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Relationship Matters

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  • Clinton Power
  • January 29, 2010 08:14:53 AM
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Relationship Matters provides relationship tips, advice, information and the latest research to help you create a great relationship!

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3 Simple Tips to Build a Long-Lasting Relationship

Relationship success doesn’t come from grand gestures or declarations. What keeps a relationship strong and enduring is far more related to the work you put in. It’s about developing and maintaining a secure-functioning relationship and finding a partner that you can feel safe and open with. Defining a secure-functioning relationship According to PACT (Psychobiological Approach […] The post 3 Simple Tips to Build a Long-Lasting Relationship appeared first on Clinton Power +...

tips for long-lasting relationship

Relationship success doesn’t come from grand gestures or declarations. What keeps a relationship strong and enduring is far more related to the work you put in. It’s about developing and maintaining a secure-functioning relationship and finding a partner that you can feel safe and open with.

Defining a secure-functioning relationship

According to PACT (Psychobiological Approach to Couples Therapy) co-founder Dr. Stan Tatkin, a secure-functioning relationship is an interpersonal system based on principles of true mutuality, collaboration, justice, fairness, and sensitivity. Partners stand together against the world and protect each other. A secure-functioning relationship acknowledges and celebrates your differences in mind, history, and drive. It relies on interdependence, where both partners take up the burden and care of each other in equal measure.

The benefits of secure-functioning

There are many benefits to a secure-functioning relationship. A secure-functioning relationship means you have an inherent knowledge of always having support from your partner. True mutuality, in turn, means you’re also truly seen and understood by your partner.

Hurts are repaired quickly for the benefit and care of both partners. You both chose a survival teammate, so you know your partner has your back and will protect you when needed.

A secure-functioning relationship is based on clearly defined boundaries. Understanding and respecting these boundaries for both partners breeds safety, security, interdependence, support, and happiness in your relationship.

These benefits create a healthy relationship foundation on which your connection can grow and thrive into long-term happiness.

Building a safe and secure relationship

Any long-lasting relationship requires consistent effort and energy input. It’s an on-going task to build and maintain the structure of your relationship. Regardless of which boundaries, rules, practices, and habits you build into your relationship, these behaviours should reflect you and your partner and guide you in taking care of the foundation of your relationship.

Here are 3 PACT relationship essentials to help you build a strong foundation with your partner:

1.   Be present with your partner

It’s easy to drift away from your partner amid the demands of everyday life. It may be effortless to run parallel to each other, taking on roles of taxi driver or life manager instead of intimate loving partner. Your energy and communication centre around what needs to get done rather than one another. For example, when you will be home, what time to pick the kids up, which bills still need to be paid.

Taking the time to be present with your partner and in your relationship is a counterbalance to the busy pace of life. It’s crucial to make time for just each other, with no distractions and no technology.

Gaze lovingly into each other’s eyes every day for at least 30 seconds – and longer is even better. The goal is to be mentally and emotionally present, as this has a profound neurobiological effect that allows you to calm each other’s nervous system. This activity also amplifies positive feelings toward each other, evoking earlier phases of your relationship, where you likely did this without prompting.

2.   Quickly repair after a fight

Even the strongest couples have disagreements and fights, but what distinguishes them is the decision to make amends after a dispute promptly. When you prioritise repairing after a row, you fix the hurt, relinquish resentments, and focus on enjoying life again.

Neurobiologically, it’s vital to repair after a fight swiftly. Otherwise, painful experiences and emotions can get coded into your long-term memory system, which can make recovering from future conflicts and disagreements more difficult.

How can you effectively repair after a fight?

·       Listen to your partner

·       Use empathy

·       Validate their feelings and thoughts

·       Take responsibility for your part in the problem

·       Sincerely apologise

The delivery of your apology is paramount. Facing your partner directly and gazing lovingly into their eyes with a soft facial expression and a song-like cadence to your voice helps prevent agitation and arousal in your partner. In turn, this aids in their acceptance of your repair.

3.   Remain tethered to each other

We are wired to be connected to others. So, it’s important to be available for and respond to your partner when they indicate they need you – this shows that they’re able to connect with you. Without this connection, your partner is liable to experience pain and distress.

Cutting off communication, shutting down, and withdrawing can be harmful to your relationship in both big and small ways. For instance, your partner initiates a conversation with you, but you’re focused on something else and not actively listening to them. Your partner will likely feel annoyed about not receiving your full attention and may abandon the attempt to connect with you.

A common way to deal with hurt in an argument is to shut down. This reaction is an attempt to protect your feelings or punish your partner, but it undermines the safety and security of your relationship. It’s an active step that fights against the person who has your back.

It’s your role to protect each other. This includes protecting your partner from yourself.

Make a point to be available for contact when you’re separate from each other. This doesn’t mean communication from your partner takes priority over everything, but it does mean you can be relied upon to connect when you have free time. Check-ins throughout the day help in maintaining safety and security in your relationship.

In all crucial matters, you need to be each other’s first resort. Don’t let other areas of your life infringe on your partner or relationship.

Closing thoughts

Relationship essentials are significantly more impactful to your relationship than occasional gestures and symbols. A secure-functioning relationship based on PACT principles provides safety and security for both partners. Developing and maintaining these practices continually contribute to long-term relationship happiness.

Do you need relationship help?

If you need help with starting or maintaining a relationship, contact Clinton Power + Associates on (02) 8968 9323 to discuss your situation and find out how we can help.

The post 3 Simple Tips to Build a Long-Lasting Relationship appeared first on Clinton Power + Associates.


COVID Break-ups: How to End Your Relationship with Dignity 

The changes in our lives caused by Coronavirus are stressful. That stress will have an impact on our relationships as well. What do you do if you find your relationship buckling under the pressure of COVID-19? And what do you do if it’s time to break up? Think about it; be certain of your decision […] The post COVID Break-ups: How to End Your Relationship with Dignity  appeared first on Clinton Power +...

covid breakups

The changes in our lives caused by Coronavirus are stressful. That stress will have an impact on our relationships as well. What do you do if you find your relationship buckling under the pressure of COVID-19? And what do you do if it’s time to break up?

Think about it; be certain of your decision

We never make good decisions when we’re stressed or managing a crisis. So, if possible, avoid making big decisions in the middle of the pandemic. Take the time to really explore and think about if your relationship has reached its end.

The tension in your relationship may be a result of the conditions brought about by COVID-19, rather than relationship issues. Reflect on what is causing you to consider a break-up.

Being in the company of your partner 24/7 and learning you can’t handle the way they talk on the phone with work colleagues is a direct result of the pandemic. Being in isolation with your partner and finding that you don’t feel supported or secure is a relationship issue.

Discovering that your relationship has issues isn’t necessarily cause for a break-up either. It may be possible to work through your problems and strengthen your relationship.

If you find you and your partner cannot resolve your issues, explore what other options are available to you. Couples therapy may provide the assistance you need, and most couples therapists now offer online services to accommodate the restrictions of Coronavirus.

If you feel any uncertainty about breaking up, now is not the time to be deciding to end your relationship. Be sure and choose free of stressful circumstances before you break up your relationship.

How to break up with dignity

Break-ups are challenging, regardless of the circumstances. The tension can be exacerbated if you’re cohabitating in a time of quarantine. These practices can lessen the strain during a break-up.

Be clear and honest about your feelings: Tell your partner how you feel and what you need. Your needs are real, and your emotions are valid, clear communication is the easiest way to understand the situation. Sharing your needs and feelings doesn’t mean telling your partner what they did wrong or tearing them down. It’s about expressing what you feel and need. “I” statements” are a great tool to communicate your needs.

Make a clean break: Be upfront about what you want, don’t beat about the bush, and don’t use a “soft break” to avoid the situation. Have a difficult conversation and be clear and intentional about what you want and need. This communication ensures everyone is on the same page and clearly understands the situation.

Physically separate: If possible, have one of you move in with another family member or different accommodation. Physical separation helps reduce tension and opportunities for conflict. Maintaining distance is also an essential aide in accepting the demise of the relationship and helps with the grieving process.

Don’t send mixed messages: Since you’ve chosen to end the relationship, your actions are most beneficial if they reflect that decision. Choosing to break-up and then showing romantic interest or encouragement will hurt and confuse the other person. Be respectful of the other person’s emotions.

Take responsibility for the decision: Be responsible for what it means to terminate a relationship, and the steps involved. Ending a relationship with no communication or explanation is painful. Be present and talk through the needs, changes, and expectations with the other person. These steps are especially vital if your break-up will impact others, such as children.

The challenges of a COVID break-up

A critical difference between a break-up in quarantine and a break-up under normal circumstances is the likelihood of not being able to physically separate and get the space needed to properly grieve, accept, and adjust to the loss of the relationship.

It’s an essential step in a break-up to mourn its loss. This step can be challenging when we’re not able to go out and participate in regular activities to distract from the distress.

In addition to not having adequate separation or space to grieve, being nearby under tense emotional circumstances can make it challenging to function peacefully as roommates. Striking this balance and finding a healthy and respectful way to communicate and interact is vital to navigating a successful break-up in quarantine.

Here are some tips to ease tension and maintain civility during a break-up in isolation:

Don’t rehash relationship grievances: This is a time to put your grievances aside and focus on finding an adult way to co-exist. Restating old issues is likely to cause more harm. An effective way to co-exist harmoniously is to find a common goal to orient yourselves around and work toward it.

Look for opportunities for one of you to move out: This doesn’t mean jumping on the first available opportunity to get one of you out of the house. Both of you need to be in safe and secure lodging. Look for supportive people that you can stay with for the duration of the quarantine. Family members and sometimes friends can offer alternative accommodation after a relationship breakdown.

Postpone discussions while in quarantine: Avoid getting caught up in your drama – you can’t get away and get space if things blow up while you’re in quarantine. Wait to have sensitive and provoking discussions until you’re both in a position to get distance if emotions run too high. However, do discuss how to function while continuing to cohabitate, a concise discussion about the break-up, and establishing boundaries.

Finally, if you have children together, remember to put them first. Break-ups are painful and emotionally draining, but prioritising your kids over relationship grievances is essential for your children’s welfare. It also provides a common goal of maintaining unity within the family unit rather than focusing your energies on discord and hurt feelings.

The takeaway

Break-ups are hard regardless of the circumstances, but being quarantined together during one can be extra challenging. Avoid making big decisions under such stressful conditions, and only act with certainty. Be upfront, concise, and fair. Work together to reduce as much tension as possible and physically separate if you can. Put your children ahead of your grievances and focus on family first.

Do you need relationship help?

If you need help with starting or maintaining a relationship, contact Clinton Power + Associates on (02) 8968 9323 to discuss your situation and find out how we can help.

The post COVID Break-ups: How to End Your Relationship with Dignity  appeared first on Clinton Power + Associates.


How to Ensure Your Relationship Thrives During COVID-19

The coronavirus has changed our lives. With change comes stress. A big adjustment we’re dealing with is the additional stress on our relationships. Some couples are adapting and flourishing under this new stress, while others are coming undone as underlying issues are pushed to the forefront of the relationship while remaining unresolved. So how do […] The post How to Ensure Your Relationship Thrives During COVID-19 appeared first on Clinton Power +...

COVID-19 relationship stress

The coronavirus has changed our lives. With change comes stress. A big adjustment we’re dealing with is the additional stress on our relationships.

Some couples are adapting and flourishing under this new stress, while others are coming undone as underlying issues are pushed to the forefront of the relationship while remaining unresolved.

So how do we cope with the added stress and the confinement?

Stress management is critical

Surviving the relationship stress of coronavirus is a process. Identifying what factors are adding pressure to your relationship is a significant step in that process.

Change breeds stress. A lot of this stress comes from the new circumstance of being confined to your house. Talk about this with your partner. Acknowledge the ways you’re each dealing with the situation.

There isn’t one right way to deal with stress, so if you and your partner are handling the strain differently, that doesn’t make one of you wrong.

Articulate your feelings

Use your words to talk about your feelings, worries, and fears. “I’m stressed” isn’t helpful when everyone is constantly feeling stress, but articulating what’s causing you stress, or what emotion is manifesting that pressure can be a useful release for you and your partner.

Here are some examples of how to talk about your stress in a useful way:

  • “I’m anxious because I’m afraid of getting sick, and I’m worried about my family getting sick.”
  • “I’m afraid we won’t have enough money to pay for food.”
  • “I’m concerned about not having enough work, and I’m worried I won’t have work in the future either.”
  • “I’m uncertain because things are so different, and the change is uncomfortable.”

Keep an open mind. Almost everything about our day-to-day lives has changed, so the standards by which we measure things have to adjust as well. Be supportive of your partner, and remember to approach this as a unified team. You’re in this together, so make an effort to tackle it together.

Use laughter to defuse tension

Laugh. It’s so simple, it’s easy to overlook, but humour is a great way to ease tension.

In the wake of uncertainty and crisis, laughter can defuse conflict, and it’s essential to continue experiencing pleasure, especially in times when it is difficult to find. If something makes you laugh, share it with your partner. Laughing together reduces the negativity as a shared experience.

Check in with loved ones

Of course, in this time of isolation, we’re all stressed and worried about the people who are important to us. Checking in regularly with loved ones is an easy way to reduce that stress and surround yourself with people who will promote positive emotions.

Check-ins also provide the opportunity to make sure others in your life are okay amid this high-stress situation. It’s essential to do this with the people you’re distanced from right now, but it’s also important to check-in with your partner.

There are a lot of new stress factors in the wake of coronavirus, but reducing the stress in your relationship will have a considerable impact on how you navigate through this crisis and manage the other stressful factors in your life.

Self-reflection and prioritising what’s important

Once you’ve managed your stress (well done, that’s a huge accomplishment!), then you can turn your focus from external factors to internal ones. Couples flourishing in isolation are spending time self-reflecting and being aware of positive things in their lives.

With everything in our daily lives changed, it’s an opportunity to reflect on what you miss and what you don’t. Thinking about why you miss the things you do is also essential. Many people and couples are finding that their lives were full of things that held no value for them. With the forced absence of so much, we can turn our attention to the things that matter to us.

To identify vital things, you have to be able to reflect on who you are as a person. Reflect on your life, both individually and as a couple. This reflection is an excellent opportunity to develop yourself as a person and to work on personal growth. Once you have a clear idea of who you are and what’s significant to you, you can prioritise those things in your life.

Don’t be surprised if the way you had things prioritised in your life isn’t the same as how you want to prioritise them now. Growth begets change, but unlike the change put upon you by the coronavirus, you have control over how your personal growth affects your life.

Look to the future

You’ve managed the stress. You’ve reflected on what’s important to you and shifted the things you want to prioritise in your life. Now you get to look forward to the future.

Maybe you’ve decided you want to spend more time with your family and less time at the office, or that you want to save up for a new cultural experience instead of a fancy car. Whichever way you’ve decided to reprioritise things in your life, there’s an exciting journey waiting for you at the end of this period of isolation.

Amid all the uncertainty the future holds, there are things that you’ll have control over, and implementing the items you want to prioritise in your life is one of them. Having something positive to focus on and look forward to in the future is an excellent way to manage stress about future uncertainty.

I was recently interviewed for “Cuppa with Kumi” on the ABC TV Instagram Live Channel to discuss how COVID-19 is impacting love and relationships.

Watch the replay of the Instagram Live below.

The takeaway

There’s no doubt that Coronavirus has put a lot of extra stress on our relationships, as with everything else in our lives. Managing that stress is imperative to maintaining a positive and healthy relationship.

Couples who are having the most success navigating this pandemic are taking this a step further and making time for reflection and collecting the positive things in their lives. Having a positive change to look forward to in a future of uncertainty helps keep a positive attitude.

Do you need relationship help?

If you need help with starting or maintaining a relationship, contact Clinton Power + Associates on (02) 8968 9323 to discuss your situation and find out how we can help.

The post How to Ensure Your Relationship Thrives During COVID-19 appeared first on Clinton Power + Associates.


How to Bring Separated Families Together in the Pandemic Lockdown

Being in quarantine or isolation in a pandemic is difficult. Taking care of children during a time of isolation with no schooling institutions or daycare increases that challenge significantly. Being a separated couple or blended family with children during a pandemic is just plain hard. Unfortunately, this is the reality many of us are navigating […] The post How to Bring Separated Families Together in the Pandemic Lockdown appeared first on Clinton Power +...

families in pandemic

Being in quarantine or isolation in a pandemic is difficult. Taking care of children during a time of isolation with no schooling institutions or daycare increases that challenge significantly. Being a separated couple or blended family with children during a pandemic is just plain hard.

Unfortunately, this is the reality many of us are navigating in our new lives in the wake of COVID-19. Routines get boggled, custody exchanges feel like a health risk, new responsibilities surface, and we’re more limited in how we can address, accommodate, and adapt to these changes than usual.

Putting your children first

The thing that you have in common as a separated couple is your children. To assist in navigating these new challenges as a separated couple, focus on coming at the problems or changes with the attitude of always putting your children first. This way, you can work together to solve the issues you’re facing instead of fighting against each other to get what you want.

Finding common ground may seem complicated, but the goals you’re reaching toward are that common ground – taking care of your kids’ needs. Goal-oriented problem-solving is much easier when you’re working toward the same goal.

Tips for separated parenting during COVID-19

I recently spoke with my colleague, Family law mediator, Gloria Hawke. She’s seeing a sharp rise in families requiring mediation to help with parenting matters during the COVID-19 crisis.

Here are her tips on managing the increased stress and anxiety as a separated couple during the new reality of COVID-19:

Communication: Take the time to talk. The situation that you’re in now is new for both of you. It’s time to set past grievances aside and discuss the current circumstances. If this isn’t possible on your own, look to a trusted third person to assist in discussions.

Be open about your concerns and feelings, help the other parent understand what isolation looks like in your home. Different people have different health risks, work situations, financial pictures, house rules, and anxiety levels. Remember that just as everything in your life has changed, so too has everything in the other parent’s – you’re both in a new set of circumstances.

Advanced planning: Plan for the necessity of at-home schooling for the foreseeable future and determine who will manage which responsibilities. At-home education might include home tutoring and online extracurricular activities. Don’t forget to discuss who will pay for educational changes.

Raising concerns: Be direct about the COVID-19 risks that concern you. Remember, you’re working together to meet your children’s needs, now isn’t the time for blame or accusations. Focus on the issue, share your point of view, and ask the other person for theirs as well. Explain why you feel the way you do and provide background information to help the other parent understand. The goal is to come up with a solution you can both accept.

Extra comfort: Remember that your children, from toddlers to teens, are feeling stressed and worried by the circumstances of the pandemic as well. They may be needier right now. Providing in-person physical and verbal reassurance can help reduce their anxiety. Additional phone or video communication with friends and family can provide comfort and assurance as well.

Custody agreements: The Coronavirus is enough to make you want to keep your kids away from anyone and anything. However, it is important to stick to your custody agreement as much as possible at this time.

Tips for families with separated parents during COVID-19

There has been a marked increase in distress in families and relationships in response to COVID-19.

Here are my tips on managing the tension and strain with your family during self-isolation:

Maintain routines: Keep the daily schedule as healthy and regular as possible. Wake up and go to bed at the same time, have family meals together, and have set work and relaxation times. These efforts create a sense of normalcy for the whole family.

Manage privacy: Having your own time and space away from others is just as important as time together. Create a shared space within the house where you go to connect and a private space where you can go to relax and not be interrupted.

Deal with conflict: When conflict does arise, look for areas of agreement and seek to repair any upsets quickly. Never let a fight run longer than 10-15 minutes. The focus isn’t on avoiding or not having conflict – it will happen. Instead, seek to resolve the dispute rather than letting it fester.

Create a culture of gratitude: Share daily appreciations with your partner and family. Keeping a positive perspective about small things in the day helps maintain a positive outlook on the bigger picture.

Watch the video below to see my interview with Gloria Hawke, where we discussed:

  • what is mediation and what it entails
  • why a couple or family choose mediation over legal options
  • how mediation is effective for resolving disputes and the legal ramifications for the families involved
  • how COVID-19 is impacting separated families right now
  • the main issues for co-parents navigating child-sharing arrangements
  • tips and suggestions for separated parents during this crisis

The takeaway

We’re all managing a large amount of change in our lives. The COVID-19 lockdown measures have disrupted the regular patterns of our lives. This change is especially challenging for families with separated parents. Focus on putting your children first, setting aside previous grievances with their other parent, and working together to meet your children’s needs. Reducing the amount of stress we experience related to COVID-19 benefits us all.

Do you need relationship help?

Clinton Power now provides all counselling services online via Zoom video conferencing. If you need help with starting or maintaining a relationship, contact Clinton Power + Associates on (02) 8968 9323 to find out how we can help.

About Gloria Hawke

Gloria Hawke - Family Law MediatorGloria Hawke is one of Sydney’s leading family law mediators, as rated in the Doyles guide 2019 and 2020 by her peers, family lawyers, and barristers.

Gloria has worked with many hundreds of families in her private practice helping them navigate parenting plans and financial settlements through separation and divorce.

Gloria coaches mediation students at both the College of Law and Relationships Australia and is one of the co-founders of the Mediation Collective.

Gloria has qualifications in interdisciplinary collaborative practice and works with families to help them avoid litigation and court wherever possible.

Visit www.mediationcollective.com.au and www.hawkemediation.com.au

The post How to Bring Separated Families Together in the Pandemic Lockdown appeared first on Clinton Power + Associates.


The Benefits and Challenges of Online Therapy

In a time of quarantine and self-isolation, getting the counselling you need can be difficult. Fortunately, online therapy (also called Telehealth, distance therapy, or remote therapy) provides a way to get the help you need while at a distance from your health-care professionals. Online therapy is typically provided using video conferencing (or video calling). It’s […] The post The Benefits and Challenges of Online Therapy appeared first on Clinton Power +...

online therapy

In a time of quarantine and self-isolation, getting the counselling you need can be difficult. Fortunately, online therapy (also called Telehealth, distance therapy, or remote therapy) provides a way to get the help you need while at a distance from your health-care professionals.

Online therapy is typically provided using video conferencing (or video calling). It’s a way to communicate using your smartphone, computer, or tablet that allows you to see and talk to someone who may be far away. Video calls can take the place of your in-person appointments while you stay at home.

A video call requires 3 things:

  • The device: your computer, smartphone, or tablet
  • Internet: you will need a stable internet connection (Wi-Fi or 4G) to make and maintain a successful call
  • The app: video calls require both users to use the same program to make the call, Skype and Zoom are 2 commonly used video applications

The benefits of online therapy

More than 30 years of research shows that online therapy is just as effective as face-to-face therapy. Furthermore, there are advantages of online counselling over traditional methods. Here are a few to consider:

  • Availability of resources: if you’re in a small town or remote area with fewer local resources, you may not have easy access to counselling professionals. Online therapy gives you access to services and professionals you might otherwise have to travel outside of your immediate community to find.
  • Accessibility: if you have physical limitations that make it difficult for you to move around, travel, or come into an office, online counselling removes those barriers, making it easier for you to get the guidance you need.
  • Reduced stigma: some people experience stigma in seeking therapy services. If you’re uncomfortable with being seen in counselling, distance therapy can be a solution to those feelings, while providing the help and services you seek.
  • Convenience: you can participate in remote counselling from wherever it is most comfortable and convenient for you. No more time spent travelling back and forth to appointments or sitting in waiting rooms. It can all be done from the comfort of your home.
  • Affordability: you get to pocket the money and save the time that would otherwise be spent on travel expenses commuting to your appointments.
  • Online disinhibition effect: when interactions that are usually done face-to-face happen online, people often feel free from social restrictions and their inhibitions. This tends to make it easier to open up and be vulnerable.

The challenges of online therapy

Although there are many advantages to online therapy, it does come with its own set of disadvantages as well. Here are some difficulties associated with Telehealth counselling:

  • Lacking in-person connection: similar to how sending a card doesn’t have the same effect as bringing good tidings in person, online therapy isn’t the same as sharing face-to-face interactions. If you thrive on that face-to-face interpersonal connection, online counselling may not be the right option for you.
  • Technology: whereas in-person therapy only requires you to show up at the therapist’s office, online counselling requires internet, a device, and the app used for conducting the video call. Not knowing how to use or navigate this technology can make online therapy harder for some people, particularly older folks. The technology not working correctly can also disrupt or end an entire session on occasion.
  • Missing non-verbal nuances: a lot of our daily communication is based on non-verbal cues. However, if you can only see the other person’s face, or they’re too far from their microphone, you miss a lot of nuanced communication from body language, physical gestures, and subtle verbal cues. However, your online therapist will be aware of this and will help you set up the video call in a way so they can get the most non-verbal information from you in the session.
  • Due diligence: with online counselling, particularly if you’re starting with a new counsellor, there is no context to inform you of the ethical practices or qualifications of the professional. You may not be able to see their certification on the wall, or whether they are alone in the room to keep your confidentiality. You must practice due diligence. Ask questions and do your homework to make sure they’re adhering to ethical standards before you engage in online therapy services.

The takeaway

Isolation in the wake of COVID-19 doesn’t have to mean an interruption in your counselling. Online therapy using video conferencing is an alternative way to continue your therapy sessions while remaining safely at home. Although online counselling may not be the right fit for everyone, it will be an effective and viable option for many people.

For those who find the technology of video calls too stressful or difficult, telephone calls may be an option as well. Discuss different distance therapy options with your therapist to find a solution that works for you.

Do you need relationship help?

Clinton Power now provides all counselling services online via Zoom video conferencing. If you need help with starting or maintaining a relationship, contact Clinton Power + Associates on (02) 8968 9323 to find out how we can help.

The post The Benefits and Challenges of Online Therapy appeared first on Clinton Power + Associates.


COVID-19: How to Manage Relationship Stress and Cope with Social Isolation

Coronavirus or COVID-19 is changing how our day-to-day lives look. With borders shut down, domestic and international flights cancelled, and non-essential businesses closed, it’s a difficult adjustment to the freedoms and liberties we’re used to enjoying. Quarantine and self-isolation, although necessary for everyone’s health and safety, can be challenging and stressful. Isolating yourself from friends […] The post COVID-19: How to Manage Relationship Stress and Cope...

COVID-19 social isolation

Coronavirus or COVID-19 is changing how our day-to-day lives look. With borders shut down, domestic and international flights cancelled, and non-essential businesses closed, it’s a difficult adjustment to the freedoms and liberties we’re used to enjoying. Quarantine and self-isolation, although necessary for everyone’s health and safety, can be challenging and stressful.

Isolating yourself from friends and family without compromising your mental health is an important step. Isolation can be a difficult time for your relationship as well; you will go from having a positive balance of time and space spent with your partner to either seeing them 24/7 or not seeing them at all.

Learning or implementing some new skills or practices in your relationships and daily lives will help to navigate this new set of circumstances successfully.

Coping with the emotional stress

From fear and anxiety to frustration and boredom, the emotional burdens of protecting yourself from a global virus seem endless. Fortunately, there are ways of alleviating these stresses, allowing you to use your emotional resources in ways that work for you rather than against you.

Here are 4 ways to cope with emotional stress during the COVID-19 pandemic:

1. Listen to credible sources of information

Not every piece of news you hear is going to be true or accurate. Make sure you’re receiving your news from reliable sources, such as reputable news stations and news channels. Social media, although great for keeping in touch with people and sharing thoughts and ideas, is not a credible source of news. What people share on social media is often opinions and not facts. If you’re not sure, double-check your sources. You can do this by finding 3 credible sources that are sharing the same information.

2. Stay in (distance) communication with others

It can be stressful being away from loved ones during a time of crisis. Understandably, you want to know that your family and friends are safe and well. This is a time to embrace methods of distance communication. Pick up the phone and call your loved ones, send emails, send text messages, and use a video chat application such as Skype, FaceTime, or Zoom. Just because you’re not in the same space doesn’t mean that you can’t be in touch.

3. Find stress-relieving activities

With this much change happening in your life, it’s inevitable that you will feel stressed. Do activities designed to alleviate that tension: meditate, do yoga, journal, exercise indoors, have sex, or read a book. Anything you usually do to relieve stress, try to do at least one of those activities a day. Remember, it’s essential to take care of your mental health, too.

4. Acceptance of your emotions during this period

Accept your feelings for what they are right now and know that they won’t last forever. It’s essential to manage your stress and anxiety and not let your emotions overwhelm you. If you do feel flooded, take a time-out, and practice self-soothing strategies.

How to deal with self-isolation

Isolation is a significant change from your regular life. In addition to managing your emotional stress, you must also deal with very different living circumstances. Many of us will be in isolation with our families or partners, and confinement can be very challenging in a small space with others.

In the wake of COVID-19, some people are choosing self-isolation, staying at home and avoiding others. Social distancing is another practice to ensure enough distance is maintained between people so as not to transmit the virus. Here are some more ways to make isolation successful and easier on everyone:

  • Spend some quality time together without devices. People are social creatures, and although we can’t go outside or be part of large social groups right now, we still have a small social group in our own homes. Spend time together and interact with one another. There’s no replacement for in-person social contact, even if our devices and social media make a close second. Take some time to put those devices down and connect.
  • Have designated quiet space for completing work. If you’re working from home, have a designated area for completing this work. Make sure it’s a quiet space without distractions so that you can be productive there. If quiet space is hard to come by in your home, try using noise-cancelling headphones to reduce noise. Have a designated time for work and a designated time for breaks. This time management is beneficial for your work/life balance as well as checking in with those at home.
  • Do individual activities as well. While it’s essential to spend quality time together, it’s crucial to have time for yourself as well. If it’s hard to get away from each other in your home, schedule time for individual activities. That way, even if you’re in the same space, you’re still doing your own thing. This is a great time to start work on a project that you’ve been putting off forever.
  • Discuss any stressful emotions together. Many stressful emotions come up during these times. Whether you’re anxious and worried, frustrated, or scared, talk about these emotions together. Expressing how you feel is a great way to let go of stress as well as understanding each other better. Make sure everyone gets a turn to talk, and if it’s not your turn, make sure that you’re listening carefully.
  • Accept that there will be some conflict. You will eventually get on each other’s nerves. That’s okay. It’s important not to avoid conflict, instead focus on repairing the conflict quickly when it does happen. Pay attention to and take care of each other rather than provoking one another. Remember, this is a stressful situation for everyone, and people deal with stress in different ways.

Listen to my interview on ABC triple j radio where I speak about how to survive self-isolation alone or with a partner.

Good boundaries can help

If you’re in isolation with your partner, this comes with its own set of challenges. Maintaining a romantic relationship when constantly sharing time and space can be difficult. Setting some boundaries can help:

  • Balance time together and time apart. Even if it’s just in a separate room, make a point of having designated time alone as well as time together. This ensures you get downtime to yourself and quality time together. Balancing both needs is important in how you distribute your time. Note that quality time is different from housekeeping activities around the home.
  • Have set times not to consume news and social media in your house. Don’t spend more than an hour a day listening to the news, as this increases fear and anxiety. Instead, have a designated news/social media time in the day. This way, you get the daily news and social input in moderation.
  • Practice being a good listener and supporter. When sharing your stress and anxiety about COVID-19 or isolation, be an active listener and offer support to your partner. Offer an empathetic ear rather than trying to ‘fix’ your partner.

Watch my interview below with Sydney therapist Jacqueline Stone about how to manage COVID anxiety.

The takeaway

As an unprecedented pandemic, COVID-19 has created a stressful situation for everyone and living in isolation is hard. It’s imperative to protect yourself and your loved ones from the virus. The best way to do that is to self-isolate and practice social distancing. This is an opportunity to find creative ways to maintain your connection.

Do you need relationship help?

If you need help with starting or maintaining a relationship, contact Clinton Power + Associates on (02) 8968 9323 to discuss your situation and find out how we can help.

 

 

Jacqueline StoneAbout Jacqueline Stone
Jacqueline Stone is a Counsellor and Therapist who has been in private practice since 2003. She and her three associates have a busy practice helping clients in their Sydney CBD office, as well as interstate and overseas via video conference and telephone calls. Jacqueline helps her clients to overcome painful stress in their lives. Her expert care guides them through their experiences of stress, depression, anxiety and trauma, to achieve recovery and thrive. Find out more about her practice at Jacqueline Stone & Associates.

 

The post COVID-19: How to Manage Relationship Stress and Cope with Social Isolation appeared first on Clinton Power + Associates.


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