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  • Will Wynn
  • February 02, 2016 06:16:42 AM
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A Little About Us

MyCarHeaven is dedicated to showcasing, talking about and reviewing the most beautiful, cool, iconic and desirable cars, classic cars, supercars and hypercars. If you are reading this, then no doubt you’ll should either own or desire a beautiful cool, iconic or desirable car, due to it's beautiful looks, superb engineering, prestige of ownership or another personal reason. MyCarHeaven is where you can find information about the cars and associated cool stuff that really matters.

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4 Tips for Working Out Your Car Budget

Whether you’re buying your first vehicle or replacing a much-loved motor, buying a new car can be an exciting prospect. Before you get started, however, you’ll want to calculate your budget carefully. To ensure you’ve got everything covered, take a look at these top tips for working out your car budget now: 1. Buying Upfront […] The post 4 Tips for Working Out Your Car Budget first appeared on My Car...

Whether you’re buying your first vehicle or replacing a much-loved motor, buying a new car can be an exciting prospect. Before you get started, however, you’ll want to calculate your budget carefully. To ensure you’ve got everything covered, take a look at these top tips for working out your car budget now:

1. Buying Upfront or Leasing?

If you’re buying a car outright, you’ll need to use your savings or access some type of funding, such as a personal loan. Alternatively, you might decide to lease a vehicle and pay in installments. If you’re going to be leasing a car or paying off a car loan, you’ll need to consider your income when you’re calculating your budget.

Once you’ve deducted your essential costs, like rent and food, from your monthly income, take a look at what you have left. This will give you a good idea of how much you can afford to spend on motoring each month.

2. Don’t Forget Insurance

The cost of car insurance can be as much as the vehicle itself, depending on your age and driving history. Due to this, it’s vital to factor insurance payments into your budget now. You can access quotes from insurance providers before you purchase a vehicle and it only takes a few seconds to get an insight into how much you’ll need to spend.

Remember – you can reduce your insurance premiums by choosing a vehicle with an impressive safety record.

3. Gas and Maintenance

If you regularly travel long distances or you use your car frequently, you can expect to spend more on gas than drivers who only use their vehicles sporadically. However, the make and model you choose can also have a big impact on how much gas you use. If you need help buying car, try searching for the perfect vehicle based on your usage and driving style. Larger engines tend to guzzle more fuel, so you can cut your costs by selecting a motor that offers better fuel efficiency.

Similarly, check the average cost of repairs and maintenance on prospective models before making a decision. Some vehicles are more time-intensive to work on and others are fitted with expensive parts, which can both increase your long-term running costs.

4. Consider an Extended Warranty

If you’re buying a brand-new vehicle, it should come with a warranty for the first three years. However, many vendors offer extended warranties that cover important extras or run for a longer period of time. Although you’ll need to pay a little more for an enhanced warranty, it can save you money and give you peace of mind.

Buying a New Vehicle

Although buying a new vehicle can be exciting, it can also feel a little stressful. Take your time to research which models suit your needs and test drive as many cars as possible to help you make the right choice. Spending more time on the purchase process could mean you’ll spend less money in the future!

The post 4 Tips for Working Out Your Car Budget first appeared on My Car Heaven.


New electric Renault 5 is the first of 14 new models due in the next five years

Renault has announced that it will transition to a cleaner and more sustainable fleet through electrified and hydrogen solutions, offering the greenest mix of vehicles in Europe by 2025. The first of these is the Renault 5 Prototype seen here. The Renault 5 Prototype is a compact city car which takes one of Renault’s timeless […] The post New electric Renault 5 is the first of 14 new models due in the next five years first appeared on My Car...

Renault has announced that it will transition to a cleaner and more sustainable fleet through electrified and hydrogen solutions, offering the greenest mix of vehicles in Europe by 2025. The first of these is the Renault 5 Prototype seen here.

The Renault 5 Prototype is a compact city car which takes one of Renault’s timeless classics and develops it to be fit for the future with a modern, 100 per cent electric twist, while retaining the character of the original. 

 “The design of the Renault 5 Prototype is based on the R5, a cult model of our heritage. This prototype simply embodies modernity, a vehicle relevant to its time: urban, electric, attractive.” said Gilles Vidal, Renault Design Director.

We will bring you more details as we get them …

The post New electric Renault 5 is the first of 14 new models due in the next five years first appeared on My Car Heaven.


125 years of ŠKODA

Václav Laurin and Václav Klement founded the company that would become ŠKODA AUTO in December 1895. The two men founded a workshop for the repair and manufacture of bicycles in Mladá Boleslav they turned to motorbikes from 1899 and finally cars from 1905. The founders were united by their passion for cycling and wanted to […] The post 125 years of ŠKODA first appeared on My Car...

Václav Laurin and Václav Klement founded the company that would become ŠKODA AUTO in December 1895. The two men founded a workshop for the repair and manufacture of bicycles in Mladá Boleslav they turned to motorbikes from 1899 and finally cars from 1905.

The founders were united by their passion for cycling and wanted to offer their customers affordable bicycles built from the best materials available. Initially three people were employed in their small workshop to make bicycles, one year later, 21 employees were making five different models of bikes, which bore the name SLAVIA. 

In 1899 they presented the first two L&K motorbikes: The SLAVIA A and B models. To make the bikes easier to operate and more stable, the engine was installed in the lower area of the frame. This positioning later became the international standard and is considered a great achievement of engineer Václav Laurin.

Václav Klement succeeded in winning large orders both on the domestic market and in industrialised countries such as Germany and Great Britain. The motor racing debut at the Paris-Berlin race in 1901 – when Narcis Podsedníček came in first by a wide margin after 1,196km – earned the company legendary status. The highlight of the motorbike era was the victory of an L&K CCR in the unofficial motorbike world championship in Dourdan near Paris on 25 June 1905.

In 1905 the company presented its first automobile: the Laurin & Klement Voiturette A. It had a one-litre, two-cylinder engine and travelled at speeds of up to 40kmh. Less than a year after entering the automobile manufacturing business, the range included a wide variety of two- and four-cylinder models. The first eight-cylinder vehicle manufactured in Europe, the Type FF was introduced in 1907. The company rose to become the largest automobile manufacturer in Austria-Hungary, exporting to several dozen markets on all continents.

Three decades later, Laurin and Klement merged with the Pilsen-based engineering group Škoda. From then on, the winged arrow in the brand logo became a symbol of speed and progress. ŠKODA AUTO soon converted its facility in Mladá Boleslav toassembly line production. 

After the Second World War, the company was nationalised. The production was expanded at the plants in Kvasiny and Vrchlabí, and the company continued to develop new models independently. The first Octavia and the Felicia were made in 1959 and in 1964 the rear-engined ŠKODA 1000 MB saloon was produced. The ŠKODA 130 RS, derived from the ŠKODA 110 R sports coupé, became one of the most successful racing and rally cars in its category from 1975 onwards, receiving the nickname “Porsche of the East”.

Volkswagen acquired ŠKODA AUTO in April 1991 and ŠKODA became the fourth brand to join the Group. 

With the plug-in hybrid model Superb iV and the all-electric Citigoe iV, ŠKODA entered the age of electromobility in 2019. The 2020 premiere of the first ŠKODA model Enyaq iV based on the Volkswagen Group’s MEB platform marks another milestone. The Enyaq iV is now the tenth model series in the brand’s range. In addition to its three Czech plants, ŠKODA AUTO also produces in China, Russia, India, Slovakia and Ukraine and is active in more than 100 markets worldwide.

The post 125 years of ŠKODA first appeared on My Car Heaven.


The Best car shows to attend in 2021

We have put together a list of the best car shows to attend in 2021. Obviously every event and planned car show will be subject to Covid-19 restrictions at the time. We are really hoping that the automotive show calendar can go ahead this year, even if its in a restricted form. There really is […] The post The Best car shows to attend in 2021 first appeared on My Car...

We have put together a list of the best car shows to attend in 2021. Obviously every event and planned car show will be subject to Covid-19 restrictions at the time. We are really hoping that the automotive show calendar can go ahead this year, even if its in a restricted form.

There really is no substitute for getting up close and personal to our favourite motoring icons!

Hopefully we will see you at some of the shows we have listed below. If you have any tips for other shows that we should add to our diaries please let us know.


London Classic Car Show

16th-18th April , Syon Park, London

www.theclassiccarshowuk.com


Donington Historic Festival

1st – 2nd May 1-2, Donington Park, East Midlands

www.doningtonhistoric.com


Goodwood 78th Members’ Meeting

15th – 16th May, Goodwood

www.goodwood.com


London Concours

8th – 10th June, The Honourable Artillery Company, London

www.londonconcours.co.uk


Practical Classics Classic Car & Restoration Show

11th – 13th June, Birmingham NEC

www.necrestorationshow.com


Carfest Retro

18th – 20th June, Bicester Heritage, Oxfordshire

www.carfest.org


Gravity

4th July, Stoneleigh Park, Warwickshire

www.gravityshow.co.uk


Goodwood Festival of Speed 

8th – 11th July 2021, Goodwood

www.goodwood.com


Hagerty Festival of the Unexceptional

New Event for Summer 2021 – TO BE CONFIRMED

www.unexceptionalcars.co.uk


Classic Nostalgia

17th-18th July 2021, Shelsley Walsh Hill Climb, Worcester

www.classicnostalgia.co.uk


KMS Motorshow

24th – 25th July, Quex Park, Kent

www.kedamotorshow.com


Carfest North

23rd – 25th July, Bolesworth Estate, Cheshire

www.carfest.org


Silverstone Classic

30th July – 1st August, Silverstone, Northamptonshire

www.silverstoneclassic.com


Carfest South

27th – 29th August, Laverstoke Park Farm, Hampshire

www.carfest.org


Goodwood Revival

17th – 19th September, Goodwood

www.goodwood.com


Concours of Elegance

3rd – 5th September, Hampton Court Palace, London

www.concoursofelegance.co.uk


Salon Privé

1st – 4th September, Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire

www.salonpriveconcours.com


The post The Best car shows to attend in 2021 first appeared on My Car Heaven.


As Aston Martin returns to Formula 1 we look back on previous racing history

Aston Martin will be appearing at Grand Prix for the first time in 60 years. The Aston Martin Formula One Team will make its race debut in Melbourne, Australia, in March. In February, the team will reveal its 2021 F1 car and livery, which includes four-time Formula 1 World Champion, Sebastian Vettel and multiple Grand Prix […] The post As Aston Martin returns to Formula 1 we look back on previous racing history first appeared on My Car...

Aston Martin will be appearing at Grand Prix for the first time in 60 years. The Aston Martin Formula One Team will make its race debut in Melbourne, Australia, in March.

In February, the team will reveal its 2021 F1 car and livery, which includes four-time Formula 1 World Champion, Sebastian Vettel and multiple Grand Prix podium finisher, Lance Stroll.

Otmar Szafnauer, CEO & Team Principal, said: “We’ve had almost a year of preparation to reach this point and we’re really looking forward to seeing the reaction when we finally unveil our new identity as the Aston Martin Formula One Team. Representing such an iconic brand is a huge privilege for every member of the team. We’ve earned a well-deserved reputation for punching above our weight, so we’re confident we can do the Aston Martin name proud right from the get-go. It’s the start of a new journey and I can sense an extra energy in the team, with a determination to push performance further than ever before. Combined with some of the most creative minds in the business, a true racers’ mentality and the can-do spirit that has served us so well through the years, we have every reason to be excited about the future”

It will be an historic and poignant moment when two Aston Martin Formula 1 cars line-up on the grid in Melbourne, returning the luxury marque to Grand Prix racing for the first time in 60 years and starting a new era for a truly great British brand.

Now, as the British luxury brand prepares to return to the F1TM grid for the first time in more than 60 years, it is the ideal moment to look back on the brand’s previous endeavours in the world’s most competitive and challenging motorsport class. 

Chassis TT2 at the 1922 French GP

1920s

From his earliest days at the helm of the fledgling sports car firm, Aston Martin co-founder Lionel Martin dreamt of putting the name of the business he had created with partner Robert Bamford into the headline-grabbing arena of Grand Prix racing. 

The Aston Martin name had been established on the hillclimb courses of Great Britain and Lionel himself had notable success at the wheel of his own car, but he knew competitive Grand Prix racing around Europe would bring the wider fame he craved for his company.

At the start of the ‘Roaring 20s’ that dream moved toward reality when Martin was introduced to a young racing driver, Count Louis Zborowski. This fabulously wealthy son of a Polish Count and an American heiress had an unquenchable thirst for speed, and a strong hankering for motorsport.

With a fortune that in today’s money would comfortably class him as a billionaire, Zborowski had ample resources at his disposal which, allied to his existing knowledge of Aston Martin as a driver of some the brand’s earliest side-valve open wheel racers, gave him the confidence to commission not one but two race cars from the business. 

TT2 (L) Gallop and TT1 (R) Zborowski before French GP,Strasbourg

Working with Lionel Martin and his team they hit on a plan to build two cars to compete in the 1922 Isle of Man TT (Tourist Trophy) event. Zborowski supplied around £10,000 for the project – a small fortune at the time – with the money going toward not only the cars but also the creation of an entirely new 16-valve twin overhead cam four-cylinder race engine. 

The first Aston Martin Grand Prix car, featuring this 1,486cc unit, was good for around 55bhp at 4,200 rpm. The car weighed in at 750kg, had a top speed of 85mph and carried two seats – one off-set, as per the Grand Prix regulations of the time, to accommodate the riding mechanic who was an essential member of the team not least because part of his job was to pressurise the fuel tank via a hand pump. 

Incredibly, by today’s standards at least, the car was driven by road to the race meetings it competed in. 

Irish GP 1930

As ever with Aston Martin, the engine itself has a story behind it. While 16-valve race engines had been successfully developed for a few years by 1922 – Peugeot, Bugatti and A.L.F.A. had all developed large capacity 16-valve units for racing and speed record activities – the genesis of the Aston Martin powerplant is believed to be considerably more colourful. 

Count Zborowski’s close friend and fellow racer, Clive Gallop, had an acquaintance with Peugeot engineer Marcel Gremillion. The talented Frenchman had been a pupil of the great engine designer Ernest Henry, now at Ballot. 

Gremillion persuaded Henry to let him have details of the 3.0-litre Ballot engine. Henry did no more than tear his drawings in half which Gremillion then adapted into the Bamford & Martin single cam, 16-valve, lower-half in return for what was described as a substantial bag of gold coins! 

Thus, with a blueprint torn in two, the Henry-designed 3.0-litre became the Bamford & Martin single cam, 16-valve, 1.5.

Chassis TT1 Grand prix du Bolougne 1st ©AMHT

Grand Prix debut 

While chassis TT1 and TT2 were intended to race in the Tourist Trophy event on 22 June 1922, time was against the team and they could not be made ready. Instead, it was decided to give the cars their first outing at the 2.0-litre French Grand Prix on 15 July at Strasbourg – thereby marking Aston Martin’s debut in Grand Prix competition. 

Zborowski was at the helm of TT1, with Len Martin (no relation) as his mechanic, while Clive Gallop piloted TT2 assisted by mechanic H.J. Bentley (also no relation).

Chassis TT2 Spanish GP ©AMHT

Perhaps unavoidably as a result of a lack of power due to the engine’s smaller-than-race-required capacity, alongside their hurried development and a regulated need to carry ballast, both cars retired with engine problems. But the experience was sufficiently exhilarating for the fledgling team, based at Abingdon Road, Kensington, to continue Grand Prix adventure. 

Having been hastily constructed initially, the TT cars were developed over time and in the months and years that followed they secured several podium finishes including a second place at the 1922 Grand Prix de Penya Rhin, staged on the Villafranca circuit. The team repeated the result at the same event the following year; and took third at the Grand Prix de Boulogne, also in 1923.

The untimely death of Zborowski in 1924, almost inevitably at the wheel of a racing car, signalled the beginning of the end of Aston Martin’s first foray into top flight motorsport and, many successful privateer appearances notwithstanding, it would be another 20 years before the brand made another serious impression in Grand Prix racing. 

1940s

While perhaps technically not a ‘top-flight’ event, the 1946 Belgian Sports Car Grand Prix is worthy of note in the context of Aston Martin’s racing ambitions. 

Early post-war motorsport across Europe was a somewhat organic affair by today’s standards of leading-edge technology and relentless development. Many of the cars competing for honours less than a year after World War Two ended were, unsurprisingly, not entirely new. 

Pre-war Aston Martin ‘Speed Model’ racers were still competitive, and so it was not a shock to see a now-famous 1936 Aston Martin 2.0-litre sports car compete in the 1946 Sports Car Grand Prix Automobile de Belgique, which took place on 16 June at the temporary road course adjacent to the Bois De La Cambre, Brussels. 

Jock Horsfall at the Silverstone GP on 20th August 1949

At the wheel for this event was one of the most colourful characters ever to be associated with the brand: St John Ratcliffe Stewart Horsfall – or ‘Jock’ as he was widely known.

Born to a well-to-do family and one of six boys, Jock took to the automotive world early and acquired his first Aston Martin in 1934, aged just 24. A successful stockbroker, Horsfall quickly became part of the Aston Martin ‘family’ and helped the brand significantly with development and testing. 

During the war he served with MI5 and among his varied duties was the task of driving MI5 officers and agents, double agents, and captured enemy spies from one place to another, very fast. This was all the more remarkable since Horsfall was astigmatic and severely short-sighted, but was averse to wearing glasses to correct his vision.     

He was also involved in testing the security of naval sites and airfields and was privy to a good deal of highly classified information. Certainly, his most famous ‘secret’ activity was his role as a driver in Operation Mincemeat – a successful deception of the Axis powers’ forces to disguise the Allied invasion of Sicily in 1943. 

Interestingly, it is believed that this secret operation was inspired by a memo detailing enemy deception tactics written in 1939 by Rear Admiral John Godfrey, the Director of the Royal Navy’s Intelligence Division, and his personal assistant, one Lieutenant Commander Ian Fleming.  

In the Belgian post-war Sports Car Grand Prix event, Jock’s own vehicle took the chequered flag ahead of a cluster of Frazer Nash, BMW and Alvis competitors. A notable win for a ‘vintage’ machine. 

The race car was powered by a four cylinder 1,950cc overhead cam engine that produced around 125bhp, and weighed around 800kg. With an ‘Ulster Style’ open body, two seats, and separate wings it could hit 120mph.   

But even the victory in Belgium was perhaps not Horsfall’s crowning glory. That came three years later when he took second in class, and fourth overall, in the 1949 Spa 24-hour race as a privateer at the wheel of an Aston Martin Speed Model. What makes this achievement so remarkable is that while he had Paul Frère available as a co-driver, Horsfall chose to drive the car for the entire 24 hours single-handed.

Sadly, Horsfall was killed a little over four weeks later in a racing incident at the 1949 BRDC Trophy race, staged at Silverstone in the UK. His standing within the ranks on Aston Martin owners and enthusiasts can be measured, though, not least by the fact that the Aston Martin Owners’ Club organises an annual race event in his memory: the St. John Horsfall Memorial Trophy.

1950s

The 1950s were an exciting time for Aston Martin. Company owner Sir David Brown, who had acquired the business in 1947 before adding the Lagonda brand later that same year, was steadily creating finely styled British sports cars of growing appeal. 

Sir David recognised the importance of motorsport to the brand’s commercial success and, in 1955, hatched an audacious plan to create cars that would take on the best competition in both the World Sportscar Championship and the still relatively new Formula 1 World Championship.

DBR1 at Le Mans 1959

The history books focus on the famous achievements of the Le Mans-winning DBR1, and the DB3S that preceded it, but the initial venture into single seaters, DP155, could be seen as a valuable learning exercise for the brand, and was the precursor to the later 1950s Grand Prix cars. Alongside this project, Sir David initiated work on a new engine, and a new road car design that would become the DB4. 

So it was, then, that the Aston Martin DBR4 came into being. Tested as early as 1957, it was not until 1959 that the car made its competition debut at the BRDC International Trophy event, run to Formula 1 rules, at Silverstone in May of that year. 

DBR4 1 driven by Salvadori, BRDC International 1959

Two cars competed and car no. 1, driven by 24 Hours of Le Mans winner Roy Salvadori, came in a creditable second behind Jack Brabham in a Cooper-Climax T51. Powered by a 2,493cc, dry sump, six-cylinder RB 250 engine, from the same basic design as the DBR1 sports car engine, the DBR4/250 was a 256bhp spaceframe single seater which weighed in at 575kg. 

Despite being driven by some of the star names of the era, Salvadori and Carroll Shelby among them, the front-engined DBR4 was out of step with the new mid-engined competition and failed to mirror in Formula 1 what it’s DBR1 cousin famously achieved in the sports car arena. After a disappointing debut for its successor, the DBR5, Aston Martin withdrew from top-flight single seater motorsport in 1960. 

DBR5 5 with Salvadori pits at Silverstone GP 1960

2010s

In more recent years, and after a break of nigh on half a century, the Aston Martin wings returned to Formula 1 paddocks around the world as the company became title sponsor and technical partner of Red Bull Racing, a relationship that has also spawned the extraordinary Aston Martin Valkyrie hypercar which is due to enter production in 2021. 

The luxury brand is busy preparing a return to the grid in 2021 with the Aston Martin F1TM Team, which will see Aston Martin compete in a competitive F1TM race for the first time in over 60 years and continue the legacy created by founders Lionel Martin and Robert Bamford.

Lawrence Stroll, executive chairman of Aston Martin, said: “The return of the Aston Martin name to Formula 1TM, set against such a colourful and dynamic history in the sport, is a genuinely exciting time for all of us involved with this great British sports car brand.

“The Formula 1TM grid is the right place for Aston Martin. It’s where this brand should be, and I know this next chapter of our racing history will be incredibly exciting for fans of Aston Martin, and the sport of F1TM, all over the world.”    

The post As Aston Martin returns to Formula 1 we look back on previous racing history first appeared on My Car Heaven.


F1 fans and petrolheads can now drive a Jordan F1 single seater

TrackDays.co.uk is offering race fans the chance to experience a track session in a genuine F1 race car once driven by motor sport legend Takuma Sato in 2002 and which cost £4.5 million to build. The new experience, available from TrackDays.co.uk, allows drivers to get into the cockpit of the F1 car still sporting the […] The post F1 fans and petrolheads can now drive a Jordan F1 single seater first appeared on My Car...

TrackDays.co.uk is offering race fans the chance to experience a track session in a genuine F1 race car once driven by motor sport legend Takuma Sato in 2002 and which cost £4.5 million to build.

The new experience, available from TrackDays.co.uk, allows drivers to get into the cockpit of the F1 car still sporting the original DHL yellow exterior. It is the only EJ12 chassis available to drive.

Dan Jones, operations manager at TrackDays.co.uk, said: “It’s very rare to have the chance to drive a genuine F1 race car that was driven in anger in the world’s foremost motorsport championship. However, it’s not for the fainthearted, as it boasts 600 bhp, an engine that can spin to an astonishing 10,500 rpm courtesy of a 3.0 litre Judd engine, while reaching 60 mph in under five seconds.”

TrackDays.co.uk is currently offering Jordan F1 packages at Bovingdon Airfield in Hertfordshire. The entry level is called the Jordan F1 Driving Experience, while even more intense options include the Jordan F1 Suzuka Legend Experience and the ultimate Jordan F1 Grand Prix Experience, which includes 30 driving laps and many other extras.

Dan added: “Unsurprisingly, our Jordan F1 driving experiences are some of the most premium packages we offer. However, when you consider that it could cost up to £250,000 to own a genuine model, plus the astronomical running costs, then these driving experiences in them are a real bargain while still enjoying a once-in-a-lifetime thrill.”

The post F1 fans and petrolheads can now drive a Jordan F1 single seater first appeared on My Car Heaven.


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