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Region : United States : Indiana

Indiana is a U.S. state located in the Midwestern and Great Lakes regions of North America. Indiana is the 38th largest by area and the 16th most populous of the 50 United States. Its capital and largest city is Indianapolis.


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Indiana Latest News

ISDH: 963 new COVID-19 cases; 33 more deaths

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — New COVID-19 data has been released by the Indiana State Department of Health. ISDH says 963 more Hoosiers have tested positive for COVID-19. Those tests were recorded between Dec. 26 and Feb. 25. A total of 660,071 Hoosiers have tested positive for COVID-19. ISDH says 33 more Hoosiers have died from COVID-19. [...] The post ISDH: 963 new COVID-19 cases; 33 more deaths appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana...

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — New COVID-19 data has been released by the Indiana State Department of Health.

ISDH says 963 more Hoosiers have tested positive for COVID-19. Those tests were recorded between Dec. 26 and Feb. 25.

A total of 660,071 Hoosiers have tested positive for COVID-19.

ISDH says 33 more Hoosiers have died from COVID-19. The deaths occurred from Dec. 22 to Feb. 25.

A total of 12,098 Hoosiers have died from COVID-19. Another 433 “probable” deaths have occurred but a positive test is not on record.

The 7-day positivity rate for unique individuals stands at 11%. The 7-day positivity rate for all tests is 4%.

There are currently 781 Hoosiers hospitalized with COVID-19.

A total of 7,942,952 tests have been administered to 3,106,426 Hoosiers.

ISDH says 963,225 Hoosiers have received the first of two doses of their vaccinations, and 531,962 Hoosiers are fully vaccinated.

To register for a vaccine appointment, click here.

According to the Regenstrief Institute, 431,289 Hoosiers are estimated to have recovered from the virus.

According to the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, there have been more than 113,144,000 confirmed cases worldwide, with more than 63,860,000 recoveries and more than 2,510,000 deaths.

More information, including interactive graphs, can be found here.

Coronavirus links

Indiana coronavirus timeline

With information from the Indiana Department of Health through Feb. 24, 2021, this timeline reflects updated tallies of deaths and positive tests prior to that date.

  • March 6, 2020: Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) confirms the first case in Indiana. Officials say the Marion County resident had recently traveled to Boston to attend a BioGen conference as a contractor.
  • March 8: ISDH confirms a second case. An adult in Hendricks County who had also traveled to the BioGen conference was placed in isolation. Noblesville Schools say a parent and that parent’s children will be self-quarantining after attending an out-of-state event where someone else tested positive.
  • March 9: Avon Community School Corp. says a student on March 8 tested positive.
  • March 10: ISDH launches an online tracker. Ball State University basketball fans learn the Mid-American Conference tourney will have no fans in the stands. Three businesses operating nursing homes in Indiana announce they will no longer allow visitors.
  • March 11: The Indianapolis-based NCAA announces the Final Four basketball tournaments will be conducted with essential staff and limited family attendance. The Big Ten announces all sports events, including the men’s basketball tournament at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, will have no fans starting March 12. Ball State University suspends in-person classes the rest of the spring semester. NBA suspends all games, including the Indiana Pacers, until further notice. Butler University and the University of Indianapolis extend spring break, after which they will have virtual classes.
  • March 12: Gov. Eric Holcomb announces new protections that led to extended public school closings and the cancellation of large events across the state. The NCAA cancels its basketball tournaments. The Big Ten suspends all sporting events through the winter and spring seasons. The league including the Indy Fuel hockey team suspends its season. Indy Eleven says it will reschedule four matches. Indianapolis’ annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade is canceled. 
  • March 13: The Indiana High School Athletic Association postpones the boys basketball tournament. Wayzata Home Products, a Connersville cabinet maker, shuts down and lays off its entire workforce due to market uncertainty. Gov. Holcomb announces actions including the elimination of Medicaid co-pays for COVID-19 testing and the lifting of limits on the number of work hours per day for drivers of commercial vehicles. Franklin College says it will begin online classes March 18 and empty residence halls of students in two days. The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis closes indefinitely. The Indianapolis Public Library joins other libraries across Indiana and closes all facilities indefinitely.
  • March 14: The Indiana Gaming Commission says all licensed gaming and racing operations will close in two days for an indefinite period.
  • March 15: Indiana had its first death. St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis announces it will suspend all elective, non-urgent surgeries.
  • March 16: Indiana had its second death. Gov. Holcomb announced the first Hoosier death. He closes bars, restaurants and nightclubs to in-person patrons, but maintains carryout and delivery services.
  • March 17: Indiana had its third and fourth deaths. ISDH announces Indiana’s second death. Indiana’s Catholic bishops cancel masses indefinitely. Gov. Holcomb activates the National Guard. Purdue, Butler and Indiana State universities cancel May commencement ceremonies.
  • March 18: Indiana had its fifth death. Eli Lilly and Co. says it will use its labs to speed up testing in Indiana. The 500 Festival suspends all events. Simon Property Group closes all malls and retail properties.
  • March 19: Gov. Holcomb extends Indiana’s state of emergency into May. Holcomb says he’ll close all K-12 public and nonpublic schools. Standardized testing was canceled. The state’s income-tax and corporate-tax payment deadline was extended to July 15. Holcomb says the state will waive job search requirements for people applying for Temporary Assistance to Needy Families. The IHSAA Boys Basketball State Tournament was canceled. The Marion County Emergency Operations Center upgrades to Level 1 status.
  • March 20: Indiana’s death toll rose to 9. ISDH announces Indiana’s third death. Gov. Holcomb moves the state’s primary election to June 2. Indiana University says it is postponing May commencement ceremonies on all campuses.
  • March 21: Indiana’s death toll rises to 14. ISDH announces Indiana’s fourth death. Indiana National Guard says it and the Department of Transportation are distributing medical supplies to hospitals.
  • March 22: Indiana’s death toll rises to 18. ISDH announces seven deaths.
  • March 23: Indiana’s death toll rises to 23. Holcomb orders Hoosiers deemed nonessential to “stay at home” from March 24-April 7. Eli Lilly & Co. begins drive-thru testing for the coronavirus for health care workers with a doctor’s order. Ball State University cancels the May commencement.
  • March 24: Indiana’s death toll rises to 28. Fred Payne of Indiana Workforce Development says any Hoosiers out of work, including temporary layoffs, are eligible to apply for unemployment benefits.
  • March 25: Indiana’s death toll rises to 33. Indianapolis Motor Speedway announces the Indianapolis 500 is moved to Aug. 23.
  • March 26: Indiana’s death toll rises to 42.
  • March 27: Indiana’s death toll rises to 45.
  • March 28: Indiana’s death toll rises to 58.
  • March 29: Indiana’s death toll rises to 77.
  • March 30: Indiana’s death toll rises to 91.
  • March 31: Indiana’s death toll rises above 100, to 112. Gov. Holcomb extends the limits of bars and restaurants to offer only “to go” and “carryout” through April 6. Indiana health commissioner Dr. Kristina Box, asked about when Indiana will be in a surge of COVID-19 cases, says she thinks the surge is starting.
  • April 1: Officials extend Marion County’s “stay at home” order through May 1. Marion County health officials say they will start COVID-19 testing services for front-line employees.
  • April 2: The state announces K-12 schools will be closed for the rest of the school year. The Indiana High School Athletic Association cancels spring sports seasons.
  • April 3: Gov. Holcomb extends the “stay at home” order through April 20. The state receives a federal Major Disaster Declaration for all 92 counties. The Indiana National Guard says it, the Army Corps of Engineers and state health officials will begin to assess sites for alternate health care facilities.
  • April 4: Indiana’s death toll rises above 200.
  • April 6: The state reports a Madison County nursing home has had 11 deaths. Gov. Holcomb extends the “stay at home” order through April 20. He also limits additional businesses to carry-out only.
  • April 7: Indiana’s death toll rises above 300. Indiana health commissioner Box says four long-term care facilities have 22 deaths that appear to be related to COVID-19.
  • April 10: ISDH said 24 residents of a long-term care facility in Madison County have died from COVID-related illness.
  • April 11: Indiana’s death toll rises above 400.
  • April 14: Indiana’s death toll rises above 500.
  • April 16: Indiana records more than 10,000 positive coronavirus tests. The governor says he expects Indiana to experience a reopening in early May.
  • April 17: The governor says that he will extend the “stay at home” order through May 1.
  • April 20: Gov. Holcomb extends the “stay at home” order to May 1. The governor also says, if the medical supply chain is in good shape, other elective medical procedures can resume April 27.
  • April 22: The Tyson facility in Logansport voluntarily closes so 2,200 employees can be tested for COVID-19.
  • April 24: The Indianapolis City-County Council approves $25 million to help small businesses. Fishers City Council creates a city health department with a plan to test every resident.
  • April 25: ISDH says it will launch an antibody testing study for Hoosiers; thousands of residents were randomly selected to participate in the study.
  • April 27: Indiana’s death toll rises above 1,000.
  • April 28: Indiana officials say they will open COVID-19 testing to more Hoosiers, with expanded criteria and new testing services at 20 sites around the state.
  • April 29: The state says it will spent $43 million on contact tracing.
  • April 30: Indianapolis extends its stay-at-home order through May 15.
  • May 1: Gov. Holcomb announces a phased reopening plan for the state of Indiana. He also extends the stay-at-home order to May 4.
  • May 3: Indiana records more than 20,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • May 4: Indiana enters Stage 2 of its Back on Track plan, which excludes Cass County until May 18, and Lake and Marion counties until May 11.
  • May 6:The state begins testing for all Hoosiers at 20 sites, with plans to expand the number of sites to 50 in a week. Ivy Tech Community College says it will continue virtual classes when summer courses begin in June. 
  • May 8: Cris Johnston, director of the Office of Budget and Management, says the state missed out on nearly $1 billion in anticipated April revenues; all state agencies will be given budget-cutting goals. Purdue University OKs plans to reopen for the fall semester with social distancing and other safety measures.
  • May 13: The first phase of a state-sponsored study of the coronavirus estimated about 186,000 Hoosiers had COVID-19 or the antibodies for the novel virus by May 1. Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett announced plans for limited reopenings of worship services, retail establishments, libraries and restaurants.
  • May 15: Simon Property Group reopens Castleton Square Mall, Circle Centre Mall, and Fashion Mall at Keystone
  • May 18: Indiana reports its first case of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in a child. The Farbest Foods turkey-processing plant in Huntingburg is closed for three days; 91 people had tested positive there.
  • May 21: Indiana records more than 30,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • May 22: Indiana advances to Stage 3 of the Back on Track reopening plan. Indianapolis closes portions of five streets to allow restaurants to reopen with outdoor dining only.
  • May 26: Indiana’s death toll rises above 2,000.
  • May 27: Indiana University says the fall semester will have in-person and online courses, plus an adjusted calendar through May 2021. Ball State University says the fall semester will be 13 straight weeks of in-person classes with no day off on Labor Day and no fall break.
  • May 29: Places of worship in Marion County can begin holding indoor services at 50% capacity with proper social distancing. Jim Schellinger, Indiana secretary of commerce, said the federal Paycheck Protection Program has made 73,430 loans in Indiana totaling $9,379,164,461, the federal Economic Injury Disaster Loan program has made 5,070 loans in Indiana totaling $445,428,500, and the federal Economic Injury Disaster Loans Advance program has made 38,365 grants in Indiana totaling $136,554,000.
  • June 1: Marion County restaurants begins serving customers indoors and outdoors with 50% capacity. Marion County salons, tattoo parlors reopen by appointment only. Marion County gyms, fitness centers and pools reopen with 50% capacity and no contact sports. However, a Marion County curfew that began the night of May 31 and continued into the morning of June 3 after rioting impacted the reopening of some businesses.
  • June 3: Phase 2 of statewide testing of random Hoosiers by the Indiana University Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI and the Indiana State Department of Health begins.
  • June 5: Indiana reports May tax revenues were 20% short of projections made before the coronavirus closings started.
  • June 8: Indianapolis leaders agree to spend $79 million in coronavirus relief funding on contact tracing, rent relief, personal protective equipment and support for small businesses.
  • June 12: Indiana, excluding Marion County, advances to Stage 4 of reopening plan.
  • June 15: Casinos and parimutuel racing reopen in the state. Marion County’s public libraries begin a phased reopening.
  • June 19: Marion County advances to Stage 4 of state’s reopening plan.
  • June 24: The governor says the state’s moratorium on the eviction on renters will be extended through July. Indiana announces it will create a rental assistance program July 13. Indiana Pacers guard Malcolm Brogdon says he has tested positive for COVID-19.
  • June 27: Indiana hospitalizations for COVID-19 begin to increase, with about 33 new patients a day through July 1.
  • July 1: The governor pauses Stage 5 final reopening plan, announces Stage 4.5 from July 4-17.
  • July 4: Indiana’s Stage 4.5 reopening plan begins.
  • July 9: Indiana records more than 50,000 positive coronavirus tests. Marion County mandates mask-wearing.
  • July 10: Indianapolis Public Schools announces its reopening plans.
  • July 11: Indy Eleven resumes 2020 season with victory at Lucas Oil Stadium. The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis reopens.
  • July 13: Indiana begins rental assistance program for all counties but Marion County. Marion County begins its own rental assistance program.
  • July 15: Indiana announces the Stage 4.5 reopening plan will continue another two weeks. The WNBA season begins.
  • July 16: Indianapolis suspends applications for its rental assistance program due to overwhelming demand.
  • July 24: Bars, taverns and nightclubs in Indianapolis are shut down again. City officials also return to other previous restrictions.
  • July 25: Indiana Fever begins WNBA season after delays.
  • July 27: Indiana governor’s order to wear face coverings begins. Great Lakes Valley Conference, which including University of Indianapolis, postpones most fall sports, including football, men’s and women’s soccer, and volleyball, until spring.
  • July 30: NBA season resumes.
  • Aug. 4: Indianapolis Motor Speedway announces the Aug. 23 Indianapolis 500 will be run without fans.
  • Aug. 5: With more than 1,000 positive tests reported in a single day, Indiana jumps to a total of 70,993 positive coronavirus tests.
  • Aug. 10: Indiana records more than 75,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • Aug. 11: Indiana’s death toll rises above 3,000.
  • Aug. 17: Indianapolis Public Schools restarts with online-only classes. News 8 learns the 2021 NBA All-Star Game will not happen on Presidents Day weekend in 2021.
  • Aug. 20: Purdue University suspends 36 students after a party at a co-op.
  • Aug. 21: Indiana high school football season begins with some teams not playing due to COVID-19 concerns.
  • Aug. 23: Butler University tells undergraduates that instruction will occur remotely for the first two weeks of the semester, starting Aug. 24, instead of in classrooms.
  • Aug. 24: Purdue, Indiana, IUPUI and Ball State universities resume in-person classes.
  • Aug. 25: Reports say a fraternity, a sorority and a cooperative house at Purdue University are under quarantines.
  • Aug. 26: Gov. Holcomb extends the mask mandate through Sept. 25. Indiana’s rental assistance program will take applications for one last day.
  • Aug. 27: Indiana University says eight Greek houses are under 14-day quarantines.
  • Sept. 2: Indiana University tells 30 Greek houses in Bloomington to quarantine.
  • Sept. 6: Indiana records more than 100,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • Sept. 8: Marion County allows bars and nightclubs to reopen with 25% capacity indoors and 50% capacity outdoors.
  • Sept. 12: The Indianapolis Colts open their season with a loss in a Jacksonville stadium with a limited number of fans.
  • Sept. 21: The Indianapolis Colts home opener is limited to 2,500 fans.
  • Sept. 23: Gov. Eric Holcomb extends the mask mandate through Oct. 17.
  • Sept. 24: The state’s mask mandate is extended through Oct. 17.
  • Sept. 25: The Mid-American Conference announces it will start a six-game football season Nov. 4, with the championship game Dec. 18 or 19.
  • Sept. 26: Indiana advances to a revised Stage 5 of Indiana Back on Track plan with relaxed limits on gatherings, restaurants, bars, nightclubs and more. Marion, Monroe and Tippecanoe counties decided to have more restrictive limits, however.
  • Sept. 27: The Indianapolis Colts second home game is limited to 7,500 fans.
  • Sept. 28: Purdue University says it’s suspended 14 students, including 13 student-athletes, for violations of a pledge designed to curb the coronavirus pandemic on campus.
  • Sept. 30: The Indiana State Department of Health’s online coronavirus dashboard began showing data on positive coronavirus cases in Indiana schools.
  • Oct. 1: IU’s website shows two additional fraternities and a sorority at the Bloomington campus have been issued “cease and desist” orders.
  • Oct. 2: Franklin College suspends classes and moves to virtual education and activities through Oct. 9 after a “concerning and unusual” increase in the positivity rate for COVID-19.
  • Oct. 12: Franklin College returns to in-person classes.
  • Oct. 13: Indianapolis-based drugmaker Lilly pauses its trial of a combination antibody treatment for coronavirus for safety reasons.
  • Oct. 14: Indiana health commissioner Dr. Kristina Box announces she has tested positive for COVID-19.
  • Oct. 15: Gov. Holcomb issues executive order to extend mask mandate and Stage 5 reopening plan.
  • Oct. 16: Indiana’s death toll rises above 4,000.
  • Oct. 18: The Indianapolis Colts third home game was limited to 12,500 fans.
  • Oct. 23: The Big Ten begins its football season.
  • Oct. 30: Gov. Holcomb extends the public health emergency through Dec. 1.
  • Nov. 1: Indiana National Guard to begin deploying to long-term care facilities to provide coronavirus assistance.
  • The Mid-American Conference football teams begins its six-game regular season.
  • Nov. 5: Indiana records more than 200,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • Nov. 8: The Indianapolis Colts fourth home game was limited to 12,500 fans. .
  • Nov. 11: Indiana’s death toll rises above 5,000.
  • Nov. 12: Indianapolis calls for schools to go to virtual learning by Nov. 30.
  • Nov. 15: Indiana adds coronavirus-control restrictions for all businesses and gatherings in counties with the highest number of new cases as part of an update to the statewide COVID-19 pandemic response.
  • Nov. 16: Indianapolis limits capacity inside bars, private clubs, fraternal organizations and gyms to 25%; inside restaurants, libraries, funeral homes, swimming pools and shopping malls’ food courts to 50%; and inside religious services to 75%. Marion County Health Department requires preregistration for COVID-19 testing after increased demand at three drive-thru locations.
  • Nov. 22: Indiana records more than 300,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • Nov. 23: Indianapolis Public Schools returns to virtual learning through Jan. 18.
  • Nov. 24: The NCAA men’s and women’s basketball seasons begin; some games had no fans in the stands.
  • Nov. 25: Indiana’s death toll rises above 6,000.
  • Nov. 26: Butler University men’s basketball cancels Nov. 29 game against Eastern Illinois after a positive COVID-19 test.
  • Nov. 28: Butler University men’s basketball team postponed two more games because of a positive COVID-19 test.
  • Dec. 1: Bankers Life Fieldhouse hosts its first NCAA men’s basketball game, Kansas vs. Kentucky, since the start of the pandemic.
  • Dec. 2: Indianapolis ends its rental assistance program.
  • Dec. 5: The men’s basketball game of No. 1 Gonzaga and No. 2, Baylor at Bankers Life Fieldhouse is postponed 90 minutes before tipoff after two Bulldogs test positive.
  • Dec. 7: Indiana’s death toll rises above 7,000.
  • Dec. 9: Indiana records more than 404,000 positive coronavirus tests. Gov. Holcomb says virus restrictions will now by county based on ratings that show the local virus spread. Indiana and Purdue universities cancel the Old Oaken Bucket football game set for Dec. 12.
  • Dec. 10: Indiana House Speaker Todd Huston tested positive for COVID-19.
  • Dec. 11: The Pacers lose to the Cavaliers as the NBA preseason begins. The Carmel Walmart in Westfield closes for nearly two days to sanitize the store.
  • Dec. 12: Ball State University President Geoffrey Mearns tests positive for the coronavirus.
  • Dec. 14: Health care workers receive the first coronavirus vaccinations in Indiana.
  • Dec. 15: Vice President Mike Pence holds a roundtable in Bloomington at pharmaceutical maker Catalent on the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines. Indiana and Purdue again cancel the Old Oaken Bucket football game that’d been reset for Dec. 18.
  • Dec. 17: Indiana’s death toll rises above 8,000.
  • Dec. 20: The Indianapolis Colts allows up to 10,000 attendees at Lucas Oil Stadium for the team’s game against the Houston Texans.
  • Dec. 22: NBA starts league’s 75th season, delayed and shortened to a 72-game schedule because of the pandemic.
  • Dec. 23: In response to the high volume of unemployment claims, Holcomb extends the suspension of certain requirements to expedite the hiring and training of temporary workers to more quickly resolve unemployment issues. Indiana Pacers to host first home game against New York Knicks with no fans present.
  • Dec. 27: Indiana’s death toll rises above 9,000.
  • Dec. 28: Indiana records more than 500,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • Dec. 31: Indiana’s death toll for 2020 is 9,436 (as recorded through Feb. 24, 2021).
  • Jan. 1, 2021: Indiana’s death toll rises above 9,500.
  • Jan. 3: The Indianapolis Colts allow 10,000 attendees at Lucas Oil Stadium for the team’s game against the Jacksonville Jaguars.
  • Jan. 4: Grades 1-12 schools in Marion County are allowed reopen to in-person learning. Perry Township Schools is the only district to reopen to in-person learning.
  • Jan. 5: Purdue and Nebraska postpone a men’s basketball game over health and safety concerns.
  • Jan. 7: Indiana’s death toll rises above 10,000.
  • Jan. 8: Hoosiers 80 and older start receiving the coronavirus vaccine.
  • Jan. 13: Hoosiers 70 and older can get the coronavirus vaccine.
  • Jan. 14: Indiana’s death toll rises above 10,500.
  • Jan. 18: NFL announces the scouting combine will not happen in Indianapolis in February.
  • Jan. 20: Indiana records more than 601,000 positive coronavirus tests. Indiana Pacers host up to 1,000 fans at a game at Bankers Life Fieldhouse for first time since pandemic began.
  • Jan. 22: Indiana’s death toll rises above 11,000.
  • Jan. 31: Indiana’s death toll rises above 11,500.
  • Feb. 1: Hoosiers 65 and older can get the coronavirus vaccine.
  • Feb. 3: Indiana’s death toll rises above 11,600.
  • Feb. 4: Indiana records more than 635,000 positive coronavirus tests. More than 1,500 coronavirus deaths were added to the Indiana State Department of Health’s dashboard after an audit found they were not recorded. News 8 learns all games for the Big Ten men’s basketball tourney will move from Chicago to Indianapolis’ Lucas Oil Stadium.
  • Feb. 5: Indiana’s death toll rises to 11,700.
  • Feb. 7: Indiana to change school protocols for classroom quarantine and contact tracing. Indiana records more than 641,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • Feb. 9: Indiana’s death toll rises above 11,800.
  • Feb. 13: Indiana’s death toll rises above 11,900.
  • Feb. 15: Indiana records more than 650,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • Feb. 16: Indiana records more than 651,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • Feb. 17: Indiana records more than 652,000 positive coronavirus tests. Indiana officials announced plans for a $448 million program to give housing assistance to Hoosiers.
  • Feb. 18: Indiana’s death toll rises above 12,000. Indiana records more than 653,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • Feb. 19: Indiana records more than 654,000 positive coronavirus tests. The NCAA says up to 25% capacity will be allowed for all rounds of the men’s basketball tourney including the Final Four. The Indianapolis Motor Speedway announces the May 30 Indianapolis 500 will have fans.
  • Feb . 20: Indiana records more than 655,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • Feb . 21: Indiana records more than 656,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • Feb. 22: Indiana records more than 657,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • Feb. 23: Indiana records more than 658,000 positive coronavirus tests. Hoosiers 60 and older can get the coronavirus vaccine.
  • Feb. 24: Indiana records more than 659,000 positive coronavirus tests.
  • Feb. 25: Capacity limits at bars, restaurants, gyms, and music venues in Marion County were adjusted after a consistent trend in the community’s COVID-19 positivity rate.
  • Feb. 28: Indiana National Guardsmen to end assistance to long-term care facilities.
  • March 1: Holcomb’s emergency declaration and mask mandate set to end.
  • March 18: NCAA men’s March Madness games, all of them at venues in Indianapolis, Bloomington and West Lafayette, to start.

The post ISDH: 963 new COVID-19 cases; 33 more deaths appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana Traffic.


A great day with a few showers this weekend!

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) -- A cold start this morning with temperatures in the mid to upper 20s with a clear sky. Should be a great afternoon with a mix of sun and clouds with highs in the upper 40s to near 50°. A few light showers move in late this evening and will be [...] The post A great day with a few showers this weekend! appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana...

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — A cold start this morning with temperatures in the mid to upper 20s with a clear sky. Should be a great afternoon with a mix of sun and clouds with highs in the upper 40s to near 50°. A few light showers move in late this evening and will be very spotty in nature. Lows will fall to the lower 40s with scattered showers overnight and early Saturday morning.

Saturday will be wet fairly early on then showers should move out mid morning. Expect to see plenty of dry time through the afternoon with high headed to the upper 50s. A second round of showers will arrive late Saturday and will linger through the morning Sunday. By Sunday afternoon showers will move out with clouds still around. Highs will top out in the upper 50s. By the end of the weekend everyone will be under a quarter of an inch of rain.

Next week looks to stay mild and quiet with highs to start off the week in the middle 40s Monday and Tuesday. Could see a chance of showers mid week with highs in the mid 50s. Unsettled next Friday with highs in the 50s with a showers.

The post A great day with a few showers this weekend! appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana Traffic.


Court docs released for 2 Indiana women charged in Capitol insurrection

WASHINGTON (WISH) -- Two Indiana women charged in connection with the Jan. 6 siege on the United States Capitol admitted on Facebook they were among some of the first people inside the Capitol building that day. READ: See the court documents Dona Bissey and Anna Morgan-Lloyd, both of the Bloomfield area, were charged with knowingly [...] The post Court docs released for 2 Indiana women charged in Capitol insurrection appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana...

WASHINGTON (WISH) — Two Indiana women charged in connection with the Jan. 6 siege on the United States Capitol admitted on Facebook they were among some of the first people inside the Capitol building that day.

Dona Bissey and Anna Morgan-Lloyd, both of the Bloomfield area, were charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Photo of Dona Bissey inside the U.S. Capitol (Provided Photo/FBI)

According to federal court documents, both Bissey and Morgan-Lloyd posted on Facebook that they were inside the Capitol on Jan. 6, with Morgan-Lloyd posting that it was the “best day ever” and Bissey posting it was “the most exciting day of my life.”

Authorities in Greene County initially recognized Morgan-Lloyd as a person who posted about the Capitol siege on Facebook when she visited the Greene County Sheriff’s Department on Jan. 22 to obtain a firearms permit, according to court documents. GCSD reviewed Morgan-Lloyd’s public Facebook posts and identified Bissey as being with her at the Capitol during the time of the riots. GCSD then alerted the FBI.

The FBI had also received tips from two other witnesses regarding Morgan-Lloyd’s and Bissey’s presence at the Capitol on Jan. 6. Law enforcement officers were able to confirm their identities by comparing their Indiana state-issued driver’s license photos to a photo of the two inside the Capitol that was posted on Facebook

Four other Hoosiers have been charged in connection with the deadly Capitol siege. Those charged include:

Additional coverage

The post Court docs released for 2 Indiana women charged in Capitol insurrection appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana Traffic.


New apartments include financial literacy class

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) -- New affordable housing at East 38th Street and Broadway Street will provide a roof over tenants' heads, but also help them keep it there. Circle City Property Management and Development (CCPMD) and the Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership are teaming up to provide financial literacy classes to all residents of "Broadway [...] The post New apartments include financial literacy class appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana...

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — New affordable housing at East 38th Street and Broadway Street will provide a roof over tenants’ heads, but also help them keep it there.

Circle City Property Management and Development (CCPMD) and the Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership are teaming up to provide financial literacy classes to all residents of “Broadway Park,” a new 40-unit apartment complex.

“It’s no secret that in Indianapolis and in places across the country there’s a tremendous housing crisis we’re dealing with,” said CCPMD principal Joe White.

He explained that on one end are people “economically well-positioned” to purchase homes, and on the other end are “people who have been forgotten.”

“What we’ve been dreaming about for Broadway Park is the opportunity to create not just a safe, affordable and quality housing for Indianapolis residents, but to also create a space for things like job training, financial literacy coaching, mental and physical health services, and ultimately be well positioned to purchase a home,” said White.

His plan is to host a financial literacy class in the community center portion of the complex, along with other classes, with the goal of helping residents eventually own their own homes.

White started writing the curriculum for the financial literacy class a few years ago because of his experience and passion for helping people reach financial independence.

“There were thousands of adults in our city and cities across the state that are hopeless. They felt like there’s a world of opportunity and there are people out there accessing jobs and training and home ownership,” said White. “These folks felt like they didn’t have access.”

He says access is key, and so insisted this property be close to IndyGo’s Red Line and the Monon Trail, as well as grocery stores, good schools, and public parks.

Several condemned buildings currently stand on the property, and White says an analysis proved the buildings cannot be saved. The new apartments will fit the style of the neighborhood, with final exterior decor to be decided by the CCMPD, Historic Watson Park, and the city of Indianapolis, he says.

The complex is scheduled to break ground in spring 2021.

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2 men killed in I-465 crash on city’s northwest side

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) -- Two men died after an interstate crash on the city's northwest side Thursday night. According to Indiana State Police, authorities were called to the westbound lanes of I-465 near Michigan Road on the city's northwest side Thursday just before midnight on reports of a crash. Arriving emergency crews found a full-size cargo [...] The post 2 men killed in I-465 crash on city’s northwest side appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana...

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — Two men died after an interstate crash on the city’s northwest side Thursday night.

According to Indiana State Police, authorities were called to the westbound lanes of I-465 near Michigan Road on the city’s northwest side Thursday just before midnight on reports of a crash.

Arriving emergency crews found a full-size cargo van had crashed into the back of a semi. Both the driver and passenger of the van were found unresponsive and trapped inside the van.

The passenger of the van, identified as Brenden Harper, 25, of Indianapolis, was pronounced dead at the scene. The driver of the van, Andrew Blackwell, 33, of Greenwood, was taken to a nearby hospital where he later died.

The driver of the semi, Raimundo Luis, of Miami, Florida, was treated and released at the scene.

Police say the semi was stopped on the right shoulder due to a mechanical issue at the time of the crash. The semi’s emergency lights were activated. Investigators say the cargo van was driven off the road and crashed into the back of the trailer.

Traffic was restricted in the westbound lanes of I-465 for four hours while investigators worked the scene. All lanes are now reopened.

An investigation into the fatal crash is ongoing.

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Vaccination ‘passports’ may open society, but inequity looms

TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) — Violet light bathed the club stage as 300 people, masked and socially distanced, erupted in gentle applause. For the first time since the pandemic began, Israeli musician Aviv Geffen stepped to his electric piano and began to play for an audience seated right in front of him. “A miracle is [...] The post Vaccination ‘passports’ may open society, but inequity looms appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana...

TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) — Violet light bathed the club stage as 300 people, masked and socially distanced, erupted in gentle applause. For the first time since the pandemic began, Israeli musician Aviv Geffen stepped to his electric piano and began to play for an audience seated right in front of him.

“A miracle is happening here tonight,” Geffen told the crowd.

Still, the reanimating experience Monday night above a shopping mall north of Tel Aviv night was not accessible to everyone. Only people displaying a “green passport” that proved they had been vaccinated or had recovered from COVID-19 could get in.

The highly controlled concert offered a glimpse of a future that many are longing for after months of COVID-19 restrictions. Governments say getting vaccinated and having proper documentation will smooth the way to travel, entertainment and other social gatherings in a post-pandemic world.

But it also raises the prospect of further dividing the world along the lines of wealth and vaccine access, creating ethical and logistical issues that have alarmed decision-makers around the world.

Other governments are watching Israel churn through the world’s fastest vaccination program and grapple with the ethics of using the shots as diplomatic currency and power.

Inside Israel, green passports or badges obtained through an app is the coin of the realm. The country recently reached agreements with Greece and Cyprus to recognize each other’s green badges, and more such tourism-boosting accords are expected.

Anyone unwilling or unable to get the jabs that confer immunity will be “left behind,” said Health Minister Yuli Edelstein.

“It’s really the only way forward at the moment,” Geffen said in an interview with The Associated Press.

The checks at the club’s doors, which admitted only those who could prove they are fully vaccinated, allowed at least a semblance of normality.

“People can’t live their lives in the new world without them,” he said. “We must take the vaccines. We must.”

The vaccine is not available to everyone in the world, whether due to supply or cost. And some people don’t want it, for religious or other reasons. In Israel, a country of 9.3 million people, only about half the adult population has received the required two doses.

There is new pressure from the government to encourage vaccinations. Israeli lawmakers on Wednesday passed a law allowing the Health Ministry to disclose information on people who have yet to be vaccinated. Under the policy, names can be released to the ministries of education, labor, social affairs and social services, as well as local governments, “with the purpose of allowing these bodies to encourage people to get vaccinated.”

The government is appealing to the emotional longing for the company of others — in Israel’s storied outdoor markets, at concerts like Geffen’s, and elsewhere.

“With the Green Pass, doors just open for you. You could go out to restaurants, work out at the gym, see a show,” read an announcement on Feb. 21, the day much of the economy reopened after a six-week shutdown.

Then it raised a question at the center of the global quest to conquer the pandemic that has hobbled economies and killed nearly 2.5 million people:

“How to get the pass? Go and get vaccinated right now.”

It’s that simple in Israel, which has enough vaccine to inoculate everyone over 16, although the government has been criticized for sharing only tiny quantities with Palestinians in the occupied West Bank and Gaza.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said this week he intends to send excess vaccine to some of the country’s allies. Israel’s attorney general said Thursday night the plan has been frozen while he reviews the legalities.

Most countries don’t have enough vaccine, highlighting the fraught ethical landscape of who can get it and how to lift the burden of COVID-19.

“The core human rights principle is equity and nondiscrimination,” said Lawrence Gostin, a Georgetown University professor and director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Center on National and Global Health Law.

“There’s a huge moral crisis in equity globally because in high income countries like Israel or the United States or the EU countries, we’re likely to get to herd immunity by the end of this year,” he said. “But for many low-income countries, most people won’t be vaccinated for many years. Do we really want to give priority to people who already have so many privileges?”

It’s a question dogging the international community as wealthier countries begin to gain traction against the coronavirus and some of its variants.

Last April, the initiative known as COVAX was formed by the WHO, with the initial goal of getting vaccines to poor countries at roughly the same time shots were being rolled out in rich countries. It has missed that target, and 80% of the 210 million doses administered worldwide have been given in only 10 countries, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said this week.

Ghana on Wednesday became the first of 92 countries to get vaccines for free through the initiative. COVAX announced that about 600,000 doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine arrived in the African nation. That’s a fraction of the 2 billion shots the WHO aims to deliver this year.

As those countries begin vaccinations, wealthier nations are starting to talk about “green passport” logistics, security, privacy and policy.

The British government said it is studying the possibility of issuing some kind of “COVID status certification” that could be used by employers and organizers of large events as it prepares to ease lockdown restrictions this year.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said the policy could cause problems.

“We can’t be discriminatory against people who, for whatever reason, can’t have the vaccine,” he said.

Many countries around Europe are scrambling to develop their own vaccine certification systems to help revive summer travel, generating a risk that different systems won’t work properly across the continent’s borders.

“I think there is huge potential for not working well together,” said Andrew Bud, CEO of facial biometrics company iProov, which is testing its digital vaccination passport technology within the U.K.’s National Health Service.

But the technical knots around vaccine passports may be the easier ones to solve, he said.

The bigger challenges “are principally ethical, social, political and legal. How to balance the fundamental rights of citizens … with the benefits to society.”

—-

Associated Press writers Danica Kirka and Kelvin Chan in London contributed.

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