Blogging Fusion » Blog Details for Mountain Bike Trails Southern California

Search Traffic, Engagement, Popularity, Unique Visitors, Audience Geography, Increase Website Traffic




Follow Us


Available Upgrade Detected
If you are the owner of Mountain Bike Trails Southern California, or someone who enjoys this blog why not upgrade it to a Featured Listing or Permanent Listing?.

UPGRADE

SHARE THIS PAGE ON:
Blog Details
Blog Directory ID: 23579 Get VIP Status?
: Report Blog Listing This is a free listing which requires a link back!
Google Pagerank: 1
Blog Description:

Bike This Trail was made by mountain biking enthusiasts for mountain biking enthusiasts. Our website and blog shares great trails and bike tips for mountain bikers.
Blog Added: August 11, 2015 02:35:47 AM
Audience Rating: General Audience
Blog Platform: WordPress
Blog Country: United-States/California   United-States/California
Blog Stats
Total Visits: 1,063
Blog Rating: 2.78
Add the ReviewMe Button Or SEO Rank to your Blog!
Review Mountain Bike Trails Southern California at Blogging Fusion Blog Directory
My Blogging Fusion Score

Featured Resources

Example Ad for Mountain Bike Trails Southern California

This what your Mountain Bike Trails Southern California Blog Ad will look like to visitors! Of course you will want to use keywords and ad targeting to get the most out of your ad campaign! So purchase an ad space today before there all gone!

https://www.bloggingfusion.com
notice: Total Ad Spaces Available: (2) ad spaces remaining of (2)

Advertise in this blog listing?

Blog specific ad placement
Customize the title link
Place a detailed description
It appears here within the content
Approved within 24 hours!
100% Satisfaction
If not completely satisfied, you'll receive 3 months absolutely free;
No questions asked!
Buy Now!
Alexa Web Ranking: 14,423,232

Alexa Ranking - Mountain Bike Trails Southern California
Subscribe to Mountain Bike Trails Southern California
Subscribe Now!
Aliso & Wood Canyon Loop – Laguna Niguel

This ride embodies beauty, toughness, and biking skills, as you traverse Aliso Wilderness, climb up Cholla trail, and descend Rock It. The Coyote Run trail is a blast to ride, and you can even stop by Dripping Caves trail for some cool pics and a piece of history. The post Aliso & Wood Canyon Loop – Laguna Niguel appeared first on Mountain Bike Trails Southern California - Bike This...

Ride Description

This ride embodies beauty, toughness, and biking skills, as you traverse Aliso Wilderness, climb up Cholla trail, and descend Rock It. The Coyote Run trail is a blast to ride, and you can even stop by Dripping Caves trail for some cool pics and a piece of history.

Difficulty

Intermediate

Distance:
Time:
Avg Speed:
Elevation Gain:
Calories:
Avg Temperature:

Driving Directions

5 Frwy & 73 Toll Road, exit La Paz Road and head West
Enter the park on the right and head right just as you enter. Make another right on Shelters 1 & 2 towards the tennis courts. Drive towards the end and park on the right.
Parking fees: $3 per vehicle entry Monday – Friday; $5 Saturday – Sunday

Ride directions

(hover over steps for images – some steps may not have images)

After you gear up, you will need to cross the street to enter the park. There is crosswalk light so you don’t have to play “frogger” with traffic. You will notice the trailhead right across the street as you approach it. Enter here. This part of the ride is incredibly scenic and a great warm up.

1.20- You will reach a paved section. Head right. In a few yards you will reach a paved street, with a single-track running parallel to it. Of course, take the single-track and head left!

2.70- You will enter Aliso Woods Trail on your right. You will ride for approximately 3 miles before you reach Cholla. This section is relatively easy to cruise, but be careful of hikers and joggers. This part of the park is very popular.

4.70- Begin your ascent on Cholla trail. It is a tough climb, but thankfully a short one. The most challenging section is about 50 yards before reaching the top, which consists of a rocky formation. Stay towards your right of this formation (trail leads you there) and you should be able to clear it.

5.08- The climbing is over! Make a left and ride for about ½ mile.

5.69- The Rock It trail-head is on your left. Enter and begin your fun descent. The trail starts wide, but will soon narrow into a single-track. The trail widens when you reach a flowing formation of rock and boulder, which can easily be cleared. It may take a couple of tries to descend it with confidence, but if you descend with control, you will have no issues. Experienced riders and charge it!

6.97- You have one last, fast descent as you leave Rock It and reach Coyote Run trail at the bottom. Head right into this shady section of the loop. There is one short but steep section to clear as you ride Coyote Run, and if you gear down on time, you should be able to clear it.

7.80- Make a left at the creek where Coyote Run ends, and head back to Aliso Woods trail. On Aliso Woods, make a right and retrace your ride back to your car for approximately 3 miles. However, in about .30 miles, you will notice Dripping Caves trail on your right. This section is optional, but a must see. It’s some cool cave formations where apparently the criminals of the 19th century would hide out.

Aliso and Wood Canyon Aliso and Wood Canyon Aliso and Wood Canyon Aliso and Wood Canyon Aliso and Wood Canyon Aliso and Wood Canyon Aliso and Wood Canyon Aliso and Wood Canyon

Garmin Info


The post Aliso & Wood Canyon Loop – Laguna Niguel appeared first on Mountain Bike Trails Southern California - Bike This Trail.



Bane Canyon – Chino Hills

The Northeastern part of Chino Hills State Park is home to some terrific mountain biking. This entrance to the park was closed for over a year while upgrades and improvements were made to the road. What’s nice about it is that it provides a paved road for vehicles to drive in, but a good chunk of the original Bane Canyon dirt road was left intact, which runs parallel to the road. This loop has a nice combination of fun singletrack with most of your climbing in the first mile of the loop....

Ride Description

The Northeastern part of Chino Hills State Park is home to some terrific mountain biking. This entrance to the park was closed for over a year while upgrades and improvements were made to the road. What’s nice about it is that it provides a paved road for vehicles to drive in, but a good chunk of the original Bane Canyon dirt road was left intact, which runs parallel to the road. This loop has a nice combination of fun singletrack with most of your climbing in the first mile of the loop.

You have lots of loop options in this section of the park, which can be tailored from the beginner to advanced rider. This particular loop will take you to the Sidewinder trail, and loop back around to Bane Canyon Rd for a quick ride/workout.

Difficulty

Intermediate

Distance: 6.47 mi
Time: 52:00
Avg Speed: 7.5 mph
Elevation Gain: 764 ft
Calories: 445 C
Avg Temperature: 93.8 °F

Driving Directions

From the 91 freeway, catch the 71 north. Drive approximately 7 miles and exit Soquel Canyon Rd. Make a left and at 1.1 miles turn left on Elinvar. Drive towards the end of the street where it makes and park. Trailhead (Bane Canyon Rd) is on right side.

Parking is free on the street. You also have the option of driving into Bane Canyon Rd to the campgrounds for a small entrance fee.

Trail Directions

(hover over steps for images – some steps may not have images)

Enter Bane Canyon Rd. The ride begins with a steady climb right from the beginning.

.52- Make a right on Bane Canyon Ridge. This trail will take you to the top and continue back down into Bane Canyon Rd. We don’t want to come back down to Bane Canyon Rd so make sure you make a right when you arrive at the intersection at the top.

.98- You have reached the top of Bane Ridge and arrived at an intersection. Bane Ridge trail continues straight and it is clearly marked. You want to head right instead and descend towards a tower. The Sidewinder trail is accessed from down there and it is on the right side of the circle you entered.

Continue on Sidewinder for the next 1-mile. It is by no means technical, but instead a smooth and fast ride through the canyon. This is one of the main highlights of this loop. The trail ends at Upper Alyso Trail.

2.12- Make a left on Upper Alyso and pick up the pace. The trail is even, well-kept and conducive for speed. It will take you into Rolling M Ranch, which is an equestrian staging center. There are facilities available so it is a great place to stop for a rest. If you don’t want to stop, continue on the road, which is paved at this point (it is actually Bane Canyon Rd). As you are making your way towards Lower Alyso trail, you will notice Telegraph and South Ridge Roads on your right side. These two trails will take you to the other side of Chino Hills State Park (Carbon Canyon). Don’t turn in there but continue going up.

3.3- Enter the Lower Alyso single track straight ahead. You will cruise along for about ½ mile until it connects with Lower Alyso rd. Right before you exit this single track though, there are some low hanging branches that will require you to duck low as you ride under. The trail immediately climbs for a very brief moment as you exit the trail so charge on through. Make a left.

3.7- Left on Lower Alyso rd until it ends on Bane Canyon Rd

3.9 – Right on Bane Canyon Rd. It’s paved at this point.

4.2- You will notice the original Bane Canyon dirt rd on your left side. We prefer to ride this but of course, you can also ride the paved road back. There is more climbing and elevation on the pavement so knock yourself out if you wish. The dirt road will eventually end and put you back on the pavement at around the 6-mile mark. Ride back down to your car and watch for oncoming vehicles. It’s all downhill so be mindful of your speed and use caution.

End- 6.47




Garmin Info

The post Bane Canyon – Chino Hills appeared first on Mountain Bike Trails Southern California - Bike This Trail.



Black Star Canyon – Silverado Canyon Bike Trail

You can look forward to 8 miles of climbing to the top of Black Star, but coming back down is the fun part.  The scenery is great as this ride is deep in the Santa Ana Mountains.  There is a lot of history in this canyon, which adds to the allure of this ride.  Some claim that this area is haunted. However, we have yet to encounter anything out of the ordinary.  Just a great ride! The post Black Star Canyon – Silverado Canyon Bike Trail appeared first on Mountain Bike Trails Southern...

Ride Description

You can look forward to 8 miles of climbing to the top of Black Star, but coming back down is the fun part.  The scenery is great as this ride is deep in the Santa Ana Mountains.  There is a lot of history in this canyon, which adds to the allure of this ride.  Some claim that this area is haunted. However, we have yet to encounter anything out of the ordinary.  Just a great ride!

Difficulty

Intermediate-Advanced

Distance16.65 mi
Time: 2:05:33
Avg Speed: 8.0 mph
Elevation Gain: 2,480 ft
Calories: 1,366 C
Avg Temperature: 68.1 °F

Driving Directions

– Exit Chapman off 55 frwy and head 5.2 miles
– Chapman becomes Santiago Canyon Road, stay straight
– Black Star Canyon Road, turn left at 10.5 miles
– Drive to end of the road

and/or

– Exit Santiago Canyon Road off 241/261 toll roads and head 5.2 miles
– Black Star, turn left at 5.2 miles
– Drive to end of the road

Trail Directions

(hover over steps for images – some steps may not have images)

Start at trail head and cross gate.  This section of the ride is paved.

Trail heads left and begins ascending.  On the right is a small trail that leads down to the creek, which leads to Blackstar Canyon Waterfalls.  That is another ride/hike though.

At approximately five miles, you will ride along Hidden Valley.  Keep climbing

You’ve reached Beek’s Point (cabin ruins). Keep climbing towards Doppler.

Top of Doppler. Turn back and head back down for 8 miles of descending.

Garmin Info


The post Black Star Canyon – Silverado Canyon Bike Trail appeared first on Mountain Bike Trails Southern California - Bike This Trail.



Bonelli Park – San Dimas

Bonelli park in San Dimas is a multi recreational park that offers camping, boating, hiking, golfing, and of course, mountain biking. It is adjacent to Raging Waters, and it is quickly accessible from any county. There are approximately 9 miles of trail network in our featured loop, most of which circles around the lake and the park. The post Bonelli Park – San Dimas appeared first on Mountain Bike Trails Southern California - Bike This...

Ride Description

Bonelli park in San Dimas is a multi recreational park that offers camping, boating, hiking, golfing, and of course, mountain biking. It is adjacent to Raging Waters, and it is quickly accessible from any county. There are approximately 9 miles of trail network in our featured loop, most of which circles around the lake and the park. There are also plenty of trails to ride within the center of the park itself if our loop keeps you wanting for more. Be advised that this ride is all sun exposure, and there is plenty of climbing to keep your legs pumping. San Dimas can be a scorcher in the summer so get there early and bring plenty of hydration to avoid heat related injury. There are trail maps available on their website, with trail names, but you will notice signs that only state “Bonelli Park”. Follow these and you’ll be fine. The general idea is to loop around the park in a clockwise motion.

Winter hours: October-February, Sunrise to 7pm
Summer Hours: March-September, Sunrise to 9pm
(no entry charge on non-holiday weekdays Nov. – Feb.)

Difficulty

Beginner-Intermediate

Distance: 9.01 mi
Time: 1:45:02
Avg Speed: 5.1 mph
Elevation Gain: 1,598 ft
Calories: 738 C
Avg Temperature: 82.2 °F

Driving Directions

From the 57 Freeway exit Via Verde and turn left into park

From the the 10 & 210 freeways connect to the 57 freeway and exit Via Verde

Trail Directions

(hover over steps for images – some steps may not have images)

As you drive into the park, head towards the parking area on the left. The trail begins behind the parking section across the street. Enter and go straight.

.34. Go through tunnel and up on single-track.

1.14 left at fork after descent from one mile mark. Begin climbing. 1.96. Right at fork and descend. If you go straight up, it will eventually dead end. Great for extra effort!

2.19 right at fork. Remember clockwise?

2.29 left and up towards gate. Go right.

2.50 Cross street and head left. Enter trail and switch left after a few yards.

2.84 left by dam. Climb.

3.0 left on paved street and enter trail on right.

3.1 switch left when trail forks.

3.40. You will see Bonelli park signage. Enter single-track. Easy flat riding.

4.34 right where trail ends. Follow Bonelli Park sign marker.

4.56 head left towards creek and cross. Nothing technical here.

5.33 when you are by the airport, head straight and make right just below a mountain with a short but steep climb. If you decide to climb it, it dead ends.

5.5 left and climb fire road

6. Keep climbing. You will pass Corkscrew trail on right.

6.30 descend and go through the tunnel.

6.50 from here, descend and go left through valley. Ride the fire road, which has plenty of climbing, and finally descend back to the parking area.


Garmin Info


The post Bonelli Park – San Dimas appeared first on Mountain Bike Trails Southern California - Bike This Trail.



Caspers Wilderness – Santa Ana Mountains

Casper's wilderness park sits on over 8000 acres of beautiful terrain within the Santa Ana mountains. The park can be accessed from the main entrance off Ortega highway or from Dove Ave in Coto De casa. You can get right into bell canyon and make your way up the east ridge for a quicker ride and loop, or you can do longer, more grueling loop starting in Coto. The first few miles are generally down hill with plenty of short, steep climbs. Head down on star rise trail until you reach bell...

Ride Description

Casper’s wilderness park sits on over 8000 acres of beautiful terrain within the Santa Ana mountains. The park can be accessed from the main entrance off Ortega highway or from Dove Ave in Coto De casa. You can get right into bell canyon and make your way up the east ridge for a quicker ride and loop, or you can do longer, more grueling loop starting in Coto. The first few miles are generally down hill with plenty of short, steep climbs. Head down on star rise trail until you reach bell canyon. There is a tough steep climb going up towards east ridge but the ride down is worth it. Cruise along the campground for about a mile and get back on dirt. The second half of this loop is ascending about 7.5 miles all the way back to your car. Its a long jaunt so bring drink, food and proper gear (tools).

Difficulty

Intermediate/Advance

Distance: 21.81 mi
Time: 3:31:23
Avg Speed: 6.2 mph
Elevation Gain: 2,448 ft
Calories: 1,678 C
Avg Temperature: 92.0 °F

Driving Directions

From 5 freeway exit Alicia parkway and head east for a little over 5 miles. Right on Santa Margarita parkway for 2 1/2 miles and right on Plano trabuco road. Make a left on Dove Canyon drive immediately park on the street on your right. Head towards the corner of dove canyon drive and enter. You will climb a paved road and enter trail on your right.

Trail Directions

Enter Bell View trail. The first few miles consist of a gradual descent but it comes with plenty of short steep climbs.

5.06. Enter west ridge trail and continue.

6.5. Left on star rise trail. There is no other way to go so its difficult to miss.

7.5. Trail ends at t junction which is Oso trail. There is a bench in the area if you need to take a breather before the next phase of the loop begins. Make a left on Oso.

8.2. Right on Oso trail.

9.0. Right on Cougar pass.

9.2. Left on East ridge trail. You will encounter some steep climbing here. Tough it out and soon you will be descending the ridge.

12. Trail ends at campground. Head right on the pavement for a little under a mile.

12.7. Back on Bell canyon and ride back to Star rise.

14. Left on star rise and begin climbing back up to west ridge trail.

15. Take west ridge all the way back to your vehicle. Enjoy the climb back!

21.5. End

Garmin Info



The post Caspers Wilderness – Santa Ana Mountains appeared first on Mountain Bike Trails Southern California - Bike This Trail.



Crystal Cove I- Newport Coast

Those of us that live in Southern Cal are fortunate to have a wide variety of options to choose from when it comes to determining where to ride. On those blazing, hot days though, nothing beats a trip to the coast where the temperatures tend to be a bit lower. Crystal Cove State Park, located in the Newport Coast area, is one of those places. Crystal Cove is home to several classic rides such as Moro Canyon, Moro Ridge, Fence-line, Rattlesnake, and Emerald Canyon, just to name a few. This...

Trail Description

Those of us that live in Southern Cal are fortunate to have a wide variety of options to choose from when it comes to determining where to ride. On those blazing, hot days though, nothing beats a trip to the coast where the temperatures tend to be a bit lower. Crystal Cove State Park, located in the Newport Coast area, is one of those places. Crystal Cove is home to several classic rides such as Moro Canyon, Moro Ridge, Fence-line, Rattlesnake, and Emerald Canyon, just to name a few. This park can be accessed directly from PCH but we prefer to begin this loop from Ridge Park. Parking is free.

Difficulty

Intermediate

Distance: 10.33 mi
Time: 1:20:10
Avg Speed: 7.7 mph
Elevation Gain: 1,385 ft
Calories: 781 C
Avg Temperature: 63.5 °F

Driving Directions

From the 55 freeway, catch the 73 south and exit Macarthur blvd. Stay on it for 2.4 miles. Make a left on San Joaquin Hills Rd and drive 2.6 miles until you get to Newport Coast Dr. Make a right and about a block down the street, make a left on Park Ridge. Go up about 1.5 miles and park. The trailhead is straight ahead.

Parking Info- I enter from Park Ridge where it’s free to park. If you enter from main gate at PCH, parking is like $10.

Trail Directions

(hover over steps for images – some steps may not have images)

The trailhead begins at the end of Park Ridge. You will notice the Bommer trail ahead of you as it drops immediately. You will begin a short climb afterwards to the top of the hill. From there, it’s another descent to our destination, Moro Canyon Rd.

.92 miles- You will encounter a fork at approximately .92 miles where you will see a trail post. Although this is Moro Canyon Rd, it won’t specify it. Instead, it will let you know that Bommer continues straight ahead and Crystal Cove S.P. is to your right. GO RIGHT.

1.03 miles- you will pass a wood fence. A few yards after, make a right and begin your descent into Moro Canyon.

2.32 miles- make a right here. You will be coming into this turn pretty quick so make sure you go right, not straight. This section is probably the shadiest part of the trail, as most of it is exposed to the sun. Enjoy it while it lasts because it’s not very long!

3.78 miles- This is a 3 way cross-section and you are to continue straight on Moro Canyon. Up ahead to your left is “I think I Can” trail, which is a climb up to Moro Ridge. We will be doing the same, but not at this junction. Keep cranking and enjoy the easy ride through the Canyon.

4.83 miles- What comes down must go up right? At this point, you will notice a trail post and a singletrack on your left side. This is B.F.I. trail. Although the trail post does not indicate this is B.F.I., the map on the trail post will confirm that for you. Make a left here and start climbing. You will be afforded incredible views of the coast as you are making your way up B.F.I. The top section of this trail is extremely steep but thankfully, short lived.

5.16 miles- You will hit a gravel section at this point. Make a left and continue climbing. It’s not going to get any easier as the road goes up, and up, and up…. Expect to continue climbing for the next 3 plus miles. There will be some areas of reprieve and great scenery so make sure to soak it all in. You will also see several trails that shoot in from the right and left side but continue going straight on the road.

7.14 miles- At this fork, you will see the “Lower Moro Campground” sign towards the right. Stay on the right and continue your way for approximately 1 ½ miles to “Missing Link” trail.

8.54 miles- At this part of the trail, you will see an unmarked singletrack on your left. Don’t pass it up. This will take you to Missing link trail, one of the highlights of this ride.

8.65 miles- Missing link trail is straight ahead and immediately drops. There are some rocky sections on this trail, but nothing too complex. Both beginning to advanced riders can determine how gnarly you want this ride to be by adjusting your speed. Have fun as you make your way down this trail.

9.16 miles- continue along the fence on your right and keep going straight.

9.26 miles- Stay on singletrack as it veers towards the right. This is Fenceline trail. Cruise this trail for the next .40 miles.

9.66- On your right, you will notice a gate. Go right here and go through the gate back to Bommer.

Make a left on Bommer and make your way back up to the Park.



Garmin Info


The post Crystal Cove I- Newport Coast appeared first on Mountain Bike Trails Southern California - Bike This Trail.



Subscribe to RSS Feed
Other Related Blogs

Link to Category: Outdoor Blogs


Or if you prefer use one of our linkware images? Click here