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  • f.d. walker
  • May 07, 2015 05:36:14 AM
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A Little About Us

Where Travel + Street Meet. A personal and widespread look into the world of Street Photography. Learn about Street Photography and Travel the World through the eyes of Street Photography. Join me as I travel the world on different photography projects one city at a time.

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33 Street Photography Photos from Buenos Aires, Argentina

After Santiago, came city #68 Buenos Aires on the Major City project. I’ll be discontinuing this 33 photos series on the blog soon, but I’ll explain why along with exciting details on some new things I have planned in an upcoming post. For now, though, I’ll share a last few additions of this long-time series here on […] The post 33 Street Photography Photos from Buenos Aires, Argentina appeared first on Shooter Files by f.d....

After Santiago, came city #68 Buenos Aires on the Major City project. I’ll be discontinuing this 33 photos series on the blog soon, but I’ll explain why along with exciting details on some new things I have planned in an upcoming post. For now, though, I’ll share a last few additions of this long-time series here on Shooter Files.

Here’s 33 photos that I was able to capture during my time covering Buenos Aires…

33 Street Photography Photos from Buenos Aires

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For more info on Buenos Aires, be sure to check out my first impressions from a street photographer’s perspective. And stay tuned for one of my City Street Photography Guides to Buenos Aires.

Have you photographed Buenos Aires before or do you plan on it someday? Let me know about it in the comments below!

And let me know which photos you like best too!

Click Here for More “33 Street Photos” from Cities Around the World   

The post 33 Street Photography Photos from Buenos Aires, Argentina appeared first on Shooter Files by f.d. walker.


7 First Impressions of Buenos Aires, Argentina (From a Street Photography Perspective)

Buenos Aires, Argentina came in as major city #68 on my Major City project and here I’ll share for other visiting photographers a few first impressions covering the city with my camera during my work there, from a personal street photography perspective… 7 First Impressions of Buenos Aires (From a Street Photography Perspective) 1. My first city living abroad, but first […] The post 7 First Impressions of Buenos Aires, Argentina</br> (From a Street Photography...

Buenos Aires, Argentina came in as major city #68 on my Major City project and here I’ll share for other visiting photographers a few first impressions covering the city with my camera during my work there, from a personal street photography perspective…

7 First Impressions of Buenos Aires
(From a Street Photography Perspective)

1. My first city living abroad, but first time truly seeing this huge city

Buenos Aires was the first city I lived in abroad, seven years ago. It wasn’t a long time, but long enough to have my own apartment in the heart of the city and truly experience the city more as a local. I loved it at the time and it was all a such a new experience before I’d lived in other countries, so it’s held a special memory for me ever since. But I wanted to see how much that memory changed, as I returned with photography as the focus this time. For the most part, it was as special as I remembered it.

One of the most surprising parts of working on this project is how much of each city I see, photograph and experience. And how much even locals, let alone visitors, never really see. It’s not an exaggeration that in a week I walk more parts of the city than many locals have their whole life. Locals, especially in big cities, tend to stay in their neighborhoods. They go out around their home, their work and maybe another favorite area, but really stay contained in those specific neighborhoods around the nearby metro stations. Tourists, of course, always stay in the tourist sections and rarely venture out at all past where their guide book mentions, but even locals tend to stay in their comfortable bubble of places they know. Too many times I talk to locals that really haven’t been many places in their own city.

Back when I first lived here, photography was starting as a hobby, so I ventured out more than most people I knew, but in reality, I hadn’t seen as much of the city as I did in the first 3 days of my return. Buenos Aires is gigantic and has so much variety and area to explore. If you spend the time, there’s an endless variety of places to experience and photograph. I’ll share some top spots here that attract many, but I’d recommend venturing out all over the city. Pick a different metro station to stop and explore the surrounding area, there’s always life around you here.

2. Europe meets Latin America

Buenos Aires, and Argentina in general, has a reputation of being more “European” compared to the rest of Latin America. There is definitely truth to that and much of it comes from their history and European influence. Parts of Buenos Aires, like Recoleta, can feel like walking through Paris, while the Italian influence is felt all over the city.  Unfortunately, this also can come with European prices in Buenos Aires today, when it comes to certain things. A recent study had Buenos Aires right in line with Paris when it came to the cost of a cup of coffee or eating out. Still, this unique blend of Europe and Latin America provides a very interesting and unique atmosphere that is hard not to like. 

The architecture, the cafe and bar culture, the trendy boutiques and streets, and the life of the city is full of latin energy and edge, mixed with a European flavor.

   

3. Buenos Aires keeps it busy, but cool. Love the hip, rough character

Buenos Aires is a very cool city. Not in temperature, although it does get chilly in the winter, but more in character. It’s trendy and hip, but with a roughness and edge. The interesting mix of older architecture comes with grit and graffiti. That mix of Latin and European influence comes together perfectly. You have the Parisian cool of a Recoleta near the bohemian cool of a Palermo or San Telmo. The city is filled with art, cafes, bars and life that goes well into the night. Parks and squares packed with mate sipping socializing and endless winding cobblestone streets of character. Buenos Aires knows how to mix things all together so you get the right amount of everything to keep it cool.

 

4. San Telmo Sunday Fair is a good one

Many cities have a Sunday fair or market, but Buenos Aires has one of the more famous and popular ones around. The San Telmo Sunday Fair could fill your day up for street photography with all it has going on. San Telmo is already a popular and interesting neighborhood that attracts visitors any day of the week, but on Sundays it fills with street vendors and packs with life. It has a big focus on arts, crafts, antiques and interesting old collectible items, so it’s more interesting and unique than your normal Sunday market. It’s also huge and goes on forever, while including some large pockets of vendor stands, street performers and music. It needs at least a half day of your time and is a must for photographers. Although, it’s overly photographed and touristy, it still is one of the more unique events in Buenos Aires and comes with plenty of life, character, and visually pleasing scenes.

  

5. La Boca (Caminito for everybody, venture outside for the adventurous)

La Boca is one of the more interesting neighborhoods in Latin America, and home to one of its most colorful and photogenic neighborhoods. There’s a lot of history here, but its biggest claims to fame are La Caminito and Boca Juniors. The latter is a football club famous the world over for its success and rabid fanbase. Its reputation has gained it overwhelming popularity, to the point a Boca Juniors jersey is maybe the most popular tourist souvineer going in Buenos Aires today. 

La Caminito is located just a few blocks from the famous Boca Juniors stadium, La Bombonera, and is one of the city’s top tourist attractions due to its brightly colored buildings and Tango culture. El Caminito means “little path,” so we’re talking about a small area, but it packs a punch of interest, and plenty of visitors. It’s more of an ‘open-air’ museum today and is purely for tourism, but it’s unique and visually interesting enough that photographers won’t want to miss a visit. 

Argentina is, of course, famous for the Tango dance and La Caminito is lined with fully dressed tango dancers, as the street inspired the music for the famous tango “Caminito.” For most tourists, the bright colors are what bring them more than anything, though. The neighborhood is lined with brick and metal shacks that were brushed with leftover paint that Genoese port workers got from the ships back in the day. Today, this mix of colors and character are a magnet for photos. Seeing if you can make a photo that doesn’t look like millions of others is the challenge, but if you like color, it’s hard to resist trying here.

The rest of of La Boca gets edgy and not recommended by locals to explore alone, but if you’re adventurous and like taking some risks, it’s definitely interesting and where I like to wander with my camera when I’m in the area. Just be careful and observant if you want to take the risk. Safer spots are most near La Caminito and La Bombonera stadium, where tourists will be, if you need to get away from suspicious activity.

    

6. Palermo has a great vibe for walking

For staying, Palermo is my favorite part of the city. This is where I lived years ago and it’s where many choose to stay when they visit or want to live in an area filled with things to do. It attracts a younger vibe while surrounded by bohemian character. It’s the largest barrio in Buenos Aires, so it’s divided into sections by nickname. Palermo Soho is the most popular and packed with interest, but I also like walking nearby Palermo Hollywood. 

Palermo is filled with cafes, restaurants, bars, art, shopping and nightlife. There’s a mix of culture and cool here, and you’ll see graffiti all over the neighborhood across the shorter bohemian buildings. Maybe my favorite part of Palermo are the busy squares, though. Two of the most popular are Plaza Serrano and Plaza Armenia, with Armenia being my favorite. Serrano is surrounded by bars and cafes, and is home to weekend art markets, but Armenia is more of a park space and fills with life. People of all ages come to hangout with friends, family or catch some relaxation alone. Here, you’ll see plenty of mate sipping, as friends pass the gourds around. There’s also a small amusement park, playground, park gym, a variety of spaces, and sometimes street performers. It’s a great plaza to walk around with your camera for the variety of life and interest.

Buenos Aires has so many more spots to explore for street photography, but Puerto Madero’s Waterfront makes for a nice change of scenery in the city and when in Recoleta, stopping around its famous cemetery of elaborate tombs can actually make for some interesting scenes too. 

7. Mate, Steak and Malbec…

I haven’t talked about food or drink, but Argentina is extremely well known for a few items: mate, meat and wine. No where in the world do they consume more steak per capita than here in Argentina. If you eat meat, then odds are you love steak, and here not only is it really good, but also cheap. I always eat too much steak when I’m here, but it’s hard to resist when you can’t get it like this anywhere else. I like going to the small butchers for the best prices and grilling it myself, but there’s endless restaurants and parrillas. Plus, it goes great with wine and if you like red wine, you’ll have many options of Agentina’s famous Malbecs at amazing prices. 

Then, of course, there’s mate, a traditional South American caffeine-rich infused drink made by soaking dried leaves of the yerba mate plant in hot water. If you’re not familiar with it, you’ll notice it here by the calabash gourds locals drink it out of with a long metal straw, along with thermos of hot water for refills. It’s a big social tradition here to share and drink it with friends, which I really came to enjoy when I lived here. Other than Uruguay, you won’t see people with more love for mate than here, and it really becomes part of the life and character of the city. 

 

    

If any of you have been to Buenos Aires before, tell me about your experience and impressions of the city and country in the comments below! And stay tuned for more on Buenos Aires, including some of the best Street Photography shots I captured while there.

 

Click Here for More First Impressions on Cities Around the World 

(from a street photographer’s perspective)

 

The post 7 First Impressions of Buenos Aires, Argentina</br> (From a Street Photography Perspective) appeared first on Shooter Files by f.d. walker.


33 Street Photography Photos from Mexico City, Mexico

After Port-au-prince, came city #66 Mexico City, Mexico on the Major City project. I’ll be discontinuing this 33 photos series on the blog soon, but I’ll explain why along with exciting details on some new things I have planned in an upcoming post. For now, though, I’ll share a last few additions of this long-time series here […] The post 33 Street Photography Photos from Mexico City, Mexico appeared first on Shooter Files by f.d....

After Port-au-prince, came city #66 Mexico City, Mexico on the Major City project. I’ll be discontinuing this 33 photos series on the blog soon, but I’ll explain why along with exciting details on some new things I have planned in an upcoming post. For now, though, I’ll share a last few additions of this long-time series here on Shooter Files.

So here’s 33 photos that I was able to capture during my time in Mexico City…

33 Street Photography Photos from Mexico City

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For more info on Mexico City, be sure to check out my first impressions from a street photographer’s perspective. And stay tuned for one of my City Street Photography Guides to Mexico City.

Have you photographed Mexico City before or do you plan on it someday? Let me know about it in the comments below!

And let me know which photos you like best too!

Click Here for More “33 Street Photos” from Cities Around the World   

 

The post 33 Street Photography Photos from Mexico City, Mexico appeared first on Shooter Files by f.d. walker.


2020 Print Sale

Hey everyone, starting today, I have a Limited 2020 Run of prints for sale for a limited time (one week!). I hold these limited print runs once a year for a short time. All prints are 1-of-1 (except one) and all 2o20 run selections are first time prints. This run comes in a 8″x12″ (20.32 x 30.48 cm) size (similar […] The post 2020 Print Sale appeared first on Shooter Files by f.d....

Hey everyone, starting today, I have a Limited 2020 Run of prints for sale for a limited time (one week!).

I hold these limited print runs once a year for a short time. All prints are 1-of-1 (except one) and all 2o20 run selections are first time prints. This run comes in a 8″x12″ (20.32 x 30.48 cm) size (similar to A4 size, w/ small .25” white border). One print also has a 12″x18″ (30 x 46cm) option.

Below, I have two discount codes if you order more than one print

(Normally, I hold these yearly limited print sales at the end of each year, but due to the pandemic it’s been a rough year and I doubt I’ll be able to sell prints this winter, so I’m holding it now and I appreciate you all looking.)

These will never be available again in this size and print at this price. They all come signed and numbered on the back (shipped in protective packaging). Two prints are also available from last year’s print run. Sale will only be going for one week before I have to get back on the road and since most prints are 1-of-1, get them while you can. Thanks for looking!

Check out the link below to see all the prints available and order:

Link: http://forrestwalker.bigcartel.com

(Sale ends 08/25/2020)

Thanks and All the best!

– Forrest 

Specials / Discount Codes:

  • Order 2 Prints, Get $10 off – Discount Code: TWO10
  • Order 3 Prints, Get $30 off – Discount Code: THREE30

The post 2020 Print Sale appeared first on Shooter Files by f.d. walker.


7 First Impressions of Mexico City, Mexico (From a Street Photography Perspective)

Mexico City, Mexico came in as major city #66 on my Major City project and here I’ll share a few first impressions covering the city with my camera during my work there. Not many cities have brought me more diverse opinions. While a reputation of danger scares many away, others find a surprisingly interesting, historic and cleaned up city. The truth […] The post 7 First Impressions of Mexico City, Mexico</br> (From a Street Photography Perspective) appeared first on...

Mexico City, Mexico came in as major city #66 on my Major City project and here I’ll share a few first impressions covering the city with my camera during my work there.

Not many cities have brought me more diverse opinions. While a reputation of danger scares many away, others find a surprisingly interesting, historic and cleaned up city. The truth is Mexico City does warrant caution, especially outside the more touristic spots, but it’s also one of the more complex, attractive and memorable big cities you’ll experience. And big it is. Packed with culture and history around the buzzing center, you’ll also find a modern, contemporary city. You’ll find plenty of edge too. This brings more character, but bring your street smarts, as mine were needed on multiple occasions here. For street photography, there’s a charm to it that feels authentic and edgy, bringing a unique appeal that I’d recommend, warnings and all. 

So here are my first impressions of Mexico City, from a personal street photographer perspective…

7 First Impressions of Mexico City
(From a Street Photography Perspective)

1. Around the Old Town

Mexico City has one of the most impressive old towns around in Latin America. I’d say only Quito and Havana rival it, but neither on as grand of scale. Also, being “Centro,” it has a busy downtown feeling blended in with older architecture and character. 

Zócalo is its central square and center of tourism. Near here, you’ll also find the famous Templo Mayor ruins. For me, it’s more touristy than I like for photography, but many will love it. The surrounding area is where I enjoyed walking more for street photography, though.

Some of my favorite spots around the Old Town were Alameda Central and Garibaldi. Alameda Central has my favorite large urban park in the city for variety of activity and life, while Garibaldi mixes a little more edge in with the its Mariachi atmosphere. Plaza Garibaldi was renamed in 1920 and has since become strongly associated with the most Mexican genre of music, Mariachi. Musicians in full traditonal attire hang out here along with other related attractions. It does get a little edgier this way and as you go further north, but I found myself exploring up here whenever in the center. 

 

2. Dangers are real, but much is avoidable

Mexico City has a pretty bad reputation when it comes to safety. Look online and you’ll think there’s no escaping getting mugged once you step out on the street. The truth is, for most, it feels fine and they leave without trouble. But there is plenty of reason, and data, for the warnings too. Like with most cities, it really depends on where you go and how street smart you are.

The center, where most visitors go, generally feels pretty safe, especially during the day. There’s so many attractions, people, and police around that you shouldn’t feel unsafe. Petty theft like pick-pocketing is still a danger, of course, though.

During my Major City work, it’s one of only a few places pick-pocketing has been attempted on me. Luckily, I caught what was going on and somehow startled the man into dropping my phone just as he had swiped it from my pocket. In my case, they worked in a team, where a woman within a crowd started pushing her chest up against me and immediately started yelling at me as if I was the one initiating it. Then, as I’m distracted, a man behind picked my pocket and tried to run off with my phone. Her actions were so strange to me, that luckily, my first reaction was slapping both hands down on my pockets. So, keep your belongings secure at all times, watch your surroundings, and you shouldn’t have to worry much about violent crime during the day in the center.

Outside the center and a few nicer neighborhoods, things do get sketchier quick. I was followed multiple times and had one man try to trick me into coming closer, but keeping your distance from everyone and trusting no one is the best defense against anything happening. Most of these places are areas you probably wouldn’t be interested in visiting, anyway, but for street photography they can be. Just be careful. 

3. Outskirts of the center have some edge. And danger.

Once you start exploring outside the Centro/Old Town is where you can quickly feel it starting getting edgier. And yes, more dangerous, but there’s a lot of character to be found. My favorite areas on the edge were exploring past the south and north ends of centro. While many locals told me they don’t go past here, Tepito was one of my favorite areas on these outskirts. While followed and eyed a few times here, there’s busy streets nearby that you can quickly get back to. Keeping your distance between suspicious strangers is a good deterrent when venturing away. 

Tepito feels older and has colorful scenery and character mixed in with the edge. There’s an artistic subculture found and felt here too, along with its reputation of being home to many boxers and gangs. In addition, it’s home to a large traditional open-air market, called a tianguis, and a flea market. 

  

4. Dia del Muerte brings pluses and minus

I went during the famous holiday of Dia del Muerte, but I made sure to stay after too so I could get both impressions. Most visitors will want to go during the holiday, but for street photography, it can depend on what you’re looking for. It’s definitely a chaotic and unique celebration in Mexico City, so photo ops will be plentiful. For me, though, big events come with pluses and minuses. The big plus is you have guaranteed interest for photography, the minus is the event overwhelms your photos. If you’re coming to shoot that event, then that’s perfect, but if you also want to shoot the day-to-day city life, it can take from that. So, while I enjoyed the major celebrations, I probably enjoyed exploring the city life just as much afterwards when I got a real feel for Mexico City.

Dia del Muerte definitely packs the city and continues to get bigger and bigger, as more and more people visit for the celebrations. Centro is where the biggest festivities happen, but be prepared for crowds, especially on the most important events. Around the city you can find other events too that I’d recommend. Coyoacan has a great celebration combined with charming scenery in this trendy neighborhood. And I’d highly recommend going to Panteón de Dolores cemetery, where all the locals celebrate around the graves throughout the day. There’s a more famous cemetery celebration outside of the city, but it’s still a long ride away and this one provides plenty of interest and activity within the city.

  

5. Mix of History and Modernity

Mexico City is one of the stronger combinations of historic old and modern metropolis you’ll find, which I really enjoy in a big city. This brings a ton of character and atmosphere along with the variety of life a big modern city contains. There’s many faces to Mexico City and this combination of old and new is a big reason for that. The present and past clash, creating interest and a unique place for street photography. When it comes to Latin America, Mexico City is at the top of the list for such a combination too. The history, culture, religion and architecture is all there to explore and experience, along with the new modern era in one of the world’s biggest cities. 

 

6. Similarities to NYC for street photography, minus 20 years?

On multiple occasions, I’d been told by photographers that Mexico City reminded them of a New York City 20-30 years ago in some ways, at least more than most cities. As in the character, life and edge they felt back then when out shooting the city. I can’t say, of course, but I could see some similarities where one might feel that. It’s massive, edgy, filled with character and characters, raw, rugged and full of authenticity. There’s some mixture of American influence found within it too, especially compared to the rest of Mexico. 

I find the authentic big city life in Mexico City as interesting as just about anywhere in Latin America, and I’d say the same about NYC in the USA. It’s a little more of a challenge than an NYC, but it’s definitely there to find.  For truly BIG city life with a latin atmosphere, this is about as good as it gets. 

 

7. Lots of neighborhoods to explore

I love cities with a variety of neighborhoods of different character to explore. There’s certain major cities that stand out in this category due to the sheer number and variety of atmospheres. Cities like New York, London, Istanbul, Tokyo and Sao Paulo come to mind. Mexico City is up there too. Whatever you want, you can find, and whatever you didn’t know you want, you’ll probably find here too. It’s a city that provides an amount of unique neighborhoods that would last a local. 

Coyoacan

Out of Mexico City’s endless number of neighborhoods, here’s my top areas to explore with your camera:

  1. Centro Historico/Parque Alameda
  2. Zocalo/Av Francisco I. Madero
  3. Plaza Garibaldi
  4. Paseo de la Reforma
  5. La Condesa
  6. Coyoacan (Jardin Centenario/Jardin Plaza Hidalgo)
  7. Tepito
  8. Roma

 

 

If any of you have been to Mexico City before, tell me about your experience and impressions of the city and country in the comments below! And stay tuned for more on Mexico City, including some of the best Street Photography shots I captured while there.

 

Click Here for More First Impressions on Cities Around the World 

(from a street photographer’s perspective)

 

The post 7 First Impressions of Mexico City, Mexico</br> (From a Street Photography Perspective) appeared first on Shooter Files by f.d. walker.


3-Day Street Photography Workshop in London, UK

3-Day Street Photography Workshop in London, UK AUGUST 31st – SEPTEMBER 2nd : LONDON, UK STREET PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP WITH FORREST WALKER This workshop is STILL GOING! Participants have already signed up and this will be the first workshop back on the schedule. Two spots are available! Read on for more details and how to sign up… […] The post 3-Day Street Photography Workshop in London, UK appeared first on Shooter Files by f.d....

3-Day Street Photography Workshop

in London, UK

AUGUST 31st – SEPTEMBER 2nd : LONDON, UK

  • STREET PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP WITH FORREST WALKER

This workshop is STILL GOING! Participants have already signed up and this will be the first workshop back on the schedule. Two spots are available!

Read on for more details and how to sign up…

This intensive three-day workshop will focus on photographic vision and seeing more. You’ll learn to see more photos when out shooting, how to put together what you see into the photo you want to make, improve your editing process and help find yourself in your photography. We will work together to accomplish these goals through a variety of lessons covering a variety of work, reviews of your own work, editing sessions, activities and plenty of shooting throughout the streets of London. Led by international photographer Forrest Walker, this workshop will be an immersive and educational experience.

Find Participant Testimonials and Photos from Forrest Walker’s Workshops HERE

Full 3-Day Workshop Fee £450 £375 per person (Early Price Discount)

RESERVE SPOT

 

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP

Places are strictly limited, sign up early to avoid disappointment

WHERE: London, UK

WHEN: August 31st – September 2nd, 2020 (3 Full Days)

Daily Schedule (Detailed itinerary will be emailed to participants):

  • Friday August 31st: 10am-6:00pm
  • Saturday September 1st: 8:30am-5:30pm
  • Sunday September 2nd: 9am-6:00pm

*We will break for lunch daily and all are invited to dinner and drinks afterwards for more interaction

Workshop Description:

On this three-day workshop, you’ll be able to capture the areas that London is known for, along with some of the more local favorite spots and my street photography selections from covering the city. This will be an intensive and highly involved workshop where you’ll be challenged to improve your photography in a variety of ways, led by someone who’s photographed over 100 major cities across the world inside and out. London stays at the top of my list for street photography and I’ve spent countless hours exploring its endless streets of interest over the years. With a 5 participant max on the workshop, you’ll be able to get the most out of our time together in London.

This will be an intensive, but highly enjoyable workshop experience that includes a mixture of daily photo walks, photo critiques, interactive lessons, editing sessions, activities and discussions. A major focus will be on photographic vision and seeing more. You’ll learn to see more photos when out shooting, how to put together what you see into the photo you want to make, improve your editing process and help find yourself in your photography. There will be a lot of walking and photography, with myself fully involved each step of the way to make sure you get the most out of your week. You will be able to fully immerse yourself into the city through street photography, so you can learn more, photograph more and see more.

What’s Included?:

  • A variety of guided street photography walks giving a wide view of photo opportunities and exploration in London.
  • 1-on-1 shooting with your instructor to provide feedback, tips, guidance, and allow you to observe how I work. You will also be allowed to work on your photography without distraction during the walks.
  • Multiple educational and inspirational lessons covering different aspects of street photography.
  • An initial portfolio review followed by daily critiques and a final editing lesson covering your work during the workshop.
  • Constant access to your instructor, including outside of the workshop’s scheduled time. 
  • Activities planned to give time for bonding with other photographers, while having a great time in London.
  • A memorable experience not only improving your photography, but also enjoying one of the world’s most interesting cities.

Additional Information:

  • The workshop will be very limited to keep the group small and give plenty of personal attention and quality interaction.
  • The workshop fee covers not only the time during the workshop schedule, but also the time spent on workshop preparation with each individual, and any time needed outside of the daily schedule while in London.

WHAT TO BRING:

Good walking shoes, camera(s), lens – between 50mm and 21mm equivalents preferred, sunscreen, water bottle, cool and comfortable clothing, laptop with appropriate processing software installed (Lightroom, Capture One or Photoshop), spare batteries and memory cards, notepad, pen, and mobile/ smart phone.

Full 3-Day Workshop Fee £450 £375 per person (Early Price Discount)

RESERVE SPOT

 

Places are strictly limited, sign up early to avoid disappointment

 

Terms and Cancellation Policy:

  •           Workshop fees include tuition ONLY. Participants are responsible for their own equipment costs, food and beverage costs, and travel expenses.
  •          Forrest Walker accepts no liability for any loss or damage of participants’ equipment or liability for injury, illness or misadventure during the course of the workshop. The public liability of the participants is their own responsibility as is conducting themselves safely and according to Japanese Law at all times.
  •           Forrest Walker reserves the right to cancel the workshop at any time, for any reason. In this event, participants will receive a 100% refund on any fees paid.
  •          Forrest Walker is not responsible for reimbursement of travel expenses in the event of a cancellation. We recommend that you buy refundable air tickets and/or travel insurance. Cancellations: More than 31 days before workshop begins, participant will receive a 100% refund. Between 11-31 days before workshop begins, participant will receive a 50% refund. Within 10 days of workshop, participants will receive NO refund.

The post 3-Day Street Photography Workshop in London, UK appeared first on Shooter Files by f.d. walker.


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