a flight to Delhi, India. While I’d been to Delhi before, and India many times, I’d yet to photograph Delhi for the project. So, after focusing on Mumbai and Southern India’s major cities the previous year, now it was time for a few in Northern India, starting in chaotic Delhi.

When many people imagine India, they imagine chaos filling the streets, smells filling the air and honking horns filling their ears. Well, if that’s what you imagine, then maybe no city in India brings that to life more than Delhi. Mumbai and Delhi are India’s largest cities, but they’re very different in character. While they both have that India flavor, Mumbai feels more cosmopolitan while Delhi feels older. Packed with history, markets, life and yes, pollution, Delhi has an atmosphere and look all its own. If you really want to experience India, you can’t miss Delhi.

So here are my first impressions of Delhi, from my personal Street Photographer perspective…

7 First Impressions of Delhi
(From a Street Photography Perspective)

1. Big, spread out city in India

There’s so much to love about big Indian cities for street photography, but walkability can be an exception. India’s major cities are usually very large and very spread out. This is magnified by poor metro systems and heavy traffic. Some cities are condensed enough that you can walk most everywhere, while other cities provide metro systems and transportation that can quickly get you to where you want to go. In India, especially Delhi, neither of these are true so you do have to work around this. Something that doesn’t look that far on a map can easily end up taking an hour in transportation, while walking on foot everywhere can leave you on empty streets for even longer. Delhi is as big and spread out as they come in India.

Fortunately, there are plenty of areas you can pick to explore for hours on foot. So, the best advice is to try not to cram too many places in one day or you’ll be in traffic half of it. I’d pick a couple of places with a variety of interest in the area and stick to them for the day. The areas around Chandni Chowk and New Delhi Station are two great choices with more than enough interest to last a day on foot exploring it all. Hazrat Nizamuddin is another solid choice to take transportation to for a half day of shooting. But I’ll cover all three of these areas in more detail, just continue reading…

2. Chandni Chowk is the chaotic mess you might imagine of India

India is known for chaos and Chandni Chowk is a perfect representation of how chaotic the streets can get here. Chandni Chowk is an endless market area in the heart of Old Delhi. You’ll find packed streets and alleys taking you through markets selling everything you can imagine, from spices, dried fruits and exotic oils to jewelry, clothing and plenty of street food. Mixed in, you’ll find an assortment of temples and the famous Red Fort nearby. 

Chandni Chowk has been around for centuries and you can feel it while exploring through the chaos. The crowds make avoiding messy photos difficult, but you can find ways and spots around it if you try. And for layers and that authentic, lively big city India atmosphere, this makes for a top spot to come get lost in. While it’s definitely packed with locals, it is also a prime spot for tourists in Delhi. You can find some more local feeling markets in the city, but probably not any more chaotic or with more variety to walk with your camera.

3. Less light, gets dusty

Delhi can get very hazy with a combination of thick smog and dust. Much of the time, there’s a brownish tint layered over the city, which can really be seen in photos. The amount of dust in the air effects the degree it’s seen more than anything, as some days have more than others, especially during dust storms when you can barely see through the brown tint. Construction sites add even more to the dust and what you get is something that really becomes part of Delhi’s atmosphere. This means it doesn’t only have to be a negative, as it can become an effect and look to the photos that gives a feel of the city. From distant background views of the city and sky with a layer of brown, or up closer where you still get a bit of that brownish mask. Combine that with how Delhi is already a similar color, it gives it even more of that atmosphere. 

One thing to be aware of, though, is that with that layer of dust and smog, it’s like a constant ND filter of a stop, or more. Even without clouds on a typically hot day, the light won’t be as bright as your normal sunny day elsewhere. So, make sure your photos aren’t underexposed if shooting manually in Delhi. 

4. Hazrat Nizamuddin is an interesting area to explore

Nizamuddin West is the neighborhood surrounding the Dargah (mausoleum) of one of the Sufi saints. The Dargah complex itself has plenty to explore, while the surrounding market streets are always full of life. You’ll find other monuments and plenty of interest around every corner. This is mixed with the local Muslim life filling the streets and a number of visitors coming for prayer, shopping, and popular restaurants. More than just the chaos in the streets, you can find even more interest if you really explore. Children playing cricket, climbing the elaborate architecture or even swimming and jumping into the Nizamuddin Baoli, a sacred stepwell (pond). Local street photographer Vineet Vohra thankfully showed me this neighborhood and it ended up being one of my favorite spots in Delhi.

5. Parks of love 

In India, city parks are always an extremely popular place for young love. While life in India doesn’t seem very private, couples do value privacy and parks are a prime place for them to grab a spot by a tree or behind a bush for a bit of it. Sometimes, almost all you see are young couples sitting or laying around the park. As a local told me, parks are also a popular location for these young couples to skip school and university :) It definitely provides an interesting atmosphere when exploring parks in India, love is all around you. 

In Delhi, they have some popular parks of their own too. Central Park in Connaught Place and Lodi Gardens are two very popular parks, but with different atmospheres. Connaught Place is a busy business hub in Delhi with the circular Central Park in the middle. Due to it’s prime location, this spot is always busy with a variety of activity. Lodi Gardens, on the other hand, is much larger, more picturesque, and peaceful. You’ll usually see some photoshoots here because of it. It’s more out of the way, but provides a much more scenic atmosphere. Couples and friends come here to hang out and take photos. While Connaught Place is usually better for street photography due to the guaranteed amount of activity and variety of it, Lodi Gardens is worth one trip for the change of scenery within chaotic Dehli.

6. New Delhi Station/Paharganj can be a solid area too

The New Delhi Railway Station is the main railway station in Delhi and the fourth busiest in the country. This provides activity and interest on its own, but it’s also right by Paharganj, also known as the Main Bazaar. In India, many people love to photograph the signature train station atmosphere and this New Delhi Station is as good as any for it. After capturing some of the life on the platforms, you can head west into the Main Bazaar. It’s very backpacker friendly here so it doesn’t feel as local as the other bazaars, but it still has its own busy feeling and a mixture of India meets tourism. This means you can find almost anything you want exploring its streets of shops and restaurants. It’s always busy here and provides more than enough area for hours of interest. While the hippy backpacker vibe might not be everyone’s favorite to capture while in India, it does provide a different scene with its own interest, characters and activity. It’s also full of budget lodging so it can make for a good base during your time shooting in Delhi. Two kilometers north of here you’ll also find Sadar Bazaar, one of my favorite bazaars in Delhi.

7. You have to look for character a little more here

Delhi is massive and full of places to explore with your camera, but in a country so full of interest and color, sometimes you have to work a little harder for a photo in Delhi. For India, it’s not quite as colorful here and the backgrounds aren’t always as pleasing. India is known for chaos, but organizing messy scenes is an especially valuable photography skill in Delhi. We’re talking about India, though, so it’s hard for any city to visually compare to cities like Mumbai, Kolkata, and Varanasi, or all of Rajasthan. Delhi still possesses what makes India amazing for street photography, you just have to look for it a little more. Luckily, it has endless neighborhoods to go looking with your camera.

Major City #50: Delhi, India

I’ve explored a range of India over the years now and while I wouldn’t put Delhi at the very top, that has more to do with how amazing the competition is in India. What I can say, though, is that you need to experience and photograph Delhi if you really want to experience this country. It’s too big and important of a city that embodies so much of what makes India what it is. And as far as variety of endless chaos and interest to explore in India with your camera, Delhi still sits towards the top of my list.

If any of you have been to Delhi before, tell me about your experience and impressions of the city and country in the comments below! And stay tuned for more on Delhi, including some of the best Street Photography shots I captured while there.

Click Here for More First Impressions on Cities Around the World 

(from a street photographer’s perspective)



City Street Guides by f.d. walker: A Street Photography Guide to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

*A series of guides on shooting Street Photography in cities around the world. Find the best spots to shoot, things to capture, street walks, street tips, safety concerns, and more for cities around the world. I have personally researched, explored and shot Street Photography in every city that I create a guide for. So you can be...

*A series of guides on shooting Street Photography in cities around the world. Find the best spots to shoot, things to capture, street walks, street tips, safety concerns, and more for cities around the world. I have personally researched, explored and shot Street Photography in every city that I create a guide for. So you can be ready to capture the streets as soon as you step outside with your camera!

Addis Ababa

Overview:

Ethiopia is one of the best countries in Africa to both experience and photograph, in my opinion. When people come to Ethiopia, though, they usually only use Addis Ababa as the big city transit destination. And while I can’t blame them for wanting to rush to some of Ethiopia’s more rural spots, they’re missing out on more than first meets the eye. Addis Ababa is Africa’s fourth-largest city and its diplomatic capital. It might be chaotic, messy and filled with traffic at first impression, but it’s full of life and a unique mix of urban atmosphere meets rich traditions and history that you won’t find anywhere else in the country. There’s beauty and color to be found too, along with the largest open air market in all of Africa. If that’s not enough to make you stay longer with your camera, it also makes for Ethiopia’s best city for a street photography break when it comes to their famous cuisine.

Anwar Mosque | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

So here’s a Street Photography guide so you can be ready to capture all that Addis Ababa has to offer before you even arrive!

Map:

  1. Addis Mercato
  2. Piassa (Menelik II Square / Ethiopian Cinema)
  3. Meskel Square
  4. Bole

Top 4 Street Spots:

1. Addis Mercato

The Addis Merkato, normally shortened to Merkato, is the largest open air market in all of Africa, which should tell you something about its size. They estimate that over 13,000 people work here in over 7,000 different businesses. Honestly, all this doesn’t really help describe the sheer size felt when it exploring it, though. You could spend all day getting lost in its endless, crowded streets. There’s a mix of everything found here, especially produce and other locally grown products, along with specific items sometimes sectioned onto streets. 

Addis Mercato | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Other than size, I don’t know many markets that could match it for chaos, either. It’s crowded, dirty, and probably overwhelming for most, but that also makes it packed with interest. It’s not as pretty as most markets, but if you like action, you’ll find here in guaranteed abundance. I do have to mention, though, recommending shooting here does come with caution. The Merkato is very known for its pick pockets and brings many warnings from the locals. You shouldn’t have to worry too much about personal safety, but not everyone is the friendliest, especially when it comes to photos. You have to bring some confidence and watch your pockets, but you can’t miss visiting Africa’s largest outside market if you’re in Addis, especially if you’re interested in street photography.

Addis Mercato | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

2. Piassa (Menelik II Square / Ethiopian Cinema)

The Piassa neighborhood is probably my favorite area to explore for street photography in the city, especially towards the end of the day. It’s the old town of the city, yesterday’s economic heart of Addis Ababa. Today, it’s mostly shopping, budget hotels and restaurants, but it’s still filled with character from the past. For street photography, it has to be the most picturesque part of the city, colorful old buildings influenced by a variety of cultures. There’s the Italian Occupation’s influence, but you’ll also see Greek, Armenian, Indian and of course, Ethiopian in the mix of flavor here. Cinema Ethiopia is one of the run down landmarks you’ll find here, but all the streets contain similar character.

Piassa | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

In addition to the interest and color, you’ll also find a ton of activity here. My favorite time is around 5pm when people are getting off work. The large bus station and streets of shared vans get chaotic around this time, while the street markets and businesses continue their activity. Combine that with the great light here at this time and the colorful, character filled backgrounds, and you have a spot made for street photography in Piassa.

Piassa | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

3. Meskel Square

Meskel Square is the city’s most popular spot for public gatherings, demonstrations and festivals. It’s actually named after the Meskel Festival, which has been celebrated for over 1,600 years. While it is one of Addis’ main squares, it doesn’t really resemble your average square. The first thing you’ll notice is the crazy, chaotic intersection of traffic that crowds the area. There’s no traffic lights or round about to direct this busy intersection so what you get is a mess of cars going in every direction. The actual square is made up of a large parking lot followed by a wide hill of dirt and grass steps. At the top, you’ll find a popular area for events, but if nothing is going on, you’ll still find plenty of activity along the hill outside of the hotter hours. In the evening it can get pretty busy with locals hanging out and even exercising along the narrow step lanes. In addition to all the activity that gathers here, it’s also a prime spot to catching a shared van elsewhere in the city. 

Meskel Square | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

4. Bole

For the more modern side of the city, and what many locals call the nicest part, you can explore Bole. This section of Addis Ababa goes from the airport, with the same name, all the way to Meskel Square. You can feel things changing fast here as construction keeps building it up. There’s no shortage of cafes, restaurants, shops and business buildings along its main street, along with plenty of pedestrians. It’s also a prime spot for nightlife. Addis Ababa has a strong Chinese influence right now, with China investing in property and businesses everywhere. You’ll see it all over the constructions sites and newer buildings. Bole is where a lot of the expats moving to work in these new businesses stay. I wouldn’t call Bole beautiful or filled with character, it’s more of a concrete jungle, but it does provide life and a different, modern atmosphere. This is where you can feel how much the city is changing. Some of the busier spots are near the Friendship Mall or by the many shared van stops along the main street, especially when people get off work.

Bole | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Sample Street Walk:

For a full day of Street Photography, covering some of the best spots, you can follow this sample street walk for Addis Ababa:

  • Start your morning walking around Meskel Square (3)
  • Then take a shared van over by Addis Mercato (2)
  • Spend multiple hours exploring Africa’s largest outside market with your camera 
  • Then walk northeast to Piassa (2) and walk this colorful neighborhood with your camera, especially around Ethiopian Cinema and Menelik II Square
  • Finish your day in Piassa (2) around all the chaos of shared vans, where the sunlight ends beautifully
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

3 Things I’ll Remember Most About Photographing Addis Ababa:

1. Craziest, biggest market around 

I already went over Addis Mercado, the largest open market in Africa, but a description can’t do it justice. It’s different from any other market experience you’ve had before. While many might find it too overwhelming or intimidating, no one can say it’s not an experience. No matter the street you turn, you’ll be weaving through bodies and crowds moving in every direction, while dodging carpets and crafts being carried on their backs. It’s a constant sensory overload where you have to always watch where you’re going. It’s not always friendly and you can run into some strange characters and pick pockets at its most chaotic, but you just have to be confident and careful when you’re here shooting. If you are, you’ll be rewarded with one uniquely active and large area for street photography. Piassa is my favorite spot in the city for street photography, but Mercado is definitely the craziest. So if you like endless crazy chaos, this is the place for you.

Addis Mercato | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

2. They don’t love photos here, suspicious compared to the rest of Ethiopia

I was warned about Ethiopia many times by other photographers when it came to photo reactions. I was told how I’ll hear non-stop “no photos” walking around with my camera, especially in Addis Ababa. Well, there’s some truth to that. “No photos, forbidden” was the most common thing I heard here, just walking around. I’ve been to my fair share of places where unpaid public photography isn’t openly welcomed, but have learned how to deal with it without much trouble anymore. The same was true here, although, Addis Ababa is towards the top of the list for most hassle when it comes to photos, especially around the main market. Locals have talked to me about it and explained that the city has become very suspicious of others, especially when it comes to cameras. I did notice some difference between areas within the city, though, as Piassa and Bole seemed to give me the least hassle, while the areas around the Mercato gave me the most. 

Addis Mercato | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

I still make photos as I normally do here, though, so it’s nothing to deter you. I just deal with the no’s and hassle, which most of the time are just said without any real seriousness, like it’s just something to say. When someone does come at you, talking to them with a smile is usually enough. At times, it can get frustrating, but it’s just something you have to be ok with if you really want to shoot freely in Addis Ababa (fortunately, the rest of the country isn’t to the same level). 

Near Addis Mercato | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

3. Chinese influence. Construction everywhere.

There’s a lot of construction going on in Addis Ababa and it’s almost all from China. If you talk to the locals, their city is being bought by China, and you can see why they might feel that way. With all the outside Chinese investing, this is starting to bring some influence too. It will be interesting to see how much change comes with this outside growth. 

Bole | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

4. Piassa’s old character

Piassa isn’t very big, but it packs a lot of interest and character. It’s undoubtedly my best memory of the city when it comes to shooting. The colors, the old character, the influences, the light and more make it perfect for street photography.

Piassa | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

3 Non-Street Photography Things To Do in Addis Ababa:

  • Eat: Injera, Bayenetu, Shiro and Tibs
  • Drink: Coffee, Tej and beer
  • Visit: National Museum of Ethiopia and Red Terror Martyrs’ Memorial Museum

Street Safety Score: 7

*As always, no place is completely safe! So when I talk about safety, I’m speaking in general comparison to other places. Always take precaution, be smart, observe your surroundings and trust your instincts anywhere you go!

When it comes to violent crime, Addis Ababa is relatively safe for a large city, especially in Africa. When it comes to petty crime, though, you should be more alert than usual. Around Addis Mercado is a hotspot for pickpocketing so you should definitely watch your belongings there. This market area can be intimidating for many in general, as you can run into some less friendly situations compared to the rest of the city. All in all, though, Addis Ababa is one of the safest big cities in Africa for street photography. 

Piassa | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

People’s Reaction Score: 4

Africa can be difficult for many street photographers when it comes to reactions and Addis Ababa is probably not an exception. It depends where you are, but in general I find it to be less photo friendly compared to the rest of the country too, which was echoed by locals and other photographers. Still, as long as you’re willing to work through a decent amount of “no photos,” you shouldn’t have much more problem than that.

Bole | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Street Tips:

Shared vans are your friend

They’re popular all over Ethiopia, but in Addis Ababa, shared vans run the streets. Nicknamed “Blue Donkeys,” these minibus/vans are like shared taxis working different routes and destinations within the city. They’re much cheaper than regular taxis, while being surprisingly efficient, fast and easy. You’ll see people grouped by the street all over the city, while vans continually slow down or stop, with a man hanging out yelling their destination direction. I don’t speak a bit of the language, but have no problem using them everyday to get back and forth. With a cost of 2-5 birr (10-25 cents) a trip, it’s impossible to beat.

Menelik II Square | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Funny enough, most locals are very surprised to see a foreigner using them, though. I repeatedly get asked why I don’t take a taxi like other foreigners, while receiving surprised looks and smiles as I cram into the van. They do pack them like sardines, but I don’t mind this, as long as it gets me where I need to go quickly enough. While a light rail is in the works, I really don’t miss it with these blue donkeys working as well as they do in Addis Ababa.

Get to Piassa later in the day, around rush hour

Piassa around rush hour is my favorite spot and time in Addis Ababa. First off, the light is amazing here around that time. If you’re here an hour before sunset, especially along the main street running southeast from Minilik Square towards Cinema Ethiopia, you get some beautiful sunlight shining down at the perfect angle. The old stores and cafes are colorful too, providing great backdrops to work with that light. And secondly, it gets extremely busy here around rush hours, as it’s one of the city’s main bus stations and areas for shared vans. You can just walk back and forth through the constantly changing activity and perfect light. It’s a great time for street photography.

Piassa | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Watch your pockets!

Violent crime isn’t big in Addis Ababa, but pick pocketing is. Most big cities are places where pick pocketing is a danger, but Addis Ababa does stand out in my experience. For one, locals warned me here maybe more than any place I’ve been, but their warnings were also validated. I’ve only had pick pocketing attempted on me a couple of times in my life elsewhere, but it’s been tried multiple times here. All places aren’t equal, though, and Addis Mercado is definitely the spot to watch your pockets. It gets insanely packed and there are plenty of people looking to take advantage of the close quarters for some bump and grab. So, make sure your belongings are somewhere safe while navigating the crowded market streets.

Bole | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Inspiration:

For some more inspiration, you can follow the instagram feed of Addis Ababa street photographer Amanuel Tsegaye (@aman_rebel) and look through some of the work done in Ethiopia by photographers Graciela Magnoni and Yves Vernin. And as always, you can check out 33 of my photos taken in Addis Ababa.

Conclusion:

I highly recommend Ethiopia, as a whole, to come experience and photograph, but I’d also highly recommend giving some time to Addis Ababa too, especially for street photography. While other cities in Ethiopia can be more “love at first walk” for street photography, Addis Ababa demands a little more time and exploration. But that’s what I love about big cities, there’s almost always more than first meets the eye and Addis Ababa is a shining example. It brings that unique mix of chaotic urban life meets old, African traditions, and if you want to find the interest and colors that the rest of Ethiopia supplies, you can find it here too.

Addis Mercato | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

I hope this guide can help you better experience Addis Ababa. So, grab your camera and capture all that Addis Ababa has to offer for Street Photography!

If you still have any questions about shooting in Addis Ababa, feel free to comment below or email me.

(I want to make these guides as valuable as possible for all of you so add any ideas on improvements, including addition requests, in the comment section!)

Click Here For More City Street Guides!

(A New Guide Posted Every Other Week)

Piassa | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia  

 



33 Street Photography Photos from Dire Dawa, Ethiopia

After Addis Ababa and a project detour in Harar, my time in Ethiopia finished in city #49 Dire Dawa on the 100 City project. A late addition recommended by friend and photographer, Yves Vernin, I didn’t have my usual amount of time here. So, instead of a full week plus to photograph the city, I had to...

After Addis Ababa and a project detour in Harar, my time in Ethiopia finished in city #49 Dire Dawa on the 100 City project. A late addition recommended by friend and photographer, Yves Vernin, I didn’t have my usual amount of time here. So, instead of a full week plus to photograph the city, I had to get in as much as possible within only a couple of days. Fortunately, Dire Dawa was the perfect city to maximize my time here. Compact and full of interest, life and color, I was able to just step outside and start shooting. With some of the most beautifully colorful streets in the world, a mix of influences and charm, and a one-of-a-kind atmosphere different from the rest of Ethiopia, I have to pass on my recommendation to you all too. 

So here’s 33 photos that I was able to capture during my little time in Dire Dawa…

33 Street Photography Photos from Dire Dawa

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For more info on Dire Dawa, be sure to check out my first impressions from a street photographer’s perspective.

Have you photographed Dire Dawa before or do you plan on it someday? Let me know about it in the comments below!

And let me know which photos you like best too!

Click Here for More “33 Street Photos” from Cities Around the World   

 



7 First Impressions of Dire Dawa, Ethiopia (From a Street Photography Perspective)

After making a project detour in Harar, I took a bus to Dire Dawa, Ethiopia for another major city on my 100 City project. I hadn’t originally planned on spending time in Dire Dawa, but decided to fly out of Ethiopia here and include it on the recommendation of friend and photographer, Yves Vernin. I’m glad...

After making a project detour in Harar, I took a bus to Dire Dawa, Ethiopia for another major city on my 100 City project.

I hadn’t originally planned on spending time in Dire Dawa, but decided to fly out of Ethiopia here and include it on the recommendation of friend and photographer, Yves Vernin. I’m glad and thankful for that too because Dire Dawa quickly became one of the best surprises of the year. Even though it’s now the second largest city in Ethiopia, you won’t find much information about it online. So, it was mostly just step out the door and start exploring for this city. Luckily, the city center alone was enough to spend days here with your camera. With some of the most beautifully colorful streets in the world, a mix of influences and charm, and a one-of-a-kind atmosphere different from the rest of Ethiopia, I have to pass on my recommendation to you all too. If you’re in Ethiopia, include Dire Dawa.

So here are my first impressions of Dire Dawa, from my personal Street Photographer perspective…

7 First Impressions of Dire Dawa
(From a Street Photography Perspective)

1. Great surprise

As mentioned, Dire Dawa was a last minute addition, thanks to Yves, and a great surprise. There’s surprisingly little info online and even google maps is limited when mapping its streets. But with Kezira, the colonial quarter, and Megala, the old town, I had a couple of areas to start exploring for myself when I arrived. As soon as I got out walking, I knew it was a good recommendation and decision. The city immediately felt different from the rest of Ethiopia and stood out on its own. There’s an abundance of character and mix of influences that hits you while walking the atmospheric streets. Dire Dawa just has something special that immediately made me want to explore it with my camera until sundown.

2. Colorful, especially on main streets

Some of the main streets in Megala, the city’s old town, are very colorful. I love color and the colors here are some of the most beautiful I’ve seen. Combined with the great light found here, especially during the last few hours of sunlight, really brings out these colors too. Mixing bright pinks, oranges and blues with shadow and the older character of the streets can make some visually pleasing images. For photographers that like color, it makes for a dream street walk. Dirt roads full of local life set against colors you won’t see elsewhere. I’ve been many other places where streets or neighborhoods are painted colorful, but none as authentic or with the unique mix you see here. Normally those other places turn touristy too, as visitors all come for their colorful selfies, but fortunately not here.

3. Lots of character

Dire Dawa’s old town (Megala) is filled with character and atmosphere. A mix of foreign influence in the architecture, from Arab and French to Italian and Greek. Some parts crumbling and falling apart. Bright colors, dirt roads, signs, trees, goats, donkeys, and people living life outside. A mix of city and old village. It doesn’t feel overly crowded, but still has plenty of  life. Some streets can have a ghost town like feeling in character, but with life added. It’s just an interesting and unique vibe and scenery that has to be experienced to feel it.

 

4. Some hassle, but just roll with it

It still is Ethiopia, which means you will hear “no” to photos sometimes. While not to the degree of Addis Ababa, it was more than Harar. Many people say “no photos” when you’re not taking photos of them, or taking photos at all. I found that much of it was people just giving the foreigner a hard time, though. When I talked and joked back, everything was usually fine and it ended up being pretty easy to shoot here. I’d say it’s best to stand your ground with a smile. If it’s someone you’re going to take a picture of, that’s different of course, but for anyone telling you not to take a public photo that they’re not even in, don’t worry about it. It never got serious and was just part of the experience, many times ending up in friendly conversations. 

5. Kafira Market and Connected Streets were my Favorite

The area around Kafira Market is where I really fell in love with shooting in Dire Dawa. The market itself is the largest in the city and provides a very authentic and local feeling. It’s busy and dirty, but with a special ambience full of interest and atmosphere. From the main market to the venders spilling out on the streets, things are happening all around you and it feels like it hasn’t changed too much over the years. Horses pulling carts on dirt roads by an interesting mix of older architecture and colorful buildings. The large market brings in people from all over to sell their goods here, from surrounding villages and farms to Somalia. If you’re in Dire Dawa, I’d recommending heading straight here and exploring away. It’s a special place for street photography.

6. Chattara Market makes for another interesting market

Chat is a flowering plant native to the region that has become popular in Ethiopia as a chewable herbal stimulant. You’ll see locals chewing the leaves all over town. Depending on who you ask, chat can be considered as harmless as coffee or more of a mild narcotic, but it’s also a cultural tradition. While the government has banned chat houses, the plant has become the number two export after coffee. In Dire Dawa, it’s sold all over town, but nowhere more than at Chattara Market. This crowded and cramped market sells only chat and maybe because everyone is hopped up on the stuff, it feels a little crazier than your average market. It’s not huge, but it has an interesting atmosphere and is definitely worth a stop with your camera.

7. Not huge, but nice compact area of activity to explore back and forth

Dire Dawa isn’t a small city, but it feels smaller than it is, which is part of its charm. It’s actually the second largest city in Ethiopia, with a population over one million in the metro area, but you’d never guess it walking its streets. I’ve never been to a city this size with as little info available on it, either. Google maps barely even covers it. While there isn’t an abundance of areas to explore with your camera, what it does have is packed with gold.

The compact area in the center is made for street photography and you can just walk back and forth throughout it, without getting bored. It just keeps giving. I didn’t come with big expectations, but found something I haven’t found too many other places. It’s just big enough to give you enough to explore, while keeping a lot of it close together, making it a great street photography walk experience. All this with an old, colorful atmosphere throughout the area that is hard to beat. Add this to the unique feeling felt roaming its streets and you get one of my favorite smaller street spots of the year.

Wish I’d had more time here

Dire Dawa is an especially unique city. The atmosphere, the colors, the life, the mix of influences and more provide a city that you won’t experience anywhere else, even in Ethiopia. Population says it’s not a small city, but the atmosphere feels much more relaxed and old world. I wouldn’t say you need a long time here since you’ll end up rehashing the same spots, but those are some photography rich spots. Three to four days would be perfect for most photographers. 

Dire Dawa is one photogenic city that doesn’t get as many visitors as it warrants, which is a very good thing. So, go there, bring your camera, but don’t tell too many people quite yet ;)

If any of you have been to Dire Dawa before, tell me about your experience and impressions of the city and country in the comments below! And stay tuned for more on Dire Dawa, including some of the best Street Photography shots I captured while there.

Click Here for More First Impressions on Cities Around the World 

(from a street photographer’s perspective)

    



City Street Guides by f.d. walker: A Street Photography Guide to Johannesburg, South Africa

*A series of guides on shooting Street Photography in cities around the world. Find the best spots to shoot, things to capture, street walks, street tips, safety concerns, and more for cities around the world. I have personally researched, explored and shot Street Photography in every city that I create a guide for. So you can be...

*A series of guides on shooting Street Photography in cities around the world. Find the best spots to shoot, things to capture, street walks, street tips, safety concerns, and more for cities around the world. I have personally researched, explored and shot Street Photography in every city that I create a guide for. So you can be ready to capture the streets as soon as you step outside with your camera!

Johannesburg

Overview:

Commonly shortened to Joburg, Johannesburg is the largest city in South Africa and an economic center for all of Africa. While it brings a reputation of crime and danger, it also provides a vibrant, rapidly changing city. Within its danger and edginess, you’ll find a friendly and trendy heart to the city.  It’s a big city with plenty to see and hip neighborhoods to explore. There’s no getting around the fact you do have to be careful here, especially if you want to walk the streets for photography. If you’re up for the challenge and know where to go, then you’ll be rewarded with one of the friendliest and warmest big, urban cities I’ve experienced yet. 

Soweto | Johannesburg, South Africa

So here’s a Street Photography guide so you can be ready to capture all that Johannesburg has to offer before you even arrive!

Map:

  1. Soweto
  2. Braamfontein
  3. Maboneng
  4. Newtown
  5. Sandton

Top 5 Street Spots:

1. Soweto

Soweto is the oldest and largest township in South Africa, and the prior home of Nelson Mandela. Formerly a separate municipality, it’s now part of the city of Johannesburg. Covering many neighborhoods, Soweto is full of history. It used to be known as the most dangerous part of Johannesburg (my 50-year-old taxi driver from the airport told me he’d never dared step foot outside there his whole life), but today it’s nothing like it once was. Visitors come to see Mandela’s old house and there’s popular bike tours given to explore the township. I was even able to find a nice place to stay for a few days in the middle of it all, which ended up being my most memorable experience in the city.

Soweto | Johannesburg, South Africa

While it’s still not completely safe, as I’ve been warned about danger many times walking around alone (I was nicknamed “crazy man” after the first day), it’s actually become safer than the city center. And as far as friendliness goes, you’re not going to find many places friendlier. I’m constantly greeted with smiles walking around, many people wanting to talk to me and welcome me to their community. And what stands out the most, there’s a very strong community vibe exploring the streets here. While it’s part of a big city, it doesn’t feel like it. Not only that, but there’s so much life and interest to capture outside here. It feels a little back in time, with a strong authenticity to that I really enjoy. If you come to Joburg, I strongly recommend visiting Soweto with your camera. If you’re worried about safety, at least spend time walking the area around Hector Pieterson Memorial and Mandela’s House in Orlando West.

Soweto | Johannesburg, South Africa

2. Braamfontein

Near the city center, you’ll find Braamfontein, maybe the trendiest area in the city. While it used to be a run down business district, the city has since spent many millions regenerating it into a hipster hotspot filled with students, coffee shops, art galleries, fashion stores, chic hotels, restaurants and plenty of bars, providing one of the city’s most popular areas for nightlife too. It’s still a business district, but also a commercial, entertainment and university hub of the city. Filled with a creative, cool atmosphere, it’s one of the safer spots around the city center thanks to a higher focus on security.

Braamfontein | Johannesburg, South Africa

Every Saturday, people flock here for the Neighbourgoods Market. Specializing in a wide variety of food stalls, the Neighbourgoods Market also has a fun, hip and contemporary vibe. Since it started in 2011, it’s become one of the top attractions in the city, which fills the streets here with extra activity and life on Saturdays, making it a good day to come here with your camera.

3. Maboneng

The Maboneng Precinct has become one of Joburg’s most successful and innovative urban neighbourhood regeneration projects in downtown. While it used to be a “no-go” zone, like much of the city center, it’s now home to one of the safest and most vibrant streets around, Fox Street. You’ll find unique character and a vibrant culture in this small section of the city. There’s a mix of trendy restaurants, bars, boutique shops, galleries, and entertainment spaces integrated into an urban environment. This also gives it some similarities to Braamfontein, but I find a little more character and community feel here, without as much business district feel.

Maboneng | Johannesburg, South Africa

Arts on Main is located here, and houses galleries and boutiques, but it’s also the place for Market On Main, which happens every Sunday. This market sells everything from produce and baked goods to art and fashion. There’s a very creative atmosphere with the people selling their own goods. It also really livens up the whole area, with people inside and outside enjoying the vibrant, active scene.

Maboneng | Johannesburg, South Africa

If you want to venture outside of this small section along Fox Street, it quickly gets much edgier. Locals might tell you not too, but there’s definitely interest for street photography along and around Main and Commissioner streets. And if you’re going to try it, I find Sunday the safest day to do it by far due to all the activity brought by the Market on Main.

4. Newtown

Newtown is the least safe spot included here, but it’s an important one with plenty to see. It’s considered Joburg’s cultural precinct and is located in the heart of the city. While Newtown has been a focus of inner-city regeneration, it still has its fair share of danger and edge if you explore, partly due to its size. Being a cultural hotspot of the city, you’ll find history, museums, art, and diversity. The Museum Africa is here, which attracts tourists, but walking around the surrounding areas, I find a lot of character. There’s street markets, warehouses, a strong music presence, an older feeling and an edgy, active atmosphere. While I definitely had to watch my back in some areas and wouldn’t freely explore the area every day, I was glad I gave it some time on foot with my camera. It provided something different, lots of life, and an interesting look at what the city has come from.

Johannesburg, South Africa

5. Sandton

Sandton is a financial and business district north of the city that’s reachable by the Gautrain, a very nice rapid railway system. Sandton grew fast due to the northward expansion caused by people and business moving out of the increasingly dangerous city center. Today, it is known as ‘Africa’s richest square mile’ and is filled with skyscrapers, big business, and financial institutions. It’s an affluent and very safe spot to come give a visit to see a very different part of Joburg. The spot I’d recommend for street photography would be just outside the Sandton Gautrain stop. Here, you’ll find Sandton City, arguably the most impressive mall in Africa, while also having the popular Mandela Square connected for even more photo opportunities.

Sandton (Mandela Square) | Johannesburg, South Africa

Sample Street Walk:

This city made this section really tricky, but for a full day of Street Photography, covering some of the best spots, you can follow this sample street walk for Johannesburg:

  • Start your morning exploring Soweto (1) around Orlando West
  • Take transportation back to the city center and hit up Fox Street in Maboneng (3)
  • From here, take transportation to Park Station and either walk Braamfontein (2) or take the Gautrain up to Sandton City and Mandela Square (5)
  • Due to dangerous areas, Johannesburg isn’t made for walking everywhere, but if you pick your spots and take transportation, you can make a good day of street photography out of it
Soweto | Johannesburg, South Africa

3 Things I’ll Remember Most about Johannesburg:

1. Soweto experience

As mentioned before, Soweto is the oldest and largest township in South Africa, and the prior home of Nelson Mandela. While its reputation might scare some people away, much has changed here as its become more welcoming for outsiders. This is evidenced by popular bike tours and even lodging options coming to the area. While not completely safe, the overall friendliness makes it worth those risk for me. I have found many places more friendly and interesting. There’s a very warm community vibe felt throughout that brings authenticity, character and lots of life on the streets.

Soweto | Johannesburg, South Africa

If you come to Joburg, I strongly recommend visiting Soweto with your camera. If you’re worried about safety, at least spend time walking the area around Hector Pieterson Memorial and Mandela’s House in Orlando West.

Soweto | Johannesburg, South Africa

2. Danger

I’ve never been to a city with so many supposed “No Go” zones (they even have maps showing them). I’ve also never been to a city where I was warned more by locals, and visitors, to not venture outside specific areas. Usually, these type of warnings tend to be exaggerated to help make sure you stay safe, but Johannesburg’s reputation feels pretty warranted. From my Uber drivers to everyone I met, it usually came up about where not go, which unfortunately felt like the whole city. The downtown and city center of Joburg has experienced some heavy increase in crime, as many companies and workers are moving up to safer areas now. Certain areas and shopping streets will have security out watching, but venture too far around and you will feel the danger.

Braamfontein | Johannesburg, South Africa

I can’t come to a city for street photography and be secluded to such small areas, though, I have to explore the city. So, I make sure to take the risks, anyway, but believe me, it can be a constant rush and “experience” in some areas. You can feel the looks, sometimes being followed, sometimes being asked questions made to intimidate and check you. The scenery and atmosphere can get pretty sketchy and you won’t see a single visitor around. You just have to keep moving and watch your surroundings, or just not venture around as much as me. The metro stations can feel the least safe at times too, especially in the middle of the day.

Commissioner Street | Johannesburg, South Africa

While I wouldn’t recommend it, it does help see a much wider view of the city, which I find interesting. There’s a lot of edgy, authentic urban character to find. It provides interest, colors with darkness and grit, an old deteriorating city from years ago within a booming metropolis. Some of it feeling a little back in time and some of it having a multi-cultural mixture of influences. Of course, most people are fine too, although they will give looks like “what the #*&! are you doing around here?” There’s really two very different sides to this city mixed in together, even seemingly divided by zones. So, I’m glad I’ve been able to experience both.

3. They love malls

When asking locals where locals like to go in Johannesburg, “malls” is the most common answer. After exploring different parts of the city, this answer was noticeably accurate. Joburg is filled with impressive malls. It makes perfect sense too in a city filled with no-go zones where safety is an issue walking around. These elaborate, modern malls provide a safe getaway filled with everything you could need for a day’s entertainment. Shopping, food, movies, and more. Many times laid out in an expansive inside/outside pathway construction where people can come enjoy a day out with friends and family in a setting that is more than a mall. 

Sandton City Mall | Johannesburg, South Africa

For street photography, this also provides some safe spots to come shoot with guaranteed activity. I’m not a big fan of shooting at malls, mostly because of the light, but with outside areas too, I found it worth some time. The massive Sandton City and Rosebank Mall would be my two most recommended. With Sandton City, you get arguably the most impressive mall in Africa, while also having the popular Mandela Square connected for even more photo opportunities.

4. Big, Friendly Cosmopolitan City in Africa

Johannesburg is the largest city in South Africa and one of the 50 largest urban areas in the world. It’s an economic center of Africa and one of the most modern and developed city’s in the continent. It’s a big urban sprawl with a lot going on. From its history and continuing conflict to its prosperous development and future, it’s an urban metropolis with plenty going on. A diverse cosmopolitan mix that is hard to top in Africa, which attracts plenty of people from all over, especially the young.

Braamfontein | Johannesburg, South Africa

In the 2015 YouthfulCities Index, it was named the “most popular African city” overall for young people aged 15-29. It has one of the more impressive city skylines you’ll find in Africa too. So, if you want to experience a big, cosmopolitan city in Africa, this is one of the top places to go.

Within this big city’s dangers and warnings, Johannesburg has a vibrance at heart that is very appealing. You have to immerse yourself into it and look past the negatives to find it, but I ended up having a more enjoyable time here than most cities. Joburg is rapidly changing with trendy hipster urban neighborhoods like Maboneng and there’s an optimism found around the city. Compared to Cape Town, Joburg is commonly known as the friendlier, less stuffy city. And while I found Cape Town friendly enough, Joburg was even more friendly. For a big urban city, I found the people to be some of the friendliest I’ve met. There’s a lot of character in the vibe here and the city buzzes with its progression from past to future. 

Maboneng | Johannesburg, South Africa

What To Do For a Street Photography Break?:

Bike Soweto or Enjoy one of Joburg’s Trendy Streets

Soweto has popular biking tours daily that really give a unique experience, while allowing you to really see Soweto. If you don’t want the exercise, you can relax at one of Joburg’s trendy streets like Fox Street in Maboneng. You’ll find hip eateries, bars and galleries to enjoy for a street photography break.

Soweto | Johannesburg, South Africa

Street Safety Score: 3

*As always, no place is completely safe! So when I talk about safety, I’m speaking in general comparison to other places. Always take precaution, be smart, observe your surroundings and trust your instincts anywhere you go!

Just like with Cape Town, this is South Africa so crime rates aren’t so pretty. Unfortunately, South Africa statistically has some of the highest crime in the world and Johannesburg usually sits around the top in the country. While I do feel less safe in Johannesburg compared to Cape Town, not all statistics back this feeling up. I think one of the main reasons for this feeling is that in Cape Town you have more relatively safe areas to explore. It’s more touristy, outdoors and there’s more focus to keep those areas safer. But in Johannesburg’s center you have big malls and smaller multiple block areas of relative safety, while most of it is considered “no go” zones by locals. Still, while it probably gives the least safe feeling to explore freely out of any city during my project, Johannesburg is doable for street photography and worth the extra caution, in my opinion. I named some of the safer areas above and below you’ll find some safety tips to help you explore the city without as much worry. Beneath crime and risk, you’ll find a very friendly and likable city.

Soweto | Johannesburg, South Africa

People’s Reaction Score: 7.5

According to most South Africans, Johannesburg is known for its friendliness compared to Cape Town. And while I didn’t find Cape Town particularly unfriendly, I did find Johannesburg very friendly. Honestly, it’s one of the friendliest big, urban cities I’ve experienced. This can extend to photo friendliness too. Other than criminal activity in some of the sketchier areas, the people don’t seem to mind photos and reactions are mostly warm, if any reaction at all. Soweto was especially photo friendly, despite its reputation. I never find a problem shooting street photography in Johannesburg, you just have to watch out for who you’re photographing and you shouldn’t find a problem, either. As far as the African continent goes, this is about as good as it gets for street photography reactions.

Johannesburg, South Africa

Street Tips:

1. City center is the most dangerous feeling I’ve been to, safety tips

With warnings kept in mind, I still did my best to explore Johannesburg on foot and camera in hand. I didn’t make it out without any problems, but I did make it out with my camera so if you want to risk it like me, here’s a few safety tips I can give for shooting in Johannesburg.

a. Keep notice of security guards

This is my best advice for visitors who don’t want to take many risks, but still want to shoot in Joburg. Security is a popular profession in Joburg. Many stores and restaurants will hire security to sit outside their business, while you’ll also find hired security working corners and streets in nicer areas. These are your safest spots to shoot. Fox Street in Maboneng and Braamfontein around Neighborhoods Market are a couple active and interesting spots where you’ll find solid pockets of security. Just be aware when security becomes out of sight.

b. Keep a plastic shopping bag in your pocket

When you feel you’re walking through more dangerous areas, carry your camera in a plastic shopping bag. You’re much more likely to get mugged if you look like you might have something valuable. A plastic market bag will get little care compared to a real camera bag.

Soweto | Johannesburg, South Africa

c. Constantly scan your surroundings

Notice bad body language and look for anyone that seems overly interested in you. Joburg isn’t a place where they’re naturally over-curious about foreigners. 

d. Make sure to keep distance between people

While remembering faces, notice if someone seems to be getting closer to you. Don’t let yourself be open to be cornered so keep on the outside of sidewalks and cross the street if someone crosses the street towards you.

e. Know where you are and what safe spots are nearby

When going from one busy area towards another, you’ll probably cross some sketchy, quieter areas. These are the most dangerous so move fast and know where to run if needed.

f. Run if needed

I’ve had to twice. Don’t wait until you know something’s wrong. If you feel someone is moving closer you on purpose, then run to get out of any chance of danger.

g. Or just don’t be like me

And take Uber everywhere and walk nowhere :)

Soweto | Johannesburg, South Africa

2. Trains can be dangerous here, especially in the quiet middle of the day. No police or trustworthy security around for some reason.

Joburg’s transportation system can be tricky. They do have metro train lines that can get you around, but they aren’t always recommended by locals, especially during the day when there’s not as many people around. For some reason, there’s not much security around, either, and it can feel less safe than the streets. The more quiet, the worse. I’ve taken the trains many times, though, to see what it’s like. I’ve never seen a foreigner once and I can understand why, it doesn’t feel safe. While saying that, nothing has actually happened to me, but I have gotten comments like “nice phone” while looking at my pocket, where it still was. So, if you do want to try the trains, be careful. 

Soweto | Johannesburg, South Africa

Saying that, the newer Gautrain, which takes you to the safer northern districts like Sandton, is a completely different story. It’s much more expensive, but it’s also 100 times nicer and safer. If you you’re going north, take the Gautrain.

3. Uber is a game changer and life saver in South Africa

I wrote the following for Cape Town too, but it’s even more true in Johannesburg:

Uber is a game changer in South Africa. The difference it makes here for safety and transportation is bigger than any country I’ve been to. And in Johannesburg, this more true than any city I’ve been to. With so many no go zones and dangerous areas, exploring around takes a lot of risk. And it’s a big city so walking on foot isn’t even an option many times. Muggings are as common here as anywhere, especially at night, and your transportation options can be dangerous too. The new and modern Gautrain is a safe, but only takes you a few places north of the center, while the main metro train system can be pretty sketchy. I was warned not to take it the middle of the day due to it being non-rush hours without many people around. I still took it, but felt uneasy the whole time. And never once saw a non-local take it.

Johannesburg, South Africa

Unfortunately, taxis in South Africa can feel more dangerous than walking around the city too. Many of the drivers are criminals using this as a cover or side job. They’re not always friendly and if you’re unlucky, there’s always a chance something could go wrong. At the very least, they’ll try to rip you off. Fortunately, Uber solves all these problems. They’re much safer due to Uber’s background checks and strict guidelines. They’re friendly and comfortable. And they’re even quite a bit cheaper. Using Uber is a no brainer here. Only one bit of warning is that taxi drivers aren’t too happy about losing their business so sometimes they will attack Uber drivers. I didn’t have a problem, but the Uber drivers are sometimes worried depending on the area they’re in and might not pick you up or drop you off in certain areas.

Inspiration:

For some more inspiration, you check out this article from The New Yorker on local photographer Sabelo Mlangeni and look through 33 of my photos taken in Johannesburg.

Conclusion:

Johannesburg might not be on the top of everyone’s list, especially with the warranted safety warnings and being overshadowed by the beauty of Cape Town and the rest of South Africa. For street photography and a unique big city experience, though, I honestly would recommend it. There’s something I really enjoy about the people and vibe of Joburg. Mix that with the edgy, urban center, the trendy hotspots, the safer suburbs, and the one of a kind experience Soweto provides, and you get a big city that gives interest that others don’t. You do need to be careful in Joburg, but I wouldn’t let that stop you from spending some time here and experiencing this big South African metropolis.

Soweto | Johannesburg, South Africa

I hope this guide can help you better experience Johannesburg. So, grab your camera and capture all that Johannesburg has to offer for Street Photography!

If you still have any questions about shooting in Johannesburg, feel free to comment below or email me!

(I want to make these guides as valuable as possible for all of you so add any ideas on improvements, including addition requests, in the comment section!)

Click Here For More City Street Guides!

(A New Guide Posted Every Other Week)

Johannesburg, South Africa



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