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I’m a Recovering Addict, Child of an Addict and Psychology Major. I write this blog in the hopes that sharing my knowledge of addiction recovery can help people achieve a happy life in recovery. I want people to know they are not alone in this fight. This common struggle will hopefully bring us together so we can find support, in which we can gain the strength and the courage to keep fighting. I want this blog to help people understand addiction and inspire compassion within them for addicts. I hope to eliminate the discrimination and stigma of an already difficult struggle by raising awareness of the challenges addicts face, and hopefully increase people’s acceptance of them. As a society, I believe we need to stop punishing addicts and increase our harm reduction efforts.
Blog Added: December 18, 2015 11:59:16 AM
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The Importance of Aftercare Following Residential Rehab

By Gaspar Melikyan, Co-Founder Quest 2 Recovery When you think of drug or alcohol addiction as a disease, it is easier to understand the need for aftercare following rehab. Imagine suffering from a debilitating physical disease or medical condition. It is ludicrous to think that someone recovering from being impaired physically and/or psychologically could just […] The post The Importance of Aftercare Following Residential Rehab appeared first on Recovering Addict...

By Gaspar Melikyan, Co-Founder Quest 2 Recovery

When you think of drug or alcohol addiction as a disease, it is easier to understand the need for aftercare following rehab. Imagine suffering from a debilitating physical disease or medical condition. It is ludicrous to think that someone recovering from being impaired physically and/or psychologically could just waltz out of the doctor’s office and prance down the street. Of course not! Usually there are various forms of intervention laid out as an aftercare plan for the patient, such as recreational therapy, physical therapy, or occupational therapy. These post-operative supportive measures slowly guide the patient back to full functioning and strength as they recuperate.

When applying this concept to addiction recovery it is easy to see the value of aftercare interventions following completion of a residential rehab program. The person in early recovery may feel fantastic, full of optimism and ready to reclaim their lives, only to encounter old triggers when returning to their regular life. Recovery tools, such as coping skills and stress management, take time to incorporate into daily life. People do not emerge from rehab with these new habits yet formed, leaving them vulnerable to relapse.

The reality of relapse is something to take seriously. In an article published in Current Psychiatry Reports entitled New Findings on Biological Factors Predicting Addiction Relapse Vulnerability, author Rajita Sinha sites relapse rates of 65%-70% within 90 days following rehab. If there are effective measures to take to protect against relapse after rehab, why not put them in place as one of the treatment components?

What is Aftercare in Recovery?

Consider addiction treatment and recovery as an ongoing continuum of care. Starting with detox and withdrawal, followed by therapy in a residential treatment program, is only the beginning of the therapeutic process. Aftercare in addiction recovery involves various interventions that can help to solidify and support recovery, in the first year or two especially.

By engaging in activities that act as a reinforcement to sobriety, the chances of maintaining a sustained recovery are greatly increased. Individuals in early recovery will encounter speed bumps that can be emotionally overwhelming, which may lead them to reach for the substance they had worked so hard to overcome. Aftercare options provide a safety net where the individual will receive peer and professional support to help navigate these stressors. There are a variety of aftercare activities or resources that can be considered while making the recovery plan best suited to each client’s individual needs.

What Causes Relapse?

Science has not yet fully uncovered the root causes for relapse. Why is it that a third of individuals in recovery do not relapse at all, where the majority does? Trying to grasp the biological factors, genetic components, and environmental stressors that can result in addiction relapse is still an elusive task.

There are, however, some common features surrounding relapse. These may include:

  • Stress

  • Not severing relationships with those active in addiction

  • Traumatic or challenging life event

  • Losing focus on maintaining post-rehab efforts

  • Celebrations, such as weddings or office parties

  • Cravings

While relapse does not spell the end of recovery, multiple or serial relapses can erode self-confidence, induce shame and guilt, and eventually undermine recovery.

Important Aftercare Measures that Reinforce Recovery

No matter how confident a person is when completing a rehab program, it is wise to remember that it is much easier to maintain sobriety in a structured, controlled rehab environment than out in regular life. Aftercare services can help the newly recovering individual stick to the course, even in the face of stressors or triggers, and reach important recovery goals.

Here are some of the most effective and helpful aftercare strategies to incorporate into the overall recovery planning:

Sober Living Housing

There is no question that returning to a home environment that is unsupportive or hostile towards your recovery is a recipe for relapse. If the home setting involves individuals who openly use drugs and alcohol or where family dysfunction creates excessive stress, it is not conducive to a lasting recovery. A sober living environment offers a supportive home setting that is free of substances, allowing the person fresh out of residential treatment to practice using recovery tools and stabilizing before returning to home life.

Outpatient Therapy

Regularly scheduled talk therapy and/or group therapy sessions provides a consistent source of ongoing support in recovery. After an inpatient rehab program where constant psychological support was available, the individual is sure to hit some snags as they transition back to community, family, and work. Having someone available to talk things over with, or from whom to learn more targeted coping skills, can be an essential tool in the first year or two of recovery.

Recovery Communities

Peer support is a significant element in a successful aftercare strategy. The most recognized recovery groups are 12-step programs such as A.A. or N.A. These groups are widely available across the country and free of cost. If the 12-step philosophy is not aligned with personal beliefs, there are other non 12-step groups available such as SMART Recovery, Women for Sobriety, Secular Organizations for Sobriety (S.O.S.), and LifeRing Secular Recovery.

Family Counseling

In many cases, family issues may be factors that contributed to the use of drugs or alcohol and must be examined and treated if there is to be lasting sobriety. Once dysfunctional relating is identified through family therapy sessions, the therapist can offer specific strategies for improving communication skills, anger management, and conflict resolution. Family counseling also helps families rebuild trust and overcome anger and resentment caused by the addiction.

Managing a Dual Diagnosis

A significant number of people struggle with both addiction and a co-occurring mental health disorder, called a dual diagnosis. This may have been identified and somewhat treated during rehab, but follow up care with a psychiatrist who can manage medications for a coexisting mood disorder, as well as provide psychotherapy, will be beneficial to the success of recovery.

About the Author

Gaspar Melikyan is the co-founder of Quest 2 Recovery located in Lancaster, California. At Quest 2 Recovery, we have a team of competent professionals whose expertise, experience, and dedication are guaranteed to satisfy the needs of all of our clients. Our team of doctors, psychotherapists, nurses, and other healthcare professionals have unparalleled expertise in treating drug and alcohol addiction, as well as psychological disorders that commonly accompany substance abuse. They are responsible for creating and implementing an individual treatment plan that is designed to address and treat clients’ unique psychological and physical needs.

The post The Importance of Aftercare Following Residential Rehab appeared first on Recovering Addict Advice.



Snorting Fentanyl: A New Trend?

The Deadman’s High Fentanyl is like an apocalyptic nightmare. If you are a fan of end-of-the-world movies, you know what I mean. Zombies and mass deaths everywhere, beyond anything we can imagine in the real world. Yet, it is happening now, right in front of us. Terrifyingly, fentanyl is being used as a replacement on […] The post Snorting Fentanyl: A New Trend? appeared first on Recovering Addict...

The Deadman’s High

Fentanyl is like an apocalyptic nightmare. If you are a fan of end-of-the-world movies, you know what I mean. Zombies and mass deaths everywhere, beyond anything we can imagine in the real world. Yet, it is happening now, right in front of us. Terrifyingly, fentanyl is being used as a replacement on the streets for heroin. Drug users are shooting up fentanyl and they are snorting fentanyl. Death counts continue to climb.

Not such a new trend after all.

Unfortunately, snorting fentanyl is not new at all. In fact, it is something of a gateway method of use that often leads to intravenous needles. It seems to be a transition between swallowing a pill and sticking a needle into a vein, making the downward spiral into serious drug use seem not as steep.

Crossing the line.

When you are using drugs, you may claim to have lines that you will not cross, no matter what. If you are used to taking pills, you may think you will never progress to buying powders and snorting them into your nose. Yet, you eventually find yourself crossing the line, and then, snorting lines of heroin or fentanyl. When you are getting high, you are not in a good state of mind to say no to trying new and more dangerous activities. Hopefully, snorting fentanyl will not be part of your story.

So, what makes snorting fentanyl so bad?

Besides damaging your nasal passages and sinuses, you are putting yourself at risk for serious side effects, such as death from not breathing. Fentanyl is super powerful, nearly 100 times as potent as morphine. In fact, it is measured in micrograms. While most opioids can kill be slowing down breathing, fentanyl is far more dangerous.

Should fentanyl be illegal?

Using fentanyl to get high is already illegal. Not to mention that fentanyl made in illicit labs is very illegal. Yet, what if the government made all fentanyl illegal? Interestingly, fentanyl happens to be very effective in preventing pain during surgery. Hence, it is used in many surgical operations each and every day. So, it is unlikely that fentanyl is going away.

In conclusion, fentanyl is a dangerous drug that has important uses in the medical field, but it must be kept off the streets because of it’s high potency and deadly risks.

 

The post Snorting Fentanyl: A New Trend? appeared first on Recovering Addict Advice.



The Magic of Telemedicine for Addiction Treatment

Facetime your doctor Or, you can use Skype, Google Hangouts, GoToMeeting or one of many other video calling apps. It can work from your phone or computer. Telemedicine is the future of medical treatment. And, it works especially well for addiction treatment! Skype your therapist In fact, many people already visit with their psychologist or […] The post The Magic of Telemedicine for Addiction Treatment appeared first on Recovering Addict...

Facetime your doctor

Or, you can use Skype, Google Hangouts, GoToMeeting or one of many other video calling apps. It can work from your phone or computer. Telemedicine is the future of medical treatment. And, it works especially well for addiction treatment!

Skype your therapist

In fact, many people already visit with their psychologist or therapist by video call. Why not? What better way to get private therapy than in the privacy of your own home or your car or wherever. Recently, I was driving with a friend and he told me that he was late for a visit with his therapist. I asked him if I should drive him there. No, he replied, he just asked that I give him some privacy in the car for a while so he could visit with her via Facetime. I walked into a grocery store to shop while my friend sat in the car for a session of psychotherapy. What an improvement in access to care, thanks to technology!

Opioid Addiction Treatment Through Telemedicine

While there are still some obstacles to providing full medical treatment with video calling, things are moving right along. Doctors are now promoting Suboxone Telemedicine Therapy on their websites. Michael A., in this excellent article, describes the nightmare of traveling across the country for addiction treatment that just didn’t work. While he did finally find a program that worked incredibly well for him, what if there were strong programs that could be provided online and through telemedicine? It is a fact that recovery works best when you are surrounded by loved ones and a strong support system. Telemedicine can deliver your care to where you live, directly. In addition to full outpatient addiction treatment, medication treatment will soon be available as well. Meds like Suboxone work very well to keep people clean from deadly opioids.

Let me know what you think about telemedicine in the comments below. I can’t wait to hear from you!

 

The post The Magic of Telemedicine for Addiction Treatment appeared first on Recovering Addict Advice.



Addicted To Rehab

The following is an article written by Michael A. It is an incredible story of how the detox/rehab system that is considered to be the standard of care is failing. We put faith in these facilities to help our loved ones to get past drug and alcohol addiction. Unfortunately, the result is more often repeated […] The post Addicted To Rehab appeared first on Recovering Addict...

The following is an article written by Michael A. It is an incredible story of how the detox/rehab system that is considered to be the standard of care is failing. We put faith in these facilities to help our loved ones to get past drug and alcohol addiction. Unfortunately, the result is more often repeated failures and cycling through the system. The only success story here is the financial gain for the owners of these detox and rehab institutions. The problem is that they are often not providing evidence-based therapy to help keep their patients clean long-term. What we need to do is be more vigilant in vetting these programs. We must expect more than a 30 day cleansing that spits out a temporarily drug-free person. Addiction is a chronic illness that requires appropriate, ongoing care. 

Six years and 28 rehabs later, I now carry 3 years of abstinence and am at a point to finally describe my journey (one that unfortunately is all too common for many young people). This is the story of how during my addiction, I fell victim to a vicious cycle of relapsing, rehab entries, and becoming a statistic for rehabs that didn’t work. Some know this cycle as “The Florida Shuffle.”

For a brief backstory, my addiction started as many commonly do – smoking weed at a young age and drinking at underage parties. I am a child of divorced parents, with a father that was absent for the majority of my life. My mom did her best and I don’t know what exactly led to me falling into drug addiction, but somewhere the variables lined up for it.

Fast forward to a 21-year-old me, crying with my mother, trying to get off of opioids and cocaine. We are searching for the best rehab online, and of course I’m looking at the first one that shows up on Google. I was sold on the pictures of people together with beachy, luxury backdrops, for 30 days of treatment (I refused to do longer, and most were only 30 anyway). My insurance covers it, and at the time I had no idea how much was being paid out, nor did I care. I knew I needed help and this looked promising. Being so lonely inside and isolated, I wanted to be around happy people in a beautiful resort. I wanted to feel happy and beautiful. I arrived, and first of all, the pictures were pretty accurate of the luxury, but not of the smiling faces.

I am befriended by a guy named “Gary” who gives me the ins and outs – basically a “welcome to rehab, here’s how to screw the system” speech. I find out that everyone is abusing their detox meds, and basically getting high for what seems like free. Many of the clients were also there only because of insurance and paid nothing out of pocket. If they did have to pay, the parents were covering costs. The first week was easy being loaded up on detox meds. I signed a lot of paper work and agreed to a treatment plan while high out of my mind. However, a lot of suffering and realizations arrive as soon as the over prescribed medications wear off. To cope with this shock, the doctors prescribe “comfort” meds and antidepressants that work like a temporary bandage. This relapse prevention technique was one that never worked for me, and only seemed to screw up my head more.

After detox we all get transferred to a structured housing area (which is agreed to during detox as the treatment plan), where residential and partial hospitalization treatment starts. This is generally how addiction treatment works. You start out in a comfortable setting with nurses present, and then start transitioning into more “realistic” living environments. Theoretically this transition phase should work. However, this housing was nothing like the 5-star detox, and nothing close to a realistic healthy environment. This was an old run-down motel in the middle of a gang ran neighborhood. It became clear to me that over 50% of the coed mix of clients were getting high, and it’s hard not to with drug dealers walking along the fences offering dope to people with ten days of sobriety. Feeling broken and insecure still, I wanted to join the in crowd. People “like” me here, especially since I am hopping the fence to get drugs for people every other day. All the girls around are hooking up with the guys, and me being so insecure, I find a lot of comfort in this. It’s all starting to make sense to me, rehab is actually pretty fun when you turn it into a party. I mean, imagine 50 people from all over the country who just want to get high put in a place where drugs are accessible and the center doesn’t care if you get high because they can bill the insurance more. It’s chaos. The schedule included a few hours of bs-ing through groups, and then night time yielded the real action. People get caught relapsing, but just get sent back to detox to get a free high for 5 days again. The therapists were not that great, and most were not in recovery themselves. There was no real knowledge being taught there. I didn’t learn how to stop relapsing; I didn’t learn how to love myself… I learned how to relapse without getting caught. This was the most cookie cutter rehab around – 12 step philosophy and groups all day. Without naming names, this rehab is now shut down, including many other money hungry rehabs in South Florida.

Standard treatment model taught me this:

  • You are a victim to a disease
  • If you’re not done you’re not done
  • AA for 90 days is a magic pill
  • Freudian Style Therapy – Something must’ve happened to cause addiction
  • Medication Assisted Treatment is the best way to overcome addiction

Honestly I was afraid to face myself and work on what I needed to internally. Without the proper confrontation and help I still felt unready to grow up and get back into the world. As miserable as this treatment was, I found a place where I had no responsibilities and could keep living my manipulative, intoxicated fantasy life. I was kind of content with this.

Finally discharged, I’m sent to a halfway house (sober living). At this point I was broken, not helped from treatment, and actually worse. I learned all about hard drugs in there, and how to use them. This brought me from being a pill addict, to craving heroin and crack. This left me wondering: “Does rehab really work?”

This sober living environment is not a treatment program. It is group housing with rules of staying sober, making curfew, going to AA meetings, and some other structure outlines. My family is convinced at this point that I needed it, and it was very true, but what I needed was more treatment. 30 days of a therapist barely getting to know me, in a coed, over packed facility was simply not enough. I met more friends at the halfway house who shared the misery I felt, and the desire to keep getting high. Everyone in charge just wants to say 30 days and AA is what you need. I was trying, but wasn’t really understanding this AA thing. I wasn’t very strong at this point. Maybe a better treatment would’ve helped, or maybe I just wasn’t ready. These thoughts simply weren’t true. With the right addiction treatment and relapse prevention plan, almost anyone, no matter how ready, can and will learn to stay in recovery from addiction. People just need the proper push and motivation.

This initial experience with treatment left a mark on me. It gave me insight into a whole new world that I had never experienced. Now I know, if I relapse, I can pull out my insurance card, head back to detox, and take a 30-day vacation from the world. My career felt to be gone, my family just wanted me to heal, and all my so-called friends were off living their lives. What better place to go than back to rehab whenever I feel broken? At least I’ll have friends there. It’s common to see people struggling with addiction shipped to a treatment mecca like South Florida to get help, and this cycle happens over and over. When you’re all alone in a new area, treatment felt like the easiest place to be accepted. I quickly learned how powerful having insurance was. With all these now known to be corrupt addiction treatment centers, I was just a well of money, and would be taken anywhere without hesitation.

So my journey continued. Rehab after rehab, relapse after relapse, sober living after sober living, more rehab, suboxone doctors, back to rehab, and on and on. I could leave rehab with some money saved up, use hard drugs on the streets for a few days, and then go right back to detox to get a free (insurance covered) high for another week. I also found sober living homes that allowed me to live there with a girl, and get high, as long as I attended their IOP program. Whenever my life would get miserable, I go back to a luxurious rehab that my insurance covers, and life seems ok again for 30 days. This whole time I do want to change, but I was not getting the right message. And my addiction changed from snorting drugs to shooting them. Unfortunately, that’s what I learned down there, how to inject drugs and scheme better.

I wasn’t sure if I was done. How could I be, I was suffering from years of drug abuse altering my brain chemistry. These “comfort” and “stabilizing” meds didn’t help. They made things worse. I started to truly believe I was doomed to go on living as a hopeless “addict.” Which brings up another point. In all these centers, when you share in groups, you address yourself as “Michael, addict” or “Michael, alcoholic.” This creates a victim mind state. I am constantly identifying myself as a disease or affliction. I started to really feel the hopelessness and burden of this lifestyle. I wanted a good life, but these centers weren’t working for me and I believed it was just me that didn’t work. All of these centers would quote the big book and blame me for not being ready. This lifestyle wasn’t working for me and I wanted to change. I had every intention after a year of this to try to actually heal. The struggle was in full effect, and the thrill left. Maybe I was what these treatment centers told me I was. A hopeless addict that wouldn’t get it until I was “ready.” Which doesn’t even make sense. If someone goes to treatment, some part of them is ready. These centers, from my experience, were lazy in helping people bring out the part of them that wanted change.

This is not the case if you find a treatment center that addresses addiction in the appropriate ways, and truly teaches someone to heal, and this is what I soon came to discover. There is recovery after repeated relapses.

I knew I needed something more, so I left Florida. I had to get away from this lifestyle of rehab hopping, and I knew somewhere, there had to be something different. Maybe somewhere, I could find a different approach to the common treatment method. From trying to meet real success stories and talking to people who have had sustained sobriety, I heard about a place in Southern California. It was a new approach to the treatment model.  What I learned was that there has been so much research these past years into addiction, and a common factor in healing is connection. I was recommended to try out a new center that followed these guidelines:

  • Team dynamic (peer centered approach)
  • Team building exercises in the mornings, then workout, eat, sleep, process and live with your team.
  • Science of the brain through addiction
  • Not normal groups on addiction, really in depth studying of what happens to the brain during drug/ alcohol use, and how to rewire through CBT, DBT, and exercise.
  • Strong motivational interviewing – A form of therapy
  • Exercise 5 days a week
  • Not only do you heal your body, you rewire your prefrontal cortex and create homeostatic balance in the brain.
  • Yoga and mindfulness to build self-awareness and a connection between mind and body
  • Peer centered groups every night for checking in.
  • Longer than 90 days
  • No phones or social media for first couple months to truly focus on oneself
  • Single Sex
  • No temptation to engage in relationships, just camaraderie.
  • An entirely new healthy lifestyle.
  • Trips to do mud runs, 5k’s, triathlons, camping and other events every month to realize how much greater life can be.
  • Language of empowerment
  • We did not address ourselves in as addicts. The whole program was based around becoming an optimized human being who overcame addiction.

One thing that also stood out about this treatment center was the fact that not everyone got in. You had to show a willingness and go through an interview process with the team there. No matter the insurance or money I had to offer, if they didn’t think I was there for the right reasons I would’ve been denied. This in itself opened up my mind to committing whole heartedly to this place. Almost as if I was challenged.

This recipe of real therapy and physical healing was what I needed. I entered this new program believing I still couldn’t heal. I didn’t feel “ready.” But the amount of love and happiness in a place like this was contagious. It was impossible for me not to heal, literally. My brain got rewired, I became an empowered, thriving human being. I found this at a place in California called Tree House Recovery. I would highly recommend exploring this place to get a good idea of what I’m referring to as real, evidence based treatment. This is the one I found that worked best for me. Ultimately, I would suggest doing the appropriate research for each individual circumstance.

This was and is my journey. I’ve seen many other young people follow the same journey I began, but what I really hope to see is more follow this second half of the journey to real healing. To find out recovery from addiction is possible.

I really thought I would never succeed, and with the way most treatments are these days, I was not going to make it. I am one of the fortunate ones who found a new approach to treatment, that focuses on healing rather than recidivism.

If you know someone struggling with addiction, whether it’s their first time looking for treatment or the 28th time (like me), look through all the options. DO NOT let them pick the easy, more aesthetically appealing route. Do not rush into the first one that will take someone. Spend the time necessary to make this the only/last treatment needed. Ask the centers you’re looking at for their success rates. The rehab that worked for me has over an 80% success rate. Rehabs do work, if you go to the right one.

To truly heal one must have a part of them ready to commit. Let’s remember, we are not choosing vacation rentals, we are saving a life. To truly save a life, you must follow the recipe that works. One that focuses on empowering someone to heal, and helping them find the foundation of success that has always been there. This is one of the toughest things to deal with and overcome, and the proper help is needed. No one can do this alone, or they will risk potential relapse. They need connection, physical healing, and real therapy from people who have proven techniques that work. A majority of these fraudulent treatment centers and sober living homes have been shut down, however a lot of them still exist. Be wary when choosing addiction treatment and extensively read reviews.

-Michael A.

The post Addicted To Rehab appeared first on Recovering Addict Advice.



Never Be Cool. Always Be Clean.

Please don’t be so cool. I see it everywhere. People want to be cool. They do various hand gestures. There’s the peace sign, the victory sign. They speak in creaking, cool voices, as if they are holding smoke in their lungs from a deep puff. They walk with cool walks. Accessories and clothing must be […] The post Never Be Cool. Always Be Clean. appeared first on Recovering Addict...

Please don’t be so cool.

I see it everywhere. People want to be cool. They do various hand gestures. There’s the peace sign, the victory sign. They speak in creaking, cool voices, as if they are holding smoke in their lungs from a deep puff. They walk with cool walks. Accessories and clothing must be so very cool.

Cool can kill.

Always be cool is the code that actively using addicts live by. They must be hip, slick and cool. If you’re not cool enough, you can’t be in the club. Nerds and geeks not welcome. unless the nerd happens to be a doctor, nurse or paramedic administering Narcan to a cool addict who is overdosing. Cool for addicts is not cool.

Always Be Clean.

A much better way to live is to always be clean. Drop the cool. It’s not worth it. The tattoos and Harleys and leather are all great, but be careful. Cool may lead you back to a relapse. Don’t be too cool to ask for help. And, don’t be too cool to share how you feel.

Always be conscious.

A friend told me this. He said that after getting clean, we should try to be conscious of what we are doing and what happens around us. Be aware. Know what triggers you. See what helps you to move forward and what might take you back. Spend your time with the people who lift you up and not those who pull you down.

It is cool to not be cool.

You can drop the cool act and still be cool. These days, being uncool is cool. It is cool to be yourself. You can be who you are and follow your dreams. It is cool to do what you like to do. Be the person you dreamed of being when you were a little kid. Don’t be cool. Be clean. Be you.

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Prone: An Amazing Short Film About Addiction By Christopher Carson Emmons

Prone is a film about two people. First, there is an artist named Michelle. Michelle dreams of getting her artwork displayed in a prominent gallery to further her art career. She meets with a man who is able to make her dream come true. Unfortunately, this opportunity comes at a price. In order to get […] The post Prone: An Amazing Short Film About Addiction By Christopher Carson Emmons appeared first on Recovering Addict...

Prone is a film about two people.

First, there is an artist named Michelle. Michelle dreams of getting her artwork displayed in a prominent gallery to further her art career. She meets with a man who is able to make her dream come true.

Unfortunately, this opportunity comes at a price.

In order to get his help, she will be forced to compromise her own values. She will have to lie to her significant other and betray him. And, to get what she wants, she will have to comply with the wishes of this man in a position of power. While Michelle will be able to attain her goal, is it worth the cost? Would it be better for her to pass on this opportunity and be able to live with herself?

Addiction to power is also an addiction.

The man who made the proposal to Michelle to display her art displayed symptoms of addiction to power. He clearly had a history of using his position of authority to gain personal satisfaction at the expense of his victims. Unfortunately, we are now seeing real life stories such as this all over the news.

Pill addiction and romance.

The second story, which runs in parallel to Michelle’s story, is about Ryan, a pill addict. Ryan goes to an addiction counseling group. In the group, he is attracted to a woman who also attends the group for addiction therapy. Sadly, Ryan has issues with addiction to romance and possibly co-dependency in addition to drug addiction.

An intriguing film, written by a master of storytelling.

Christopher Carson Emmons wrote and directed Prone. He has also produced, directed, written and edited many other excellent films. The incredible thing about this film is how relevant it is in today’s world, considering that it was released years ago. Not only are we seeing abuses of power and sexual misconduct stories in the news, drug addiction has become a national epidemic and the number one killer in the United States.

Listen to an interview with Christopher Carson Emmons.

Here, you will find a fascinating podcast interview with Mr. Emmons. He discusses the art of film making and he makes some recommendations, including a great mainstream addiction film. I highly recommend listening to this interview and I recommend watching the incredible films of Christopher Carson Emmons.

The post Prone: An Amazing Short Film About Addiction By Christopher Carson Emmons appeared first on Recovering Addict Advice.



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