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I am an architect and this is my blog about architecture, interior design, lifestyle & photography.
Blog Added: May 16, 2017 06:14:04 AM
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Blog Country: Italy   Italy
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How to Become a Licensed Architect in Italy

How to become an architect in Italy? To enter the profession in Italy, you are required to first obtain a degree in Architecture. There are three kind of degree: Bachelor of Science 3 years Master of Science 5 years (2 years after the bachelor degree so 3+2) Single-Cycle Degree – 5 years When I started there was… Continue reading How to Become a Licensed Architect in Italy L'articolo How to Become a Licensed Architect in Italy proviene da CREATIVE APTITUDE - attitudine creativa...

How to become an architect in Italy?

To enter the profession in Italy, you are required to first obtain a degree in Architecture. There are three kind of degree:

  1. Bachelor of Science 3 years
  2. Master of Science 5 years (2 years after the bachelor degree so 3+2)
  3. Single-Cycle Degree – 5 years

When I started there was only one way to become architect: the single cycle called “laurea magistrale in architettura” (i.e.  magister degree in architecture)

In order to work in the profession and get title of architect, planner, landscape architect and conservator, corresponding to the laurea title existing legislation requires laureates to pass a state professional examination for the purposes of registering to practice (bachelor degree = junior architects, and master degree = senior architects). This examination can immediately follow academic qualification.

To sit State Professional Examination you must submit an application form at the university of your choice within the time frame and using the procedures shown noting that application deadlines and exam dates are the same across the whole country. You can submit applications to only one university.

There are two exam sessions, one in spring and one in autumn. The State Exam  now comprends four tests (three written and one oral).

It was one written and one oral tests when I did it. The writing test was basically a concept design. You could choose between urban planning, renovation, architectural design. You had 8 hours to set your idea, with skatches and everything.

I remember I chose urban planning (not because I like it, just because it was the easier) I had to design a sporting area with tennis, football, basketball along with changing rooms, parkings and everyting. The renovation topic was about the conversion into apartaments of an old schools building, while the architectural design topic was to design a loft of 60 square meters for an artist.

The oral test is very general, they can ask you almost anything, from local laws to how to make stucco and comment big architectures. I remember they ask me also to explain why  (or why not) I like  one of the latest Herzog de Meuron building.

To practice, the architect must register with the Ordine degli architetti (Order of Architects CNAPPC http://www.cnappc.it/default.aspx), which also includes planners, landscape architects and conservationists (architectural heritage). The Orders are organised by province, and registration is based on place of residence of the architect. Within the order there are currently several classes and categories, depending on specific qualifications. Continued training is compulsory since 1st January 2014 (60 credits any 3 years)

This is how to become an architect in Italy.


Today’s post is the 31st post of the series called #ArchiTalks, in which a group of  blogging’architects select a topic and the group all post on the same day and promote each other’s blogs and read varying takes on the topic. This month’s topic is The Architectural Registration Exam leads by Meghana Joshi

To read how the other blogging architects have interpreted this theme click the links below:

Matthew Stanfield – FiELD9: architecture (@FiELD9arch)
What is the Big Deal about the ARE?

Lee Calisti, AIA – Think Architect (@LeeCalisti)
what A.R.E. you willing to do 

Lora Teagarden – L² Design, LLC (@L2DesignLLC)
Take the architect registration exam, already

Eric T. Faulkner – Rock Talk (@wishingrockhome)
ARE – The Turnstile

Michele Grace Hottel – Michele Grace Hottel, Architect (@mghottel)
the architect registration exam

Brian Paletz – The Emerging Architect (@bpaletz)
I forget

Drew Paul Bell – Drew Paul Bell (@DrewPaulBell)
The Architecture Registration Exam

Jeffrey Pelletier – Board & Vellum (@boardandvellum)
What is the Benefit of Becoming a Licensed Architect?

Kyu Young Kim – J&K Atelier (@sokokyu)
Every Architect’s Agony

Nisha Kandiah – ArchiDragon (@ArchiDragon)
To do or not to do ?

Keith Palma – Architect’s Trace (@cogitatedesign)
Test or Task

Jim Mehaffey – Yeoman Architect (@jamesmehaffey)
Passing the Test

Mark Stephens – Mark Stephens Architects (@architectmark)
Part 3!

Jane Vorbrodt – Kuno Architecture (@janevorbrodt)
Seven Years of Highlighters and Post-it Notes

L'articolo How to Become a Licensed Architect in Italy proviene da CREATIVE APTITUDE - attitudine creativa -.



ArchiTalks #30: Ugly

Today’s post is the 30th post of the series called #ArchiTalks. This month’s theme: “Ugly”. Topic Lead: Jeremiah Russell. This month’s topic is awesome. We could talk for years about “ugly” and “the idea of ugliness” in architecture! Talk about beauty and you get boring answers, but talk about ugliness and things get interesting. –… Continue reading ArchiTalks #30: Ugly L'articolo ArchiTalks #30: Ugly proviene da CREATIVE APTITUDE -...

Today’s post is the 30th post of the series called #ArchiTalks. This month’s theme: “Ugly”. Topic Lead: Jeremiah Russell.

This month’s topic is awesome. We could talk for years about “ugly” and “the idea of ugliness” in architecture!

Talk about beauty and you get boring answers, but talk about ugliness and things get interesting.
– Rem Koolhaas

But what exactly makes a building ugly?

In the history the thought of beauty has always been construed as aesthetic value. According to aesthetic theories, beautiful is what gives rise to the feeling of pleasure within us. The anesthetic value of things is measured in terms of the feeling of pleasure they occasion in us.
On the opposite, Ugliness is correlated to the feeling of displeasure, and therefore associated with aesthetic disvalue and worthlessness.
Simplifying “ugly” is the opposite of “beauty”.

Since the Ancient Greeks, philosophers and architects have believed that “beauty” could be defined by such measurements, by mathematical proportions. (Symmetry and golden section above all)

The Parthenon

I think the definition of “ugly” goes a little bit farther than just pleasure visual perception.
Aesthetically pleasing building can be very ugly because of many other reasons…

  1. Building that is either out of context or ignores context, it could be the most beautifully and well made building, it could perfectly suit all the aesthetic canons but it is ugly to me.
  2. If there is no connection between inside and outside. Both the indoor spaces and the look of the facades are important. Buildings that have interesting and beautiful facades and volumes, but lack of comfortable indoors (in term of poor designs, poor details and materials, amount of natural lighting, indoor air quality and acoustic, etc) is ugly to me.
  3. Building that spatially does not suit the needs of its functions, same as above. A building always has a function that goes beyond mere aesthetics.
  4. Either incompetence or a lack of care is evident. Lots of interesting buildings are ruined by a lack of care over how they are made and made to last. It could be the most interesting building (in terms of forms, volumes, balance between full and empty spaces, lights and shadows) but if it’s all made out of poor details, cheap elements and materials that will look like trash in a few years it is ugly to me.
  5. Ugly are buildings that copy other buildings, usually other’s big pieces of architecture, but even copying ourselves’ work makes ugly (boring) buildings in my opinion. Think about many Ghery’s works. Don’t misunderstanding, I like many of his works but sometimes it just seems he copies himself (below few examples, are really all of them good architecture?)
    Weisman Art Museum, Minneapolis
    Guggenheim Museum Bilbao.
    Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles

    Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, Las Vegas.
  6. Speaking a bit about restoration (we did a lot of restoration here). An ugly restoration ignores context (in this case the building itself is the context). The point is to not let the old bits fade away, but makes the old stand out, by making the original clear and separate from the new. Redoing original making indistinguishable what is new and what is old is ugly. Pretending is ugly. On the other hand to not pay attention and respect to the original (by using not contextualized material for example) makes “ugly” designs as well.

You can find a complete list of everyone participating in this month’s #ArchiTalks below. Follow the links and read to see all the different interpretations of this topic.

 

Lee Calisti, AIA – Think Architect (@LeeCalisti)
ugly is ugly

Lora Teagarden – L² Design, LLC (@L2DesignLLC)
Ugly Architecture Details

Jeremiah Russell, AIA – ROGUE Architecture (@rogue_architect)

unsuccessful, not ugly: #architalks

Eric T. Faulkner – Rock Talk (@wishingrockhome)
Ugly is in The Details

Michele Grace Hottel – Michele Grace Hottel, Architect (@mghottel)
Ugly

Brian Paletz – The Emerging Architect (@bpaletz)

Ugly, sloppy, and wrong – oh my!

Eric Wittman – intern[life] (@rico_w)

[ugly] buildings [ugly] people

Jeffrey Pelletier – Board & Vellum (@boardandvellum)

Is My House Ugly? If You Love It, Maybe Not!

Nisha Kandiah – ArchiDragon (@ArchiDragon)

the ugly truth

Keith Palma – Architect’s Trace (@cogitatedesign)
Behold

Jim Mehaffey – Yeoman Architect (@jamesmehaffey)
A Little Ugly Never Hurt Anyone

Mark Stephens – Mark Stephens Architects (@architectmark)
Ugly or not ugly Belgian houses?

Larry Lucas – Lucas Sustainable, PLLC (@LarryLucasArch)
Die Hard: 7 Ugly Sins Killing Your Community

 

Photo credits: commons.wikimedia.org and www.widewalls.ch

L'articolo ArchiTalks #30: Ugly proviene da CREATIVE APTITUDE - attitudine creativa -.



There is no moonlighting. It’s a jungle!

Moonlighting #28 ArchiTalks I must confess that the first thing I thought, when I read this month’s #ArchiTalks  theme , was… Throwback to the ’80s! I loved that show! Anyway, now I know what moonlighting actually means, and I also get the chance to explain how being an architect in Italy is. The majority of the… Continue reading There is no moonlighting. It’s a jungle! L'articolo There is no moonlighting. It’s a jungle! proviene da CREATIVE APTITUDE -...

Moonlighting #28 ArchiTalks

I must confess that the first thing I thought, when I read this month’s #ArchiTalks  theme , was…

Moonlighting #28 ArchiTalks

Throwback to the ’80s! I loved that show! Anyway, now I know what moonlighting actually means, and I also get the chance to explain how being an architect in Italy is.

The majority of the architects in Italy start their careers as freelancers  – or a kind of –  because almost no architecture studio would hire employees.
This kind of freelancers are called il popolo delle partite IVA (The people of the partite IVA) by newspapers.

Now I need to explain what IVA and Partita IVA are, because if you want to work as freelance architect in Italy you have to “open your own Partita IVA” – sometimes you are forced to –
IVA (Imposta sul Valore Aggiunto) is a goods and services tax, basically it’s the Italian standard Value Added Tax  (it exists throughout the European Union). Any business has to be registered for IVA purposes.
It’s a tax applied to purchases – items and services – The prices are increased by this tax, which is a percentage of the net price. Freelancers are obliged to include IVA on services that they supply to clients, they collect IVA for the government and then pay it any 3 months. They also are entitled to a IVA deduction for the IVA they pay on the goods and services they acquire that they need to work. The tax they have paid for such purchases can be deducted from the tax they charge to their customers. The government only receives the difference.

Basically you don’t pay IVA for the computer you purchase to work, because you need it to produce “the goods you sell to customers”. The clients pay IVA at the very end of the production process. I’ve tried to simplify I hope it is clear.

The “Partita IVA” is the registration number the taxing authority gives to you, freelancer architect, to identify you when you pay your taxes.

Freelance architects are paid as a percentage on the design they have worked on – when the clients will paid the main studio – and the architects who have commissioned them to do a part of the designs pay as a normal client: net price + IVA. So as a young architect, you can work for other architects (more than one studio) and have your own clients at the same time.

Theorically.

In most cases you will work just for one architect, in his studio because you need that, and because you don’t have the money to buy an office, softwares, printers, etc… and you will not have the time to work for anyone else at the same time. So basically you will become an employee without being it, without having the rights that the State assures to employees. More than real entrepreneur you will be precarious worker forced to self-employment.

In this scenario there is no moolighting. It’s a jungle!

What about me?

I had the chance to get a fixed-term working contract (6 months + other 6) when I started but I wasn’t allowed to open my own partita IVA. The firm didn’t want to risk moonlighting! Then they asked me to join the association. After 9 years things are a little bit changed, the studio is smaller now, but we are still here.
I know architects who work a second job, but a different kind of job – for example running a bed & breakfast! –  and a few who ended up quitting the profession. The recession made its victims.

 


This is the 28th entry in a series titled “ArchiTalks” and the topic was “Moonlighting”

 

If you would like to see how other architects from around the globe responded to today’s topic just follow the links below.

 

Bob Borson – Life of An Architect (@bobborson)
Should Architects Moonlight?

Jeff Echols – Architect Of The Internet (@Jeff_Echols)
The Ironic Blasphemy of Moonlighting and what Architects are Missing Out On

Lee Calisti, AIA – Think Architect (@LeeCalisti)
moonlighting more than an 80s sitcom

Lora Teagarden – L² Design, LLC (@L2DesignLLC)
Moon(lighting) changes with the seasons

Collier Ward – One More Story (@BuildingContent)
Moonlighting

Jeremiah Russell, AIA – ROGUE Architecture (@rogue_architect)
hustle and grind: #architalks

Michael Riscica AIA – Young Architect (@YoungArchitxPDX)
Moonlighting for Young Architects

Stephen Ramos – BUILDINGS ARE COOL (@BuildingsRCool)
Architects do it All Night Long

Brian Paletz – The Emerging Architect (@bpaletz)
Starlight, moonlight – tick tock

Jeffrey Pelletier – Board & Vellum (@boardandvellum)
Is Moonlighting Worth It? Probably Not, But We All Try.

Kyu Young Kim – J&K Atelier (@sokokyu)
Dancing in the Moonlight

Keith Palma – Architect’s Trace (@cogitatedesign)a
The Howling

Jim Mehaffey – Yeoman Architect (@jamesmehaffey)
Moonlighting: or Why I Kept My Dayjob.

Tim Ung – Journey of an Architect (@timothy_ung)
An Alternative to Moonlighting as a Young Architect

Mark Stephens – Mark Stephens Architects (@architectmark)
Architalks 28 Moonlighting

Gabriela Baierle-Atwood – Gabriela Baierle-Atwood (@gabrielabaierle)
On Moonlighting

Jane Vorbrodt – Kuno Architecture (@janevorbrodt)
Crafted Moonlighting

 

 

L'articolo There is no moonlighting. It’s a jungle! proviene da CREATIVE APTITUDE - attitudine creativa -.



Mentorship

Today’s post  is the 27th post in a group series called #ArchiTalks (leads by Bob Borson) in which a group of us architects write about the same topic on the same day and share each other’s posts. This month’s theme is “Mentorship”. Topic lead by Michael La Valley.   This is the first #ArchiTalks’ post that… Continue reading Mentorship L'articolo Mentorship proviene da CREATIVE APTITUDE - attitudine creativa...

Today’s post  is the 27th post in a group series called #ArchiTalks (leads by Bob Borson) in which a group of us architects write about the same topic on the same day and share each other’s posts. This month’s theme is “Mentorship”. Topic lead by Michael La Valley.

 

This is the first #ArchiTalks’ post that I write and, first of all, I want to say that I’m glad to be part of this.

Historically, young aspiring architects worked in the atelier of an experienced architect, learning by doing. Each architect-builder selected a bright young man as apprentice. Over the years, working together, the apprentice would learn all the master had to share. He might even surpass him.

When I graduated with my Master Degree in Architecture in 2005, I would had liked to apply for the Leonardo Da Vinci.

Mentorship in architecture #ArchiTalks
For those who don’t know it’s a UE’s project for international workplacements designed for recent graduates, who want to develop a working experience abroad in a professional context for a limited period of time. The aim of the project is to encourage young who look for employment opportunities and increasing the mobility of workers across Europe. The focus lies on offering qualified support through a dedicated mentoring network to recent graduates who are approaching to work. It’s a way to advising and training young architect with less experiences to help them develop in their work.

If you apply for the project, and you are selected, UE gives you a grant as a contribution to travel and subsistence costs but obviously that’s not enough.

So first I needed money to start this my new-life-plan, therefore I looked for work and my life as an architect began.

I started to work in a small designing studio and I’m still here, as associate. I’ve never applied for the Leonardo Da Vinci

Although I have never joined any official mentoring program, I believe that all of us, in our lives have, or have had,  a guide.  It could be a parent, a relative, a class-teacher, a friend or a senior person in your workplace. We all have people who help us to reach our goals, a lots of mentors, not just one.  In fact, the mentorship relationships are often informal and casual. There is always something to learn from someone if you are willing to learn. No matter what level of skill you start at, you always need help and advice along the way.

I have had lots of mentors throughout my young career. I started working – for free – in an architecture studio when I was at the High School, during the Summer breaks. Even though I was only a teenager – who basically only  draw and did copies – I had the chance to see “how thing works”.  I also had a work experience at the local Ufficio Lavori Pubblici (Office of Public Works) where the architect in charge brought me into construction sites with him.

At the Faculty of Architecture in Genoa I can mention a few professors which mentored me (Pietro Carlo Pellegrini, Massimo Corradi, B. Paolo Torsello, Bruno Gabrielli, who sadly passed away two years ago)

When I started studying buildings design at the High School – in the ’90s – Designing projects using drafting tables still was the normality.

Mentorship in architecture #ArchiTalks Rapidographs, tracing paper and razor blades were our best friends! Just a few used Autocad.
I remember that there was an optional course for those students who wanted to learn the computer aided design.

When I was studying at the University only students drew boards by hand, and because they MUST learn drawing, but nobody used drafting tables anymore. Architects still sketching a lot, of course, so we need tracing paper and pen yet… but Autocad, Plotters, Photoshop, 3D Studio Max were “the architect’s tools”
Now  the preparation of design drawings has been revolutionised again by the emergence of BIM.

Having mentors to learn from is important to profession development. Senior and young architects both need each other, they have to learn from each other. Developing design projects, we create the right context for an exchange of abilities between different generations. Our profession is dynamic, the technology and the tools we use are in changing and all is recognizably different from years ago.

 


Follow the links to the others in the #ArchiTalks group who are posting about “Mentorship”

Bob Borson – Life of An Architect (@bobborson)
This is NOT Mentorship

Marica McKeel – Studio MM (@ArchitectMM)
ArchiTalks: Mentorship

Jeff Echols – Architect Of The Internet (@Jeff_Echols)
Mentors, Millennials and the Boomer Cliff

Mark R. LePage – EntreArchitect (@EntreArchitect)
Influence

Lora Teagarden – L² Design, LLC (@L2DesignLLC)
ArchiTalks: Mentorship

Collier Ward – One More Story (@BuildingContent)
Mentorship

Jeremiah Russell, AIA – ROGUE Architecture (@rogue_architect)
teach them the way they should go: #architalks

Eric T. Faulkner – Rock Talk (@wishingrockhome)
Bad Mentor, Good Mentor

Stephen Ramos – BUILDINGS ARE COOL (@sramos_BAC)
The Top 3 Benefits for Architects to Mentor and to be Mentored

Brian Paletz – The Emerging Architect (@bpaletz)
I’ve got a lot to learn

Emily Grandstaff-Rice – Emily Grandstaff-Rice FAIA (@egrfaia)
Gurus, Swamis, and Other Architectural Guides

Jarod Hall – di’velept (@divelept)
The Lonely Mentor

Drew Paul Bell – Drew Paul Bell (@DrewPaulBell)
Advice From My Mentor

Jeffrey Pelletier – Board & Vellum (@boardandvellum)
Mentoring with Anecdotes vs. Creating a Culture of Trust

Samantha R. Markham – The Aspiring Architect (@TheAspiringArch)
Why every Aspiring Architect needs SCARs

Nisha Kandiah – ArchiDragon (@ArchiDragon)
Mentorship : mend or end ?

Keith Palma – Architect’s Trace (@cogitatedesign)
Mentor5hip is…

Jim Mehaffey – Yeoman Architect (@jamesmehaffey)
My Mentor

Tim Ung – Journey of an Architect (@timothy_ung)
5 Mentors that are in my life

Mark Stephens – Mark Stephens Architects (@architectmark)
Mentorship

Gabriela Baierle-Atwood – Gabriela Baierle-Atwood (@gabrielabaierle)
On Mentorship

Lee Calisti, AIA – Think Architect (@LeeCalisti)
mentor was on the odyssey

 

L'articolo Mentorship proviene da CREATIVE APTITUDE - attitudine creativa -.



Tropical Eclectic Style. The new H&M Home collection.

A further proof that, this year, jungle influences are trendy in fashion and interior design is also the latest H&M Home collection: “ECLECTIC STYLE TROPICAL TOUCH” With the approaching Summer revitalize your home with a tropical touch! This is the message that H&M wants to spread.  Pink pastel and fuchsia, emerald green and sage green, blue… Continue reading Tropical Eclectic Style. The new H&M Home collection. L'articolo Tropical Eclectic Style. The new...

A further proof that, this year, jungle influences are trendy in fashion and interior design is also the latest H&M Home collection: “ECLECTIC STYLE TROPICAL TOUCH”

Tropical Eclectic Style. The new H&M Home collection.

With the approaching Summer revitalize your home with a tropical touch! This is the message that H&M wants to spread. 

Tropical Eclectic Style. The new H&M Home collection.
Tropical Eclectic Style. The new H&M Home collection.
Tropical Eclectic Style. The new H&M Home collection.
Tropical Eclectic Style. The new H&M Home collection.
Pink pastel and fuchsia, emerald green and sage green, blue and yellow lemon. Pastel tones combined with bright colors and large tropical inspired prints. These are the ingredients of the collection proposed by H&M.

Tropical Eclectic Style. The new H&M Home collection.

Tropical Eclectic Style. The new H&M Home collection.

Tropical Eclectic Style. The new H&M Home collection.

 

L'articolo Tropical Eclectic Style. The new H&M Home collection. proviene da CREATIVE APTITUDE - attitudine creativa -.



Urban Jungle interiors trend: how to decorate in this style

  Urban Jungle di creaptitude  The urban jungle interior trend identifies a decorative style that sees nature as the protagonist. It’s a real philosophy of living. Style developed in America, on trend since a while, it might be the color of the year, but even 2017 is marked by the consolidation of this trend. With… Continue reading Urban Jungle interiors trend: how to decorate in this style L'articolo Urban Jungle interiors trend: how to decorate in this style proviene da...

 

Urban Jungle interiors trend how to decorate in this style

Urban Jungle di creaptitude 

The urban jungle interior trend identifies a decorative style that sees nature as the protagonist. It’s a real philosophy of living.

Style developed in America, on trend since a while, it might be the color of the year, but even 2017 is marked by the consolidation of this trend. With the arrival of spring everything is green, and at home we feel the desire to bring this nuance.

So let’s look at what the basic features of the Urban Jungle are:

  1. Enrich the interiors with plants from the lush foliage, just like a tropical jungle. Rampants and tropical plants, palms, ficus, and succulents, but also magnolia, calla lilies and orchids.
  2. Use natural materials: wood, bamboo, rattan, stone for furniture and natural fibers such as cotton, linen and rope for textiles.
  3. References to nature in prints of fabrics, wallpaper, paintings and decorations in general.
  4. Color palettes where green is the protagonist. Not only in the “greenery” nuance. Together with yellow and pink accents, on light and dark backgrounds.

But how to interpret this style in a personal way?

Decorate the house with the plants.

The simplest way is to use apartment plants and flowers, creating real gardens in your home. I’ve already mentioned something here.

Urban Jungle interiors trend how to decorate in this style

 

Renovate fabrics.

Choose decorative fabrics in natural fibers and with jungle inspired prints: curtains, pillows, carpets, etc.

Change the color of the walls.

Operation that we often face in this time of year. Those who dare can use wallpaper with jungle prints. Wallpapers have come back to life and now they are one of the most trendy trends. My advice in this case is to be careful and not get carried away! Avoid hanging wallpaper all over the room. It’s better to use it wisely to add character to a wall, a niche, or use it as a backdrop for a bookcase.
Urban Jungle interiors trend how to decorate in this style

Urban Jungle Wallpapers di creaptitude 

Choose the decorations.

Prints and paintings depicting nature and, more generally, jungles. Vases and ornaments in natural materials or depicting nature.

Urban Jungle interiors trend how to decorate in this styleUrban Jungle artset di creaptitude

My advice to interpreting Urban Jungle’s trend is to not use wallpapers. The final effect is too strong.  Prefer light colors for the walls (white, rope or beige). Insert green and pink accents (pastel or fuchsia) by using paintings and printed fabrics … and naturally enrich the interiors with so many plants!

L'articolo Urban Jungle interiors trend: how to decorate in this style proviene da CREATIVE APTITUDE - attitudine creativa -.



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