Blogging Fusion Blog Directory the #1 blog directory and oldest directory online.

iBankruptcy Attorneys

Home iBankruptcy Attorneys

iBankruptcy Attorneys

Rated: 3.17 / 5 | 2,954 listing views iBankruptcy Attorneys Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

United-States

 

General Audience

  • 1-213-699-3055
  • Scott Reilly
  • December 27, 2017 11:51:31 PM
SHARE THIS PAGE ON:

A Little About Us

Bankruptcy or insolvency occurs when an individual or business is unable to repay necessary debts owed to creditors. Generally imposed as a court order, bankruptcy is often the result of financial distress on the part of a debtor. Nobody wants to file for bankruptcy. It is a giant decision that requires the skilled council of an experienced attorney who specializes in bankruptcy litigation. The experienced Los Angeles Bankruptcy Attorneys at the Law Offices of I Los Angeles Bankruptcy Attorneys will support you through the process of bankruptcy and will guide you back to the brink of financial stability. For a free consultation with one of our bilingual staff members, please call us today at (213) 699-3055.

Listing Details

  • Related URL:
  • Los Angeles Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Attorney
  • Whether you are an individual or a small business facing the possibility of Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you need an attorney who is skilled in dealing with bankruptcy law to represent you in court. The Los Angeles chapter 7 bankruptcy lawyers at the Law Offices of I Los Angeles Bankruptcy Attorneys are here to support you through the process of filing for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy. We have a proven track record of success in helping our clients obtain debt relief and financial stability. If you are a small business or an individual struggling through financial hardships, call our attorneys at the Law Offices of I Los Angeles Bankruptcy Attorneys today at (213) 699-3055 to schedule a free consultation and to put yourself on the path once again to financial freedom.
  • Related URL:
  • Los Angeles Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Attorney
  • Chapter 13 bankruptcy is described as a debt relief process whereby you maintain ownership of your property while paying back all or a significant portion of your owed debts over a period of time, generally between 3 to 5 years. Unlike Chapter 11 bankruptcy, where your debts are absolved but there is often inevitable surrender of property and assets, Chapter 13 bankruptcy is a debt relief option that allows the person experiencing financial troubles to repay their debts while keeping their property intact. Also referred to as “Reorganization Bankruptcy,” Chapter 13 bankruptcy is an excellent possibility to establish financial stability if deemed an eligible candidate.
  • Related URL:
  • Chapter 11 Business Bankruptcy Attorney Los Angeles
  • With the economic recession of 2008, small businesses suffered perhaps more than any other sector of the American economy. They are our florists, our coffee shop owners, our boutique hotel owners, clothing store proprietors and construction companies. They are the men and women who make up the fabric of American commerce and they deserve the utmost respect for their contribution to society. There is no shame in financial struggle, and the attorneys at the Los Angeles Law Offices of I Los Angeles Bankruptcy Attorneys are committed to supporting the small businesses of Southern California to right themselves in times of extreme financial distress. For a free consultation with one of our bilingual staff members at either our Los Angeles or Sherman Oaks offices, please call (213) 699-3055 today.
  • Related URL:
  • Debt Settlement Attorney Los Angeles
  • Debt settlement is also referred to as debt arbitration, debt negotiation or credit settlement. When you find yourself struggling with excessive debt in your life it can feel like you are drowning without a life raft. Debt can tear families apart and can negatively impact the health, happiness and well being of those dealing with its challenges. With excessive debt you may qualify for Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy, but that extreme measure may not be necessary. Our skilled attorneys at the Los Angeles Law Offices of I Los Angeles Bankruptcy Attorneys will guide you through the process of exploring other alternatives to bankruptcy, such as arranging a debt settlement with your lender or creditor. Such arrangements are complicated and require the expertise of an attorney who understands the ins and outs of debt settlement. Do not enter into this variety of arrangement without first consulting with an attorney.
  • Related URL:
  • Foreclosure Attorney Los Angeles
  • You worked hard to provide a home for yourself and for your family and the possibility that you might lose it because of financial distress is a sobering and heartbreaking reality. As mortgage payments stack higher and higher without a solution in sight, the possible loss of your home may be looming on the horizon. It is not uncommon for homeowners to feel completely hopeless about their situation when it appears that the deck is stacked against them and there appear to be no viable debt relief solutions. Such situations can affect all members of your family and can upset the balance of your day to day living and experience of overall well being.
  • Premium Bronze Membership: Never Expires   
  • Listing Statistics

    (1) Reviews for iBankruptcy Attorneys

    Los Angeles Bankruptcy Attorney

    Los Angeles Bankruptcy Attorney 5.00 iBankruptcy Attorneys

    2017-12-27 16:17:52

    Best Attorneys in Los Angeles for Saving Your Home.

    Add ReviewMe Button

    Review iBankruptcy Attorneys at Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

    Add SEO Score Button

    My Blogging Fusion Score

    Google Adsense™ Share Program

    Alexa Web Ranking: N/A

    Alexa Ranking - iBankruptcy Attorneys

    Subscribe to iBankruptcy Attorneys

    Are Your Wages Being Garnished?

    Are your wages being garnished for child support, student loans, or back taxes and you're now unable to pay any of your other creditors? We can help you figure out a solution for how to move forward when your wages are being garnished. Wage Garnishment Garnishment is recognized as an American legal order for The post Are Your Wages Being Garnished? appeared first on Resnik Hayes Moradi...

    Are your wages being garnished for child support, student loans, or back taxes and you’re now unable to pay any of your other creditors? We can help you figure out a solution for how to move forward when your wages are being garnished.

    Wage Garnishment

    Garnishment is recognized as an American legal order for collecting monetary judgment on behalf of a plaintiff from a defendant. Moneys can come directly from a garnishee or defendant or in certain specific cases, from a third involved party. Wage garnishment is the most common form of garnishment and consists of allocating money from an employee’s salary to offset certain debts. Garnishment of wages continues until a debt is paid off in its entirety or specific arrangements have been secured that will ensure the repayment of said debts.

    Understanding Wage Garnishment

    The most commonly recognized forms of debt where wage garnishment can be employed are child support, spousal support (alimony), unpaid taxes, unpaid court fines and defaulted student loans. Payroll departments at a garnishee’s place of employment are responsible for setting up the appropriate garnishments, however in some cases there is not sufficient funding to satisfy federal, state and local taxes, therefor, federal taxes are garnished first. Employers are required to accurately calculate wage garnishments for employees until all debts are sufficiently reimbursed.

    As an employee or an individual, avoiding wage garnishment is preferred since it can negatively impact ones credit, reputation and future ability to qualify for loans or banking privileges. Depending on the jurisdiction of an individual, certain restrictions may apply in regards to wage garnishment, therefor, having the skilled counsel of an attorney who understands California specific laws in regards to wage garnishment law will be to your benefit.

    Dealing with Creditors and Bill Collectors

    Creditors and Bill collectors will ruthlessly pursue payment for owed debts and when you are unable to reimburse them they may turn to filing a lawsuit in an effort to obtain a court order that would allow them the ability to legally garnish partial wages. Their ability to garnish funds from your paycheck can cause even further financial distress and may result in more financial troubles. If you are struggling with the effects of wage garnishment by a creditor or bill collector, contact our skilled attorneys at the Los Angeles Law Offices of I Los Angeles Bankruptcy Attorneys today for a free consultation. We will support you in finding the best course of action to stop wage garnishment and to consider filing for either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. There is a solution, and we are committed to supporting you through this process. Filing for bankruptcy allows the courts to issue an “Automatic Stay,” which stops creditors and bill collectors from harassing you with incessant calls and the ability to withdraw money from your bank accounts through wage garnishment.

    What Can Bankruptcy Do to Help

    If you do not meet the undue hardship criteria for student loan debt, bankruptcy can still help you in important ways. Mostly, you will be filing in order to control your other forms of debt. Filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy can restructure your student loans along with other debt into a manageable three- to five-year payment plan.

    Filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy can eliminate your other debts such as credit card and medical bills, giving you some breathing room, so you can better manage your student loan debt.

    Every situation is different. Our bankruptcy lawyers will work with you personally to craft a debt relief strategy that meets your unique goals and helps you get your student loan debt under control.

    Chapter 13 and Chapter 7

    There are two main types of consumer bankruptcy protection: Chapter 13 and Chapter 7.

    Chapter 13

    Chapter 13 bankruptcy is designed to allow you to keep all of your property, but is also determined by your property. The amount of your nonexempt property affects how much unsecured creditors get paid during your bankruptcy process. And to avoid foreclosure or repossession, you still need to keep up with the payments you make for you secured debt, such as mortgages or car loans.

    Chapter 7

    When you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, almost all of your assets and property are liquidated and thus become property of the bankruptcy estate that is sold to allow you to repay your debts. There are some exceptions to this though.

    During your Chapter 7 bankruptcy, a bankruptcy trustee is appointed and given the authority to sell your assets so that you are able to pay your creditors.  Just because your assets are being sold, that does not mean that all of your property needs to be sold.

    Differences in Chapter 7 and 13 Bankruptcy

    In Chapter 13 bankruptcy, a trustee will not sell your nonexempt assets and distribute the proceeds to your creditors. That’s how it works in Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Rather, you will need to put together a repayment plan that shows your creditors how you plan to pay back some or all of your creditors. You get to keep your property in exchange for paying back a certain amount of the debt you owe. But remember that the more nonexempt assets you have, the more you will need to pay to unsecured creditors.

    When you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, a trustee takes the nonexempt property, sells it, and uses the proceeds to pay your general unsecured creditors. But because you keep all of your property with Chapter 13, it’s unfair to your unsecured creditors if they do not get paid as much as they would have had you filed for Chapter 7.

    Because of this, if you file Chapter 13 and create a repayment plan, you will still need to pay the general unsecured creditors a dividend at least equal to the value of your nonexempt assets. So if you have a large amount of nonexempt property, you have to repay the unsecured debts in full.

    Working with a Bankruptcy Attorney

    When you decide to file bankruptcy, you should also consider working with an attorney. They will advise you on the following:

    • the type of bankruptcy you should file
    • how bankruptcy can help you
    • what to expect during the process, and
    • any potential difficulties they see with your case

    Additionally, they should be able to address any questions or concerns you might have.

    The Bankruptcy Process

    Filing for bankruptcy requires you to fill out a packet of forms. Your bankruptcy attorney will have specialized software that helps to guide you through the process and also ensures that everything is prepared for the court. You will be required to provide information about your income, expenses, assets, and debts. Working with an attorney will ensure that the information on these forms is filled out accurately, and filed correctly.

    Bankruptcy Hearings

    You will need to attend a meeting of creditors after you file for bankruptcy. Depending on your specific filing, you might need to attend additional hearings. Your lawyer will advise you on if you need to be in attendance, or if they are able to represent you without you needing to be there, as sometimes you will not be required to be in attendance.

    At all times your lawyer will help you to understand the process, as well as ensure that the court has all the information it needs to obtain from you, in addition to any forms.

    Working with Resnik Hayes Moradi LLP

    Are you overwhelmed by your wages being garnished and looking for financial relief? While in most cases, student loans cannot be discharged in bankruptcy, the attorneys at, can help you explore debt relief options that can make your situation much easier to bear. We are experienced bankruptcy lawyers who have helped numerous clients throughout the Los Angeles area achieve their debt relief goals. Call 213.699.3055 or contact us online for a free consultation with a California bankruptcy lawyer. It could be your first step on the road to debt relief.

    Resnik Hayes Moradi LLP

    510 W. Sixth Street Suite 1220

    Los Angeles, CA 90014

    Phone: (213) 699-3055

    https://ibankruptcyattorneys.com

    The post Are Your Wages Being Garnished? appeared first on Resnik Hayes Moradi LLP.


    When Student Loan Debt Leads to Bankruptcy

    It can be very difficult, if not impossible, to discharge student loans through bankruptcy. Courts require that you prove it would cause an undue hardship for you to pay. The problem with this is that Congress has never defined what constitutes an "undue hardship," thus leaving it in the hands of many courts to determine The post When Student Loan Debt Leads to Bankruptcy appeared first on Resnik Hayes Moradi...

    It can be very difficult, if not impossible, to discharge student loans through bankruptcy. Courts require that you prove it would cause an undue hardship for you to pay. The problem with this is that Congress has never defined what constitutes an “undue hardship,” thus leaving it in the hands of many courts to determine if debtors should or should not have to repay their student loans. The problem is, for many, the existence of student loan debt makes it hard to pay for any other form of credit.

    No Definition for Undue Hardship

    According to a 2017 report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, there are around 44 million borrowers with student debt. That outstanding student debt sits at about $1.4 trillion. With these staggering numbers, it’s unreal that we have not decided on a way to deal with student loan debt as a nation.

    According to the National Consumer Law Center, the Brunner test is currently being used to define undue hardship. It’s based on three factors that borrowers must prove:

    1. Would you be able to maintain a minimal standard of living if you had to repay the loan?
    2. Are the financial difficulties you face temporary, or are they expected to continue for several years?
    3. Have you made efforts to keep up with your student loan payments before filing for bankruptcy?

    A borrower must prove paying back debt will prove an undue hardship and will continue to prove an undue hardship.
    That rule may be changing though.
    The Department of Education is currently re-evaluating these criteria and developing guidance on determining when a borrower is experiencing undue hardship. It’s also looking at whether to change how each factor implements the decision as well as how to make student loan discharges more accessible for borrowers who need relief.
    Time will tell what happens with the decision regarding student loan debt. In the mean time, if you are suffering under overwhelming amounts of debt, there are options for you including debt consolidation of your other debt, and also bankruptcy.

    Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act

    In 2005 the bank lobby enacted the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act. This act essentially sealed the fate on private student loan debt – making it almost completely (except for extreme cases) nondischargeable in bankruptcy. Prior to 2005, only federal student loans were difficult to get discharged.

    That change quickly meant a lifetime of indentured servitude to student loan debt payments for American families who had taken out loans to ensure the well-being of their college-bound children. Once one of those children graduated from college they were soon met with a struggling job market that could offer very little in terms of employment. Thus, the interest on the loan piles up. In extreme cases, this leads to default. But what’s most frustrating in all of this is the fact that this debt is not dischargeable in bankruptcy, and worse, it is hardly ever forgiven.

    No “Re-Start” for Those with Student Loans

    Even mortgage debt is dischargeable in bankruptcy and through foreclosure. While not ideal, families are able to re-start. But with student loans, there’s no sense of a “re-start.” This form of debt cannot be discharged, and even worse, banks and debt collectors can get a lien on not only the student’s home, but also the parent’s home (if they co-signed for the loan) and garnish wages and garnish bank accounts.

    Privately Held Student Loans

    Private lenders — banks, credit unions, and other financial firms that provide student education loans — often take a lot of flack for being unwilling to negotiate with borrowers struggling with repayment. Borrowers are often at the mercy of these private lenders who hold 8 percent of the $1.18 trillion student loan market due to the fact that, according to lenders, student loans are packaged into securities and then sold to investors, thus creating restrictions on the contracts. These restrictions make it hard for lenders to adjust the terms of the repayment for borrowers.

    When Are Student Loans Dischargeable?

    Student loans are only dischargeable in bankruptcy if you can prove to a judge that you have an “undue hardship” that makes it impossible for you to pay your debt. Examples of an undue hardship include a disability that is severe enough that it prevents you from working.

    Statistics to be Aware Of

    A lot of people that have student loan debt who file bankruptcy do not ask for their loans to be forgiven because they have heard it is impossible. Here are some statistics you must know:

    • According to a Harvard law school study, 99.9% of bankruptcy filers that have educational debt don’t ask for forgiveness.
    • 40% of debtors who do request for relief from student loans in bankruptcy are granted partial or total discharge of the student loans.
    • Every year 70,000 debtors that file bankruptcy actually qualify to discharge some or all of their student loan debt.

    You Have to Qualify

    To be eligible for student loan debts to be discharged, you must first qualify. You will need to follow a set procedure, outlined below, to discharge your debt.

    Procedure to Discharge your Student Loans in Bankruptcy:

    You must first file a formal complaint called a Complaint to Determine Dischargeability with the bankruptcy court. You will then need to prove to the court that payment of your loans will cause an undue hardship.Most likely a test will be used to determine undue hardship. This test varies between courts, but usually the Brunner test is used. Here are three circumstances you must meet to qualify for the Brunner test:

    Poverty. Based upon your current income and expenses, you will be unable to maintain a minimal standard of living for yourself and your dependents if you are forced to repay your loans.
    Persistence. Your current financial situation is likely to continue for a significant part of the repayment period.
    Good faith. You have made a good faith effort to repay your student loans.
    The Totality of the Circumstances test examines all relevant factors in your case.
    There is also special test for Health Education Assistance Loans (HEAL). You will have to show that the loan became due more than seven years ago and repayment would cause an “unconscionable” burden on your life.

    Most courts look at the undue hardship tests as all or nothing – either you qualify to get the whole loan discharged, or you do not. But some courts have discharged a portion of a debtor’s student loan.

    Three Common Characteristics

    According to a Harvard study, debtors who were successful in discharging some or all of their student loans through bankruptcy had at least one of these common characteristics: they were unemployed, had a medical hardship, or had a lower income the year before filing for bankruptcy.

    You Must File for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

    If you are filing for bankruptcy to try and discharge student loan debt you must file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Chapter 7 bankruptcy allows immediate forgiveness of all unsecured debts. This is different from Chapter 13 bankruptcy, which establishes a debt repayment plan that allows you to discharge your debts over a period of three years.

    Managing Other Debt

    One other thing that might help student loan debt is to find a way to manage your other debt through debt consolidation. Streamlining debts can help to free yourself from financial burden while lowering costs. But you’ll want to understand just what debt consolidation is so that you can decide if it’s for you. If you’re able to pay off your debts within 6 months to a year, you might just consider being really strict. If you look at your debt and see years and years of potentially impossible saving, then you might consider debt consolidation.

    Debt Consolidation Companies

    A lot of times willpower is not enough to help debtors out of the hole. It’s important that you analyze your spending habits. Going out to dinner every night for a delicious but extravagant meal will not help you pay down your $33,000 Visa debt. You’re going to need to make some changes. But if you have made those changes and you still are not reaping the rewards of your new debt habits, then you might want to seek the help of an expert.

    That’s exactly where a debt consolidation company comes in. These companies are kind of like your best friend that stops you from eating that fourth chocolate chip cookie. Debt consolidation companies are there to “save you from yourself” and help you make the right financial moves before your “inner cookie monster” takes over.

    Here’s what a debt consolidation (a.k.a. debt management or credit counseling) does:

    • Closes credit accounts so you cannot use them.
    • Sets up an automated monthly payment based on your budget that gets distributed it to your creditors.
    • In some cases, they can negotiate lower APRs or reduced late fees with your creditors

    Considering Debt Consolidation

    Debt consolidation can be helpful to anyone: whether you’re considering bankruptcy, or if you are just trying to get a handle on your finances.

    What Is Debt Consolidation?

    Debt consolidation means that all of your smaller loans get paid off with one large loan. So you essentially get one lump sum to pay off your smaller loans so that you only have one monthly payment rather than several monthly payments. The theory behind this is one payment is easier to manage than several. And the main goal is to lower the interest rate and monthly payments while paying off your debt in a quicker amount of time.

    Debt Settlement

    It’s important to note that debt consolidation is not the same as debt settlement. Debt consolidation allows you to pay your debts in full without causing negative consequences to your credit. Debt settlement is the process of paying off debt to a creditor once a mutually agreed to sum is reached. This sum is usually less than what is owed. Typically, only unsecured debt (for example, credit cards and medical bills), is eligible for debt settlement. Debt settlement is often considered a risky process.

    How Bankruptcy Can Help

    If you do not meet the undue hardship criteria for student loan debt, bankruptcy can still help you in important ways. Mostly, you will be filing in order to control your other forms of debt. Filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy can restructure your student loans along with other debt into a manageable three- to five-year payment plan.

    Filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy can eliminate your other debts such as credit card and medical bills, giving you some breathing room, so you can better manage your student loan debt.
    Every situation is different. Our bankruptcy lawyers will work with you personally to craft a debt relief strategy that meets your unique goals and helps you get your student loan debt under control.

    Working with Resnik Hayes Moradi LLP

    Are you overwhelmed by student loan debt and looking for financial relief? While in most cases, student loans cannot be discharged in bankruptcy, the attorneys at, can help you explore debt relief options that can make your situation much easier to bear. We are experienced bankruptcy lawyers who have helped numerous clients throughout the Los Angeles area achieve their debt relief goals. Call 213.699.3055 or contact us online for a free consultation with a California bankruptcy lawyer. It could be your first step on the road to debt relief.

    Resnik Hayes Moradi LLP
    510 W. Sixth Street Suite 1220
    Los Angeles, CA 90014
    Phone: (213) 699-3055
    https://ibankruptcyattorneys.com

    The post When Student Loan Debt Leads to Bankruptcy appeared first on Resnik Hayes Moradi LLP.


    U.S. Retirement Crisis

    More seniors are filing for bankruptcy, leaving many to question if America is facing a “retirement crisis."U.S. Retirement CrisisAccording to a paper by academic researchers affiliated with the Consumer Bankruptcy Project, "Older Americans are increasingly likely to file consumer bankruptcy and their representation among those in bankruptcy has never been higher.”So what's the potential reason? High The post U.S. Retirement Crisis appeared first on Resnik Hayes Moradi...

    More seniors are filing for bankruptcy, leaving many to question if America is facing a “retirement crisis.”

    U.S. Retirement Crisis

    According to a paper by academic researchers affiliated with the Consumer Bankruptcy Project, “Older Americans are increasingly likely to file consumer bankruptcy and their representation among those in bankruptcy has never been higher.”

    So what’s the potential reason? High health care costs and insufficient income are major factors. These issues stem mostly from a decreasing social safety net and changes in retirement plans.

    Comparing data from the Consumer Bankruptcy Project between 1991 and the newly released numbers, researchers found more than a two-fold increase in the rate at which Americans aged 65 or more years filed for bankruptcy and an almost five-fold increase in the percentage of older Americans in the U.S. bankruptcy system.

    “The magnitude of growth in older Americans in bankruptcy is so large that the broader trend of an aging U.S. population can explain only a small portion of the effect,” they wrote.

    According to the publishers of the paper, the trend will continue unless there are “significant policy changes that reassume the risks of aging and effectively [e]nsure the financial stability of older Americans.”

    Understanding Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

    If you are falling behind on making payments for medical expenses and are looking for protection from lurking creditors and mounting debt, chances are you’ve considered bankruptcy. There are different kinds of bankruptcy, including: Chapter 7 bankruptcy, Chapter 13 bankruptcy, and Chapter 11. Here’s some information about how they differ from each other.

    Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

    Chapter 7 bankruptcy essentially allows you to wipe your financial slate clean without the worry of making “past due” amounts.  Certain property is sold and then used to repay debts. If there is no property that can be resold, many of the debts will be discharged, or cancelled, once the bankruptcy case concludes.

    Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

    Chapter 13 bankruptcy allows you to reorganize your debt. You work with a bankruptcy attorney to set forth a plan to repay as much as your debt as possible during a 3-5 year period. You’ll be required by a bankruptcy court to provide detailed financial statements that support your proclaimed revenue and expenses. Once the plan is created you’ll have to make monthly payments to a trustee, who in turn pays off your creditors. Once you have completed the repayment plan, you are no longer responsible for any previous debts, even if through repayment, you were not required to pay the entire amount that was owed. Chapter 13 also stops increases on interest rates, such as the interest rate owed on a credit card.

    Chapter 11 Bankruptcy

    While Chapter 11 is typically filed by businesses and corporations, Chapter 11 can also be used by individuals. If you are the owner of a sole proprietorship, you are the debtor. You also do not have a separate identity from your business. Additionally, individuals will choose Chapter 11 if they can’t are unable to file Chapter 13 because their debts are too high, or their finances are complex.

    A Chapter 11 restructuring plan can help a debtor balance his or her income and expenses while also regaining profitability and continuing operations. During Chapter 11, a debtor is also able to sell some or all of his or assets to pay down debt.

    Typically, an individual will file Chapter 7 or Chapter 13, rather than Chapter 11.

    Deciding on Chapter 7 or Chapter 13

    Choosing between Chapter 13 and Chapter 7 bankruptcy is an important decision to make. Weighing both options with a bankruptcy attorney will help you decide which way to file. Also, to help your attorney help you to make the best decision, it’s necessary you provide them with accurate information regarding your finances. It’s also important to remember that some debt is not able to be discharged under either type of bankruptcy. These debts include: student loans, alimony, and child support.

    Criteria for Chapter 7 bankruptcy

    There are some criteria you will need to meet in order to be able to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

    1. Bankruptcy means test

    This test compares the state’s median monthly family income to your family’s income. You may not be able to file Chapter 7 bankruptcy if your monthly income exceeds the state’s median income. This test is required if more than half your debt comes from consumer purchases other than business, tax, or tort debts (debts for injuries or damages you caused to someone else).

    2. You are an individual, married couple filing jointly, or small business owner

    3. No recent bankruptcy discharge

    You are not legally able to file Chapter 7 bankruptcy if you had a previous Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharge within the past 8 years, or a Chapter 13 bankruptcy discharge within the past 6 years. The filing period starts the date your previous bankruptcy was filed, rather than when the bankruptcy was discharged.

    4. No recent bankruptcy dismissal

    You are not able to file Chapter 7 bankruptcy if you had a bankruptcy dismissed within the past 180 days for any of the following reasons: you violated a court order, abused the bankruptcy system, made a fraudulent bankruptcy filing, or requested a dismissal because a creditor requested the automatic stay be lifted.

    5. Credit counseling required

    To be able to file any type of bankruptcy, you are required to receive credit counseling from a government-approved credit counseling agency. You are not required to get counseling before filing bankruptcy, but it must be completed no more than 180 days prior to the bankruptcy discharge and it must include a two-hour financial management course.

    Agencies offering this management course aren’t always non-profit, but they should be able to offer free or lower cost services.

    Your bankruptcy case will be dismissed if you do not go through credit counseling within the specified time frame.

    Considering Bankruptcy?

    Because Chapter 7 can be so devastating, and can only be done once every seven years, it might be smart to weigh your particular combination of debt, income, and property before you decide it’s the option for you. And even then you might decide against it.

    How Declaring Bankruptcy Can Help

    Typically those who file for bankruptcy really do need it. Often the filer is already in a fragile economic position with large amounts of credit card debt when they are suddenly stuck with a bout of hard luck such as a loss of job, injury, divorce, or uninsured medical expenses that then result in mounting penalties and thus an unpayable amount of debt.

    Bankruptcy law was designed to help people who need assistance to make a clean and quick break from the debt. In a few months it can wipe out unsecured debt such as credit and medical debts.

    Exemption

    But even if you find yourself faced with unpayable debt, you still may not need bankruptcy to protect your assets. Under the Exemption Laws of California, you may already be “judgment-proof.” If you are declared as “judgment-proof” you need not fear credit card companies simply because of debts owed to them. Unsecured creditors such as credit card companies cannot take your stuff if it’s exempt. Harassing phone calls can be stopped with a simple phone call or letter. But it’s important to remember that interest and penalties will continue to accumulate. Also, exemption laws do not protect property from all types of debts or all types of creditors. Typically, exemption laws do not protect against collection of child support or tax debts. And if you purchased property and pledged it as collateral for the purchase-money loan the lender can still take the property, regardless of any exemption law.

    Non-dischargeable Debts

    It’s important to remember there are some kinds of debts that bankruptcy can’t get rid of called “nondischargeable” debts. This type of debt generally includes child support, most student loans, and most tax debts. Even if you decide to declare bankruptcy you are still liable to pay these.

    Working with a Bankruptcy Attorney

    Facing debt can be overwhelming. The bills can continue to pile up and the creditors can continue to harass you unless you take responsibility and take action. Working with a bankruptcy attorney to guide you through the process of debt consolidation and/or bankruptcy is the first step to getting back on to solid financial footing. The laws regarding bankruptcy can also be confusing. Because of this, it’s highly advised that you work with a bankruptcy attorney such as the ones at Resnilk Hayes Moradi that can walk you through the process and clarify any questions or concerns you might have. There can be a lot of questions during this extremely stressful time and we are happy to help you plan how to move forward with a solid financial future.

    Resnik Hayes Moradi LLP

    510 W. Sixth Street Suite 1220

    Los Angeles, CA 90014

    Phone: (213) 699-3055

    https://ibankruptcyattorneys.com

    The post U.S. Retirement Crisis appeared first on Resnik Hayes Moradi LLP.


    What is Debt Consolidation?

    Debt consolidation means that all of your smaller loans get paid off with one large loan. So you essentially get one lump sum to pay off your smaller loans so that you only have one monthly payment rather than several monthly payments. The theory behind this is one payment is easier to manage than The post What is Debt Consolidation? appeared first on Resnik Hayes Moradi...

    Debt consolidation means that all of your smaller loans get paid off with one large loan. So you essentially get one lump sum to pay off your smaller loans so that you only have one monthly payment rather than several monthly payments. The theory behind this is one payment is easier to manage than several. And the main goal is that consolidation lowers the interest rate and monthly payments while paying off your debt in a quicker amount of time.

    What Debt Consolidation Companies Do

    Here’s what a debt consolidation (a.k.a. debt management or credit counseling) does:

    • Closes credit accounts so you cannot use them.
    • Sets up an automated monthly payment based on your budget that gets distributed it to your creditors.
    • In some cases, they can negotiate lower APRs or reduced late fees with your creditors

    Debt Settlement

    It’s important to note that debt consolidation is not the same as debt settlement. Debt consolidation allows you to pay your debts in full without causing negative consequences to your credit. Debt settlement is the process of paying off debt to a creditor once a mutually agreed to sum is reached. This sum is usually less than what is owed. Typically, only unsecured debt (for example, credit cards and medical bills), is eligible for debt settlement. Debt settlement is often considered a risky process.

    Understanding Secured vs. Unsecured Loans

    A secured loan, such as a mortgage or a car loan, means you pledge the property, your home or your car, to secure the repayment of the loan. Here’s an example: you obtain a mortgage loan – the house is security for repayment. If you do not make the home, the mortgage lag lender can take the house back through the process of foreclosure to satisfy the loan.

    Unsecured loans differ in that they are based only on your promise to pay. These loans are not secured by property that can be foreclosed on or repossessed to pay back the loan. Credit cards and student loans are technically unsecured loans because there’s nothing that can be directly repossessed if the borrower does not pay the loans back. Unsecured loans have higher interest rates because they carry more risk for the lender.

    Debt Consolidation Through Secured Loans

    Debt consolidation is a little easier when it comes to secured loans. Because there are physical “securities” that exist for repayment, they are seen as safer for the lender. For example, you can refinance a home, take out a second mortgage, or get a home equity line of credit. Another example is your car loan – the automobile is used as collateral in case you cannot pay back the loan. Assets can also be used as security for a loan. A 401K loan uses your retirement fund as collateral. Life insurance policies can be used if they have cash values. Financing firms can often loan you money against lawsuit claims, lottery winnings, and annuities.

    Pros of Consolidating With Secured Loans

    Often, secured loans carry lower interest rates than unsecured loans because they are safer for lenders. This fact can help you save your money on interest payments. Lower interest rates tend to make monthly payments lower and thus more affordable. Rarely, but in some cases interest payments are even tax deductible.

    Cons of Consolidating With Secured Loans

    The biggest con of consolidating with secured loans might seem obvious: when you pledge your assets as collateral and you cannot pay back the loan, you are putting your property at risk of being foreclosed on or repossessed. If you’re unable to pay the loan back, you run the rid of losing your house, car, life insurance, retirement fund, or whatever else you might have used to secure the loan. And certain assets, such as life insurance or retirement funds, may not be available to you if the loan is not paid back before you need to use them.

    Debt Consolidation Through Unsecured Loans

    Unsecured personal debt consolidation loans used to be quite common, but they are less likely to be available to people seeking them today. Usually this type of loan requires a borrower to have very good credit. A credit card or personal loan debt for consolidation is often given with a no interest, or low interest, introductory rate. Often times this amount balloons after a specified amount of time.

    Pros of Consolidating With Unsecured Loans

    The biggest benefit to unsecured debt consolidation loan is that no property is placed at risk. Also, an interest rate might balloon to higher than the rate on a secured loan, but it can often be distributed over several different credit card balances, thereby lowering your interest burden and your payment.

    Balance Transfer Options

    Balance transfer options on no-interest or low-interest credit card offers can be a very useful tool, but they can often be tricky. Check there is no transfer fee in the fine print which negates the savings.  Also, the no-interest or low-interest period is generally limited to a set amount of months. You’ll want to be sure you can pay the debt off during this time. If not, you run the risk of paying a much higher interest rate once the period expires.

    If your debt is too high to be consolidated, you might want to consider bankruptcy. A bankruptcy attorney will be able to look at your financial situation and determine if bankruptcy is a viable option for you. They will also evaluate your options for avoiding bankruptcy if other options exist. There are many different ways to discharge your debt and find the financial relief you have been looking for.

    Working with a Bankruptcy Attorney

    Facing debt can be overwhelming. The bills can continue to pile up and the creditors can continue to harass you unless you take responsibility and take action. Working with a bankruptcy attorney to guide you through the process of debt consolidation and/or bankruptcy is the first step to getting back on to solid financial footing. The laws regarding bankruptcy can also be confusing. Because of this, it’s highly advised that you work with a bankruptcy attorney such as the ones at Resnilk Hayes Moradi  that can walk you through the process and clarify any questions or concerns you might have. There can be a lot of questions during this extremely stressful time and we are happy to help you plan how to move forward with a solid financial future.

    Resnik Hayes Moradi LLP

    510 W. Sixth Street Suite 1220

    Los Angeles, CA 90014

    Phone: (213) 699-3055

    https://ibankruptcyattorneys.com

    The post What is Debt Consolidation? appeared first on Resnik Hayes Moradi LLP.


    Can You Still Receive Social Security in Bankruptcy?

    A common question during bankruptcy is if social security payments will be garnished to pay off creditors. Below we discuss how social security is handled during both Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcies.What is Social Security?Before we discuss how Social Security is treated in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcies, it's The post Can You Still Receive Social Security in Bankruptcy? appeared first on Resnik Hayes Moradi...

    A common question during bankruptcy is if social security payments will be garnished to pay off creditors. Below we discuss how social security is handled during both Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcies.

    What is Social Security?

    Before we discuss how Social Security is treated in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcies, it’s important to review what Social Security is.

    Social Security is a program that is meant to provide funds as a form of economic security for the public. The United States Social Security program was established in 1935 and provides old age, disability, and survivors insurance, in additional to supplemental security income to elderly or disabled people.

    This money is accrued through employers and employees through Social Security taxes. Money raised from this tax program is then primarily used to provide benefits to US citizens who have reached retirement age or are otherwise currently eligible. The amount a citizen receives as their Social Security benefits is based on the amount of Social Security taxes he or she has paid over the course of their working career. This means that those who have had larger incomes tend to get greater Social Security benefits. Social Security also pays a disproportionate amount to people who have earned low incomes.

    Chapter 7

    When you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, almost all of your assets and property are liquidated and thus become property of the bankruptcy estate that is sold to allow you to repay your debts. There are some exceptions to this though.

    During your Chapter 7 bankruptcy, a bankruptcy trustee is appointed and given the authority to sell your assets so that you are able to pay your creditors.  Just because your assets are being sold, that does not mean that all of your property needs to be sold.

    Social Security and Chapter 7

    When you apply for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you are first required to take a means test that is based on the amount of income you receive. It is then determined if you have “the means” to pay back unsecured creditors. If you are receiving Social Security benefits, you are not required to include that source of income during your Chapter 7 means test.

    Means Test

    The means test will require you disclose all income from all sources, except Social Security benefits, that you have received during the six-month period prior to filing the bankruptcy. This income is then used to calculate what is called a current monthly income, or CMI.

    If your CMI is less than the median income for your specific state’s median income for a similar household, you will automatically pass the means test. This means that your household – amount of family members and income – will be compared to what the state has deemed as a similar household’s income. A family of four’s income will be compared to a family of four’s income.

    If your CMI is above the median income, that does not mean you fail the means test. In most cases, the bankruptcy petitioner will just need to answer more questions on the means test in order to qualify.

    Social Security benefits do not count as income for means test purposes, so you will not be required to list the amount of Social Security income you receive.

    Disclose Social Security Income in Budget

    While you do not need to disclose your Social Security income in the means test, you will need to disclose the amount on Schedules I of the bankruptcy paperwork. Schedule I and Schedule J are two forms that are needed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

    Schedule I: snapshot of current income at the time you file bankruptcy.

    Schedule J: list of current expenses.

    It should be noted that if your budget shows that you are receiving a large amount of disposable income every month, you can still be disqualified from being able to file for Chapter 7. This can happen even if you pass the means test.

    Because this can be a complicated process, you should work with a bankruptcy attorney to determine the best form of bankruptcy you should file for.

    Often times, people do not qualify for Chapter 7, but do qualify for Chapter 13.

    Chapter 13

    Chapter 13 bankruptcy is designed to allow you to keep all of your property, but is also determined by the type of property you own. The amount of your nonexempt property affects how much unsecured creditors get paid during your bankruptcy process. And to avoid foreclosure or repossession, you still need to keep up with the payments you make for you secured debt, such as mortgages or car loans. During Chapter 13, you repay creditors in full, or in part, during a Chapter 13 repayment plan. That plan typically lasts from three to five years, and at the end of the repayment period, your debts are discharged.

    Differences in Chapter 7 and 13 Bankruptcy

    In Chapter 13 bankruptcy, a trustee will not sell your nonexempt assets and distribute the proceeds to your creditors. That’s how it works in Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Rather, you will need to put together a repayment plan that shows your creditors how you plan to pay back some or all of your creditors. You get to keep your property in exchange for paying back a certain amount of the debt you owe. But remember that the more nonexempt assets you have, the more you will need to pay to unsecured creditors.

    When you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, a trustee takes the nonexempt property, sells it, and uses the proceeds to pay your general unsecured creditors. But because you keep all of your property with Chapter 13, it’s unfair to your unsecured creditors if they do not get paid as much as they would have had you filed for Chapter 7.

    Because of this, if you file Chapter 13 and create a repayment plan, you will still need to pay the general unsecured creditors a dividend at least equal to the value of your nonexempt assets. So if you have a large amount of nonexempt property, you hay have to repay the unsecured debts in full.

    Chapter 13 and Social Security

    While more courts are increasingly allowing debtors to keep Social Security payments in Chapter 13 bankruptcy, it will depend on where you file for bankruptcy.

    All income, including your Social Security income, needs to be disclosed on your Chapter 13 bankruptcy petition and schedules. All disposable income is required to be contributed to the repayment plan. The higher the amount of disposable income you have, the more you are required to pay unsecured creditors.

    Where You File

    Federal appellate courts have ruled that social security income should not be included in your current monthly income (CMI) if you live in the following states: Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, or Wyoming.

    Working with a Bankruptcy Attorney

    When you decide to file bankruptcy, you should consider working with an attorney. As you can see from the above, there are many factors that need to be considered during your petition. A bankruptcy attorney can advise you on the following:

    • the type of bankruptcy you should file
    • how bankruptcy can help you
    • what to expect during the process, and
    • any potential difficulties they see with your case

    Additionally, you should be able to address any questions or concerns you might have.

    The Bankruptcy Process

    Filing for bankruptcy requires you to fill out a packet of forms, including the Schedule I and Schedule J discussed above. Your bankruptcy attorney will have specialized software that helps to guide you through the process and also ensures that everything is prepared for the court. You will be required to provide information about your income, expenses, assets, and debts. Working with an attorney will ensure that the information on these forms is filled out accurately, and filed correctly.

    Bankruptcy Hearings

    You will need to attend a meeting of creditors after you file for bankruptcy. Depending on your specific filing, you might need to attend additional hearings. Your lawyer will advise you on if you need to be in attendance, or if they are able to represent you without you needing to be there, as sometimes you will not be required to be in attendance.

    At all times your lawyer will help you to understand the process, as well as ensure that the court has all the information it needs to obtain from you, in addition to any forms.

    Working with a Bankruptcy Attorney

    Facing debt can be overwhelming. The bills can continue to pile up and the creditors can continue to harass you unless you take responsibility and take action. Working with a bankruptcy attorney to guide you through the process of debt consolidation and/or bankruptcy is the first step to getting back on to solid financial footing. The laws regarding bankruptcy can also be confusing. Because of this, it’s highly advised that you work with a bankruptcy attorney such as the ones at Resnilk Hayes Moradi  that can walk you through the process and clarify any questions or concerns you might have. There can be a lot of questions during this extremely stressful time and we are happy to help you plan how to move forward with a solid financial future.

    Resnik Hayes Moradi LLP

    510 W. Sixth Street Suite 1220

    Los Angeles, CA 90014

    Phone: (213) 699-3055

    https://ibankruptcyattorneys.com

    The post Can You Still Receive Social Security in Bankruptcy? appeared first on Resnik Hayes Moradi LLP.


    Protecting Assets During Bankruptcy

    You worked hard for what you've earned but things happen and if you're at risk for losing the assets you've worked hard to achieve, you might want to consider bankruptcy. Luckily, lawmakers have put things in place to shield the assets that you've worked so hard for. Here are some of the ways you The post Protecting Assets During Bankruptcy appeared first on Resnik Hayes Moradi...

    You worked hard for what you’ve earned but things happen and if you’re at risk for losing the assets you’ve worked hard to achieve, you might want to consider bankruptcy. Luckily, lawmakers have put things in place to shield the assets that you’ve worked so hard for. Here are some of the ways you can protect your hard-earned assets even in bankruptcy.

    Laws to Protect Your Assets

    State and federal laws have been set for what assets can and can’t be garnished by creditors during bankruptcy. These include:

    • Traditional and Roth IRAs
    • Qualified Retirement Plans
    • Homesteads. Important Note: the amount of protection you will get on your home varies greatly from state to state. While some states offer unlimited protection, others other limited to no protection.
    • Annuities and Life Insurance. State laws also govern the level of protection that applies to these.

    Other Ways to Secure Assets

    Asset protection might seem to have a bad wrap, but there are legitimate ways to protect your assets. Some methods include asset protection trusts, accounts-receivable financing, stripping out your equity, and family limited partnerships.

    Understanding Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

    If you are falling behind on making payments for medical expenses and are looking for protection from lurking creditors and mounting debt, chances are you’ve considered bankruptcy. There are different kinds of bankruptcy, including Chapter 7, Chapter 13, and Chapter 11. Here’s some information about how they differ from each other.

    Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

    Chapter 7 bankruptcy essentially allows you to wipe your financial slate clean without the worry of making “past due” amounts.  Certain property is sold and then used to repay debts. If there is no property that can be resold, many of the debts will be discharged, or cancelled, once the bankruptcy case concludes.

    Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

    Chapter 13 bankruptcy allows you to reorganize your debt. You work with a bankruptcy attorney to set forth a plan to repay as much as your debt as possible during a 3-5 year period. You’ll be required by a bankruptcy court to provide detailed financial statements that support your proclaimed revenue and expenses. Once the plan is created you’ll have to make monthly payments to a trustee, who in turn pays off your creditors. Once you have completed the repayment plan, you are no longer responsible for any previous debts, even if through repayment, you were not required to pay the entire amount that was owed. Chapter 13 also stops increases on interest rates, such as the interest rate owed on a credit card. 

    Chapter 11 Bankruptcy

    While Chapter 11 is typically filed by businesses and corporations, Chapter 11 can also be used by individuals. If you are the owner of a sole proprietorship, you are the debtor. You also do not have a separate identity from your business. Additionally, individuals will choose Chapter 11 if they can’t are unable to file Chapter 13 because their debts are too high, or their finances are complex.

    A Chapter 11 restructuring plan can help a debtor balance his or her income and expenses while also regaining profitability and continuing operations. During Chapter 11, a debtor is also able to sell some or all of his or assets to pay down debt.

    Typically, an individual will file Chapter 7 or Chapter 13, rather than Chapter 11.

    Which Form Should You File?

    Choosing between Chapter 13 and Chapter 7 bankruptcy is an important decision to make. Weighing both options with a bankruptcy attorney will help you decide which way to file. Also, to help your attorney help you to make the best decision, it’s necessary you provide them with accurate information regarding your finances. It’s also important to remember that some debt is not able to be discharged under either type of bankruptcy. These debts include student loans, alimony, and child support.

    Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Criteria

    There are some criteria you will need to meet in order to be able to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

    1. Bankruptcy means test

    This test compares the state’s median monthly family income to your family’s income. You may not be able to file Chapter 7 bankruptcy if your monthly income exceeds the state’s median income. This test is required if more than half your debt comes from consumer purchases other than business, tax, or tort debts (debts for injuries or damages you caused to someone else).

    2. You are an individual, married couple filing jointly, or small business owner

    3. No recent bankruptcy discharge

    You are not legally able to file Chapter 7 bankruptcy if you had a previous Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharge within the past 8 years, or a Chapter 13 bankruptcy discharge within the past 6 years. The filing period starts the date your previous bankruptcy was filed, rather than when the bankruptcy was discharged.

    4. No recent bankruptcy dismissal

    You are not able to file Chapter 7 bankruptcy if you had a bankruptcy dismissed within the past 180 days for any of the following reasons: you violated a court order, abused the bankruptcy system, made a fraudulent bankruptcy filing, or requested a dismissal because a creditor requested the automatic stay be lifted.

    5. Credit counseling required

    To be able to file any type of bankruptcy, you are required to receive credit counseling from a government-approved credit counseling agency. You are not required to get counseling before filing bankruptcy, but it must be completed no more than 180 days prior to the bankruptcy discharge and it must include a two-hour financial management course.

    Agencies offering this management course aren’t always non-profit, but they should be able to offer free or lower cost services.

    Your bankruptcy case will be dismissed if you do not go through credit counseling within the specified time frame.

    Considering Bankruptcy?

    Chapter 7, because it wipes out all your debt and many of your assets, it can be so devastating. It also can only be done once every seven years, so it might be smart to weigh your particular combination of debt, income, and property before you decide it’s the option for you. And even then you might decide against it.

    How Declaring Bankruptcy Can Help

    Typically those who file for bankruptcy really do need it. Often the filer is already in a fragile economic position with large amounts of credit card debt when they are suddenly stuck with a bout of hard luck such as a loss of job, injury, divorce, or uninsured medical expenses that then result in mounting penalties and thus an unpayable amount of debt.

    Bankruptcy law was designed to help people who need assistance to make a clean and quick break from the debt. In a few months, it can wipe out unsecured debt such as credit and medical debts.

    Exemption

    Even if you find yourself faced with unpayable debt, you still may not need bankruptcy to protect your assets. Under the Exemption Laws of California, you may already be “judgment-proof.” If you are declared as “judgment-proof,” don’t worry. There’s no need to fear credit card companies simply because of debts owed to them. Unsecured creditors such as credit card companies cannot take your stuff if it’s exempt. Harassing phone calls can be stopped with a simple phone call or letter. But it’s important to remember that interest and penalties will continue to accumulate. Also, exemption laws do not protect property from all types of debts or all types of creditors. Typically, exemption laws do not protect against collection of child support or tax debts. And if you purchased property and pledged it as collateral for the purchase-money loan the lender can still take the property, regardless of any exemption law.

    Non-dischargeable Debts

    It’s important to remember there are some kinds of debts that bankruptcy can’t get rid of called “nondischargeable” debts. This type of debt generally includes child support, most student loans, and most tax debts. Even if you decide to declare bankruptcy you are still liable to pay these.

    Working with a Bankruptcy Attorney

    Facing debt can be overwhelming. The bills can continue to pile up and the creditors can continue to harass you unless you take responsibility and take action. Working with a bankruptcy attorney to guide you through the process of debt consolidation and/or bankruptcy is the first step to getting back on to solid financial footing. The laws regarding bankruptcy can also be confusing. Because of this, it’s highly advised that you work with a bankruptcy attorney such as the ones at Resnilk Hayes Moradi  that can walk you through the process and clarify any questions or concerns you might have. There can be a lot of questions during this extremely stressful time and we are happy to help you plan how to move forward with a solid financial future.

    Resnik Hayes Moradi LLP

    510 W. Sixth Street Suite 1220

    Los Angeles, CA 90014

    Phone: (213) 699-3055

    https://ibankruptcyattorneys.com

    The post Protecting Assets During Bankruptcy appeared first on Resnik Hayes Moradi LLP.


    Link to Category: Law Blogs

    Or if you prefer use one of our linkware images? Click here

    Blogging Fusion is a trusted resource online for bloggers around the world!