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Country Regional : United States : Indiana

Indiana is a U.S. state located in the Midwestern and Great Lakes regions of North America. Indiana is the 38th largest by area and the 16th most populous of the 50 United States. Its capital and largest city is Indianapolis.


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Victim’s attorney: ‘I see felonies in those videos’ from Monroe Lake altercation

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (WISH) -- The Indiana Department of Natural Resources said Monday it's continuing to investigate two days after a battery report on Monroe Lake, and a rally and march Monday outside the Monroe County Courthouse and through Bloomington included the victim of the reported battery and the mayor. Video of the march [...] The post Victim’s attorney: ‘I see felonies in those videos’ from Monroe Lake altercation appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News |...

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (WISH) — The Indiana Department of Natural Resources said Monday it’s continuing to investigate two days after a battery report on Monroe Lake, and a rally and march Monday outside the Monroe County Courthouse and through Bloomington included the victim of the reported battery and the mayor.

Video of the march posted on social media show a car hitting protesters near the Courthouse square. Two different cellphone videos show a car moving with at least one person on the hood of the vehicle. Another person appears to be dragged by the car in one video. The other video shows emergency responders at the scene.

Bloomington Police Department declined to comment about the Monday night incident shown on social media. A Monroe County dispatcher told News 8 to call back on Tuesday.

The march of hundreds of people Monday night came after a viral Facebook post from Vauhxx Booker, a member of the Monroe County Human Rights Commission. Booker says he was attending a lunar eclipse viewing party Saturday night at Monroe Lake when he was accosted.

I don’t want to recount this, but I was almost the victim of an attempted lynching. I don’t want this to have happened…

Posted by Vauhxx Rush Booker on Sunday, July 5, 2020

News 8’s Sierra Hignite spoke with Booker’s attorney, who expects criminal charges to be filed.

“I see felonies in those videos,” said Katherine Liell, Booker’s attorney. “Of all people to pick on and to attack, he will not stand by silently and neither will the members of our community. Nor will I.”

Booker says a dispute over crossing private property occurred, then he learned that the event organizer was not the property owner. He says that people in the group were yelling “white power” at his group of friends.

He says an attempt to smooth things over led to people following him down a trail, then jumping him from behind.

He says five people overwhelmed him and that he was pinned against a tree, with someone saying “get a noose,” according to Booker. Booker says someone also threatened to break his arm.

“I was absolutely certain that they were trying to kill me but I refuse to be another hashtag,” Booker said.

Video of a physical altercation and argument was included in Booker’s post and has garnered national attention being viewed more than 3.5 million times by Monday night. Booker says that as the altercation continued more people started to gather recording video’s on their phones and yelling for the men to let him go.

“There was a very disheartening moment when where one of the women in the crowd yells, ‘You’re going to kill him,” Booker said.

“These men were confident that they could grab my body and do with me what they will and that there would be no repercussions and so far they appear to be right,” Booker said.

No one was arrested at the time, Booker said.

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources on Sunday night would only confirm conservation officers responded to a “call for service” and the incident was under investigation. Late Monday afternoon, the department said in a news release that the “call for service” involved a battery about 8 p.m. Saturday “on private property adjacent to Monroe Reservoir property.”

“DNR is investigating after a 911 call was transferred to Indiana Conservation Officer Central Dispatch. Additional investigation and interviews are underway,” the Monday news release said. “The Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Law Enforcement Division is working diligently with the Monroe County Prosecutor’s Office to ensure a lawful resolution. This matter remains under investigation and no further information will be released at this time.”

News 8 has filed a request for public record with DNR, requesting all written police reports and any other documentation regarding the incident.

A group of people — including Booker and Bloomington Mayor John Hamilton — gathered late Monday afternoon for a rally outside the Monroe County Courthouse. News 8’s Demie Johnson reported from the rally on Facebook Live.

Group beginning to march in Bloomington after protesting on courthouse square for nearly two hours WISH-TV

Posted by Demie Johnson on Monday, July 6, 2020

News 8 has reached out to the Monroe County Prosecutor’s Office but has not heard back.

WISH-TV reached out to Gov. Eric Holcomb, a Republican, and Woody Myers, the Democratic Party gubernatorial candidate, for comment. A spokesperson for Holcomb declined to comment, referring to a DNR news release sent late Monday afternoon. Myers’ campaign had not responded by Monday afternoon.

Statements

On behalf of the City of Bloomington, we would like to express outrage and grief relating to two apparent racially motivated incidents reported in our community over the July 4 weekend. A group of individuals physically assaulted and denounced and threatened with racial epithets one Black resident of Bloomington on nearby Indiana state park land at Lake Monroe. And a sheriff’s deputy from a neighboring county questioned and detained another Black Bloomington resident walking down the Bloomington street where they live in an apparent example of racial profiling. These separate incidents exemplify the persistence of racism and bias in our country and our own community. They deserve nothing less than our collective condemnation. They require that we come together as a whole, and recognize that racism damages all of us, not just our residents of color. We deserve better, and we must make it happen. Videos of the events remind us of the importance of witnesses and witnessing. Each of us must do our part to assure justice for those harmed in this weekend’s incidents, and do everything we can to forge inclusion and equity in Bloomington, and beyond.

Bloomington Mayor John Hamilton and Clerk Nicole Bolden

“Over the weekend, a complaint was made regarding a racial incident near Monroe Lake, on Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) property.

“Indiana Conservation Officers responded to that call, as it is in the jurisdiction of that agency. The Monroe County Sheriff’s Office had no involvement in responding to the complaint.

“The past few hours, MCSO has received inquiries and requests to become involved. It appears other local police agencies have received similar communication.

“The expression of confidence in our ability to handle such a serious matter is appreciated, MCSO has no involvement in this event, and has no oversight responsibility over an agency empowered by the State of Indiana.

“Any inquiries, or concerns would best be made to IDNR or other State office.”

Monroe County Sheriff Brad Swain

“Many of you have contacted our office asking that I take action on the viral incident that occurred over the holiday weekend in Monroe County and I wanted you to know what actions I have taken thus far.

“First, I condemn these actions. The videos are repulsive to the say the least and the fear that Mr. Booker must have felt is chilling. This incident is yet another example that racism and white supremacy is right here in our own backyard. This incident should have everyone shaken to the core of their being. No one should ever experience what Mr. Booker had to endure. In my opinion, this incident needs to be investigated as a hate crime.

“I have made contact with the Monroe County Prosecutor’s Office to share the videos that were sent to me. I have also made contact with DNR and the State Police.

“From what I know, the investigation is still ongoing and not much information is being shared because of the pending investigation. Please know this situation is receiving my highest attention and I will be monitoring it very closely. There are still many questions that need to be answered. I have spoken to Mr. Booker by phone today and we had a nice chat despite the circumstances. He told me this, “although physically I’m ok, spiritually…I’m hungry for justice.” I, too, want that for him.”

Indiana state Sen. J.D. Ford, a Democrat from Indianapolis, on Twitter

“Early this morning I was shocked and horrified to learned of a senseless assault against Mr. Vauhxx Booker near Lake Monroe over the weekend. Let there be no mistake – Mr. Booker was attacked for no other reason than the color of his skin. This was a hate crime.

“This attack shocks our collective conscience and cries out for justice. It is an example of the racism that is ever prevalent in our nation, in our own communities, and a further example of the flaws and failures in our system to appropriately address it. It illustrates the need for meaningful, comprehensive hate crimes legislation; for policy reforms that reshape our criminal justice processes and implement the IBLC reforms; and for enhanced training protocols that root out racism in our law enforcement and enable good officers to fairly enact the law.

“There can be no place for the hateful, belligerent conduct witnessed this weekend. I am urging our law enforcement community, including our local Prosecutor, to take swift action in investigating this incident and bringing charges against all the perpetrators.

“It is time our society change. We must all join in unequivocally denouncing racism and white supremacy where we see it. We must show our commitment to the values of equality by implement a system that enables all our citizens to enjoy it. It is not enough to demand justice in this incident, but to demand it in all incidents. An offense like this against one of us, is an offense against all of us.”

Adam Dickey, chair, Indiana’s North District Democratic Party

“I am horrified to hear about this racist attack over the holiday weekend. This is not just an issue of violence; this is clearly a hate crime and must be treated as such.

“I call on Governor Holcomb to immediately suspend the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) officers involved pending further investigation. After viewing the videos of three individuals pinning a black man to a tree so that he couldn’t breath, among a stream of racial slurs, the DNR officers had clear evidence that a crime had been committed and immediate corrective action should have been taken.

“There is no law against ignorance and no law against the probable angry verbal exchange that preceded this violence, but we do have laws that protect people from physical attacks and intimidation. The men in question should have been removed from the park and taken into custody, pending charges. It is possible that the DNR officers were also intimidated by the group and afraid to take action. However, they could have called for backup, and allowing this crime to take place without immediate consequences both condones and emboldens this kind of violence.

“A crime of violence is one thing. Because this violence was accompanied by continuous racial slurs and angry comments about a black person out with white friends, it should be elevated to a hate crime. If it had been a white person out with other white friends, this would not have happened. Clearly, this man was attacked because he was black. The DNR’s inaction must be investigated. This tragedy should serve as a reminder to all of us that racism is unfortunately alive and well, and we need clear reform of law enforcement so that we can hold perpetrators accountable.”

Indiana state Sen. Mark Stoops, a Democrat from Bloomington

“For Black Hoosiers, the existential threat posed by racism creeps into every aspect of life. It is ceaseless and knows no boundaries. It found its way onto the shores of Lake Monroe and undoubtedly similar hateful events occur across our state every day. Sometimes they are acute and visible as they were on Lake Monroe, and sometimes they occur silently as a result of bias — implicit or otherwise.

“We must do better. The events in Monroe County and those that go unwitnessed except by those who bear them are an aching reminder that until injustice is addressed, there is no justice. It’s a reminder to redouble our efforts to make progress by electing leaders willing to acknowledge and face systemic racism head on. It’s a reminder that change begins with us and we are charged with the action needed to move Indiana forward.”

John Zody, Indiana Democratic Party chairman

“The apparent racially-motivated incidents that occurred this weekend in Bloomington, Indiana, and Lake Monroe further remind us of the epidemic of bigotry that plagues our entire nation. We Hoosiers must continue coming together to condemn hate and demand that every one of us is treated with dignity and respect, regardless of our background. It’s clear, however, we still have a long way to go to achieve that. I stand with these individuals who were targeted over the weekend, and all the people who have been the target of bigotry. I also urge local authorities to fully investigate these incidents to ensure the people who committed these acts are brought to justice. We will not let hate win.”

U.S. Rep. André Carson, a Democrat from Indianapolis, on Twitter

“Indiana University stands for ideals that are incompatible with the scourge of racism. Ever as we have been collectively and actively discussing the persistence of racism, a local incident reminds all of us in the IU Bloomington community that awareness is not enough. We must work to fight against these ideas until all in our community feel safe.”

James C. Wimbush, vice president for diversity, equity and multicultural affairs and dean of Indiana University, on Twitter

“The video of the brutal beating and attempted lynching of Vauhxx Booker that was shared yesterday is further evidence of the continued harm to Black and Brown Americans as a result of over 400 years of racism in America. Black and Brown Hoosiers should not have to fear for their lives, only to have them ripped away through the use of vigilante force and violence. Our communities know all too well that this could’ve happened to any of us and that is a deep hurt for the Black community and one that we continue to bear. The time has come for real change

“Today, I am grateful for the strength and resilience of Vauhxx Booker. I am grateful that he is able to share the experience of this lived trauma, even though he should never have to. No one should ever be subjected to this particular kind of vigilante terrorism that is rooted in hate and fear, rooted in a power structure that no caring or decent person would ever support. Some might think that Vauhxx is lucky, and I just disagree. The fact is that he never should’ve had to go through this: he nor any Black Americans shouldn’t have to be ‘lucky’ to not get lynched in America today.

“Today, I am thankful that he is alive. I’ve been speaking with Vauhxx about what happened and how I can help, how our community can help. For those that don’t know, Vauhxx is someone who actively does the work of creating structural change in our communities. He is someone who is willing to take on deeply entrenched power structures. He is motivated by a bold vision of an equitable America and he takes action to create an America that lives up to the ideals of justice and freedom for all. While he and I are separated by an hour drive and we live in two different cities, I’m proud to be connected to him through a shared vision and in doing this essential work of changemaking in our communities.

“What happened to Vauhxx is inhumane and unjust and I want everyone to know that I am joining him in a fight for justice using the legal system: this is what he has asked all of us to do. I ask you to join in that fight as well. As more information becomes available in the days and weeks ahead, we all will be called to help Vauhxx in the way that he asks us to and through his leadership. We must continue to walk down the path of justice and freedom together because as Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said, ‘No one is free until we are all free.’

“I cannot comprehend the kind of trauma and grief that Vauhxx is living with and feeling at this very moment. The haunting reality is that he has lived through this and he knows that thousands of other Black Americans before him have not. I know that this trauma will be carried with him for the rest of his life and he is changed forever. I will continue to lift up Vauhxx, his family, and his friends in prayer in the months and years to come. I hope that he will be able to find healing in peace in his life.

“The time has come for real work and progress on these issues. We have the ability to make change that ends vigilante terrorism and violence but we must have bold leaders who are committed to doing the work, bold leaders who will take on the dysfunctional systems and create new American systems that respect the humanity and liberty of all Hoosiers and Americans.

“This attempted lynching and brutal beating are rooted in a system of hate that must be undone. It is forefront on my mind that this will test the bounds and effectiveness of the recently approved Indiana hate crimes legislation. We all should be attentive to any limitations in that law and we must work to remedy them immediately in 2021. As your State Senator, I will support legislation for a comprehensive hate crimes bill that would ensure that this kind of hate does not continue as an injustice. We have a lot of work to do in Indiana. As State Senator, I won’t just fight for change, I will lead it.”

Belinda Drake, of Indianapolis, Democratic Party candidate for Indiana State Senate in District 32

The post Victim’s attorney: ‘I see felonies in those videos’ from Monroe Lake altercation appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana Traffic.


Indiana schools could reopen with limited class time, 1-way hallways, plastic barriers

Monday was the day some districts slowly and very carefully began reopening activities such as sports and band camps. The post Indiana schools could reopen with limited class time, 1-way hallways, plastic barriers appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana...

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — News 8 got a clearer picture Monday of how things could look at K-12 schools when the new school year starts.

Renee Taylor, an Indianapolis parent, has an idea of how the upcoming school year could look at her children’s high school, but she’s not sure how it will pan out.

“They’re talking about a rotation (of days with online and in-class sessions). I’m just not that secure with it because I have a senior and a freshman, and I’m hoping that they’re on the same schedules,” Taylor said. “Some students do well online; some students are struggling. So, it’s nice that they will rotate.”

Monday was the day some districts slowly and very carefully began reopening activities such as sports and band camps. A spokesman for Indiana Department of Education told News 8 it’s seen schools take a scaled approach.

“In Stage 1, for instance, there’s a limit to the number of hours,” said Adam Baker, an Indiana Department of Education spokesperson. “I believe, I believe it’s 15 hours that a students can participate. There’s a limit to the number of days that an activity can actually take place. There’s a limit to the number of hours in that day. It’s just to get students back on those habits. It’s to make sure you’re keeping students safe.”

The Department of Education’s Baker said districts are working with local health departments to create plans to keep children safe from COVID-19. “We’ve seen schools that begin to work on their hallways. What does that look like going down a hallway? Just like a grocery store, are we going to make some hallways one-way, some two-ways? We’ve seen a lot of districts talk about ‘Let’s install plastic barriers or some sort of plexiglass in our high-traffic public areas.'”

News 8 also got an idea of how things could look inside some classrooms.

On Friday, Indianapolis Classical Schools — which includes Herron High School and Riverside High School — sent parents its plan for the 20-21 school year. Indianapolis Classical Schools said, of the return-to-school plans suggested, the one that seemed most prudent and safest included splitting students into different groups. For instance, Group 1 will be in schools Mondays and Tuesday while Group 2 will do online learning on those days; the process will reverse that for Thursdays and Fridays.

Also, their schools will be cleaned daily, the plan says.

The Indianapolis Classical Schools will send its COVID-19 procedures and policies to parents on July 17.

Statements

“First of all, I want to thank you for your patience as we have worked through all the possible return-to-school scenarios. Each time we thought we had landed on a workable plan and we began to sort through the details, we discovered flaws that caused us to start over.

“We do have a plan that we think will work best for our students, families, and teachers/staff. However, we will remain nimble and make decisions based on science.

“On Friday, July 17, 2020, we will send out our complete COVID-19 procedures and policies. This document will be extremely thorough and will address the details of our plans. Also, on July 17, we will send a survey that allows each family to choose our return-to-school option or our full virtual option.

The return-to-school plan that seems the most prudent and safest is a hybrid plan. 

“·We plan to divide each school’s students into two cohorts. 

“·Cohort 1 will be in schools on Mondays and Tuesdays. Cohort 2 will do online learning on these days.

“· Wednesdays will be a virtual office hour day as well a deep cleaning day. (Both schools will be thoroughly cleaned each day, but Wednesdays will be a heavy cleaning day.)

“· Cohort 2 will be in schools on Thursdays and Fridays. Cohort 1 will do online learning those days.

“· This rotation continues throughout the school year unless shifting circumstances require a change.

“The Cohorts will be split as evenly as possible. We will make sure families and carpool groups are in the same cohort. 

“While some of our sports will start practicing soon, we are implementing more safeguards than the IHSAA recommends. You can read all of the details about our return-to-play plans at goriversideathletics.com and goherronathletics.com. 

“I hope you and your family are well and that you can enjoy the July 4th holiday.

Janet H. McNeal, president of Indianapolis Classical Schools, in a letter to “schools families”

“As outlined in our letter to ICS families, our current plan is based on the results of in-depth surveys of both our student families and our staff.We continued to bolster our e-learning capabilities following this past Spring semester, so that we can remain proactive and flexible as the COVID-19 situation develops.Our in-person, e-learning and cleaning plans are based on the CDC-advised recommendations for social distancing and small class sizes.”

Shannon Dawson, director of public relations for Indianapolis Classical Schools

“Custodial teams have been performing deep cleaning in buildings in preparation for staff to return to buildings to prepare for students returning to school.”

Carrie Black, Indianapolis Public Schools spokesperson

Coronavirus links

Indiana coronavirus timeline

With updated information from the Indiana Department of Health on July 6, this timeline reflects updated tallies of deaths and positive tests prior to that date.

  • March 6: Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) confirms the first case in Indiana. Officials say the Marion County resident had recently traveled to Boston to attend a BioGen conference as a contractor.
  • March 8: ISDH confirms a second case. An adult in Hendricks County who had also traveled to the BioGen conference was placed in isolation. Noblesville Schools say a parent and that parent’s children will be self-quarantining after attending an out-of-state event where someone else tested positive.
  • March 9: Avon Community School Corp. says a student on March 8 tested positive.
  • March 10: ISDH launches an online tracker. Ball State University basketball fans learn the Mid-American Conference tourney will have no fans in the stands. Three businesses operating nursing homes in Indiana announce they will no longer allow visitors.
  • March 11: The Indianapolis-based NCAA announces the Final Four basketball tournaments will be conducted with essential staff and limited family attendance. The Big Ten announces all sports events, including the men’s basketball tournament at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, will have no fans starting March 12. Ball State University suspends in-person classes the rest of the spring semester. NBA suspends all games, including the Indiana Pacers, until further notice. Butler University and the University of Indianapolis extend spring break, after which they will have virtual classes.
  • March 12: Gov. Eric Holcomb announces new protections that led to extended public school closings and the cancellation of large events across the state. The NCAA cancels its basketball tournaments. The Big Ten suspends all sporting events through the winter and spring seasons. The league including the Indy Fuel hockey team suspends its season. Indy Eleven says it will reschedule four matches. Indianapolis’ annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade is canceled. 
  • March 13: The Indiana High School Athletic Association postpones the boys basketball tournament. Wayzata Home Products, a Connersville cabinet maker, shuts down and lays off its entire workforce due to market uncertainty. Gov. Holcomb announces actions including the elimination of Medicaid co-pays for COVID-19 testing and the lifting of limits on the number of work hours per day for drivers of commercial vehicles. Franklin College says it will begin online classes March 18 and empty residence halls of students in two days. The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis closes indefinitely. The Indianapolis Public Library joins other libraries across Indiana and closes all facilities indefinitely.
  • March 14: The Indiana Gaming Commission says all licensed gaming and racing operations will close in two days for an indefinite period.
  • March 15: Indiana had its first death. St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis announces it will suspend all elective, non-urgent surgeries.
  • March 16: Indiana had its second death. Gov. Holcomb announced the first Hoosier death. He closes bars, restaurants and nightclubs to in-person patrons, but maintains carryout and delivery services.
  • March 17: Indiana had its third and fourth deaths. ISDH announces Indiana’s second death. Indiana’s Catholic bishops cancel masses indefinitely. Gov. Holcomb activates the National Guard. Purdue, Butler and Indiana State universities cancel May commencement ceremonies.
  • March 18: Indiana had its fifth death. Eli Lilly and Co. says it will use its labs to speed up testing in Indiana. The 500 Festival announces suspends all events. Simon Property Group closes all malls and retail properties.
  • March 19: Gov. Holcomb extends Indiana’s state of emergency into May. Holcomb says he’ll close all K-12 public and nonpublic schools. Standardized testing was canceled. The state’s income-tax and corporate-tax payment deadline was extended to July 15. Holcomb says the state will waive job search requirements for people applying for Temporary Assistance to Needy Families. The IHSAA Boys Basketball State Tournament was canceled. The Marion County Emergency Operations Center upgrades to Level 1 status.
  • March 20: Indiana’s death toll rose to 9. ISDH announces Indiana’s third death. Gov. Holcomb moves the state’s primary election to June 2. Indiana University says it is postponing May commencement ceremonies on all campuses.
  • March 21: Indiana’s death toll rises to 14. ISDH announces Indiana’s fourth death. Indiana National Guard says it and the Department of Transportation are distributing medical supplies to hospitals.
  • March 22: Indiana’s death toll rises to 19. ISDH announces seven deaths.
  • March 23: Indiana’s death toll rises to 24. Holcomb orders Hoosiers deemed nonessential to “stay at home” from March 24-April 7. Eli Lilly & Co. begins drive-thru testing for the coronavirus for health care workers with a doctor’s order. Ball State University cancels the May commencement.
  • March 24: Indiana’s death toll rises to 29. Fred Payne of Indiana Workforce Development says any Hoosiers out of work, including temporary layoffs, are eligible to apply for unemployment benefits.
  • March 25: Indiana’s death toll rises to 35. Indianapolis Motor Speedway announces the Indianapolis 500 is moved to Aug. 23. IndyGo suspends fares and changes its ride schedules.
  • March 26: Indiana’s death toll rises to 44.
  • March 27: Indiana’s death toll rises to 47.
  • March 28: Indiana’s death toll rises to 58.
  • March 29: Indiana’s death toll rises to 76. President Donald Trump announces in a press conference that the national social distancing recommendation will be extended by 30 days.
  • March 30: Indiana’s death toll rises to 91. Indiana health commissioner Dr. Kristina Box predicts the arrival of the surge in cases and deaths could come in mid-April to late April, but could be as late as mid-May, “but we don’t know.”
  • March 31: Indiana’s death toll rises above 100, to 113. Gov. Holcomb extends the limits of bars and restaurants to offer only “to go” and “carryout” through April 6. Health commissioner Box, asked about when Indiana will be in a surge of COVID-19 cases, says she thinks the surge is starting.
  • April 1: Officials extend Marion County’s “stay at home” order through May 1. Marion County health officials say they will start COVID-19 testing services for front-line employees. Gov. Holcomb announces the #InThisTogether campaign.
  • April 2: The state announces K-12 schools will be closed for the rest of the school year. The Indiana High School Athletic Association cancels spring sports seasons.
  • April 3: Gov. Holcomb extends the “stay at home” order through April 20. The state receives a federal Major Disaster Declaration for all 92 counties. The Indiana National Guard says it, the Army Corps of Engineers and state health officials will begin to assess sites for alternate health care facilities.
  • April 4: Indiana’s death toll rises above 200.
  • April 6: The state reports a Madison County nursing home has had 11 deaths. Gov. Holcomb extends the “stay at home” order through April 20. He also limits additional businesses to carry-out only.
  • April 7: Indiana’s death toll rises above 300. Indiana health commissioner Box says four long-term care facilities have 22 deaths that appear to be related to COVID-19.
  • April 10: ISDH said 24 residents of a long-term care facility in Madison County have died from COVID-related illness.
  • April 11: Indiana’s death toll rises above 400.
  • April 14: Indiana’s death toll rises above 500.
  • April 16: Tests ID more than 10,000 Hoosiers with coronavirus. The governor says he expects Indiana to experience a reopening in early May.
  • April 17: Indiana’s death toll rises above 600. The governor says that he will extend the “stay at home” order through May 1.
  • April 20: Indiana’s death toll rises above 700. Gov. Holcomb extends the “stay at home” order to May 1. The governor also says, if the medical supply chain is in good shape, other elective medical procedures can resume April 27.
  • April 22: Indiana’s death toll rises above 800. The Tyson facility in Logansport voluntarily closes so 2,200 employees can be tested for COVID-19.
  • April 24: Indiana’s death toll rises above 900. The Indianapolis City-County Council approves $25 million to help small businesses. Fishers City Council creates a city health department with a plan to test every resident.
  • April 25: ISDH says it will launch an antibody testing study for Hoosiers; thousands of residents were randomly selected to participate in the study.
  • April 27: Indiana’s death toll rises above 1,000.
  • April 28: Indiana officials say they will open COVID-19 testing to more Hoosiers, with expanded criteria and new testing services at 20 sites around the state.
  • April 29: The state says it will spent $43 million on contact tracing.
  • April 30: Indianapolis extends its stay-at-home order through May 15.
  • May 1: Gov. Holcomb announces a phased reopening plan for the state of Indiana. He also extends the stay-at-home order to May 4.
  • May 3: Tests ID more than 20,000 Hoosiers with coronavirus.
  • May 4: Indiana enters Stage 2 of its Back on Track plan, which excludes Cass County until May 18, and Lake and Marion counties until May 11.
  • May 6:The state begins testing for all Hoosiers at 20 sites, with plans to expand the number of sites to 50 in a week. Ivy Tech Community College says it will continue virtual classes when summer courses begin in June. 
  • May 8: Cris Johnston, director of the Office of Budget and Management, says the state missed out on nearly $1 billion in anticipated April revenues; all state agencies will be given budget-cutting goals. Purdue University OKs plans to reopen for the fall semester with social distancing and other safety measures.
  • May 10: Indiana’s death toll rises above 1,500.
  • May 13: Indiana’s death toll rises above 1,600.The first phase of a state-sponsored study of the coronavirus estimated about 186,000 Hoosiers had COVID-19 or the antibodies for the novel virus by May 1. Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett announced plans for limited reopenings of worship services, retail establishments, libraries and restaurants.
  • May 16: Indiana’s death toll rises above 1,700.
  • May 17: Marion County’s death toll rises above 500.
  • May 18: Indiana reports its first case of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in a child. The Farbest Foods turkey-processing plant in Huntingburg is closed for three days; 91 people have tested positive there.
  • May 19: Indiana’s death toll rises above 1,800.
  • May 21: Tests ID more than 30,000 Hoosiers with coronavirus.
  • May 22: Indiana advances to Stage 3 of the Back on Track reopening plan. Indianapolis closes portions of five streets to allow restaurants to reopen with outdoor dining only.
  • May 23: Indiana’s death toll rises above 1,900.
  • May 27: The U.S. death toll rises above 100,000. Indiana University says the fall semester will have in-person and online courses, plus an adjusted calendar through May 2021. Ball State University says the fall semester will be 13 straight weeks of in-person classes with no day off on Labor Day and no fall break.
  • May 28: Indiana’s death toll rises above 2,000.
  • May 29: Places of worship in Marion County can begin holding indoor services at 50% capacity with proper social distancing. Jim Schellinger, Indiana secretary of commerce, said the federal Paycheck Protection Program has made 73,430 loans in Indiana totaling $9,379,164,461, the federal Economic Injury Disaster Loan program has made 5,070 loans in Indiana totaling $445,428,500, and the federal Economic Injury Disaster Loans Advance program has made 38,365 grants in Indiana totaling $136,554,000.
  • June 1: Marion County restaurants begins serving customers indoors and outdoors with 50% capacity. Marion County salons, tattoo parlors reopen by appointment only. Marion County gyms, fitness centers and pools reopen with 50% capacity and no contact sports. However, a Marion County curfew that began the night of May 31 and continued into the morning of June 3 after rioting impacted the reopening of some businesses.
  • June 3: Indiana’s death toll rises above 2,100. Phase 2 of statewide testing of random Hoosiers by the Indiana University Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI and the Indiana State Department of Health begins.
  • June 5: Indiana reports May tax revenues were 20% short of projections made before the coronavirus closings started.
  • June 8: Indiana’s death toll rises above 2,200. Indianapolis leaders agree to spend $79 million in coronavirus relief funding on contact tracing, rent relief, personal protective equipment and support for small businesses.
  • June 12: Indiana, excluding Marion County, advances to Stage 4 of reopening plan.
  • June 14: Indiana’s death toll rises above 2,300.
  • June 15: Casinos and parimutuel racing reopen in the state.
  • June 19: Marion County advances to Stage 4 of state’s reopening plan.
  • June 21: Indiana’s death toll rises above 2,400.
  • June 24: The governor says the state’s moratorium on the eviction on renters will be extended through July. Indiana announces it will create a rental assistance program July 13. Indiana Pacers guard Malcolm Brogdon says he has tested positive for COVID-19.
  • June 27: Indiana hospitalizations for COVID-19 begin to increase, with about 33 new patients a day through July 1.
  • July 1: The governor pauses Stage 5 final reopening plan, announces Stage 4.5 from July 4-17.
  • July 4: Indiana’s death toll rises above 2,500. Tests ID more than 48,000 Hoosiers with coronavirus. Stage 4.5 reopening plan begins.

The post Indiana schools could reopen with limited class time, 1-way hallways, plastic barriers appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana Traffic.


Tindley HS senior accepted by 65 colleges picks Howard University

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) -- Sixty-five: That's how many universities wanted to welcome Taran Richardson through their doors in the fall. Richardson, a senior at Charles A. Tindley Accelerated High School, will be taking his academic talents to Howard University in Washington to study astrophysics. He says that interest was sparked in him before he [...] The post Tindley HS senior accepted by 65 colleges picks Howard University appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana...

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — Sixty-five: That’s how many universities wanted to welcome Taran Richardson through their doors in the fall.

Richardson, a senior at Charles A. Tindley Accelerated High School, will be taking his academic talents to Howard University in Washington to study astrophysics. He says that interest was sparked in him before he even knew what college was.

“I was always that kid that enjoyed science,” Richardson said.

His desire to explore outer space was ignited while watching “Star Wars” movies, but his mother, Maurita Willingham, recognized his above-average smarts and was determined to make sure he achieved his full potential. Once she figured out what he could do in the classroom, she demanded his best and wanted it to reflect in his grades.

He took on that challenge and took his expectations up a notch.

“I was a four-sport athlete,” he said.

He competed in soccer, track, cross country and basketball. He was also involved in the National Honor Society and organized his own career fair to stop gun violence. He’s also an Eagle Scout, the highest ranking in the Boy Scouts of America.

“That’s the type of situation that I wanted myself to be in,” Richardson said. “I had so many options.”

“After a while, it was just mail coming in every week,” he said.

Ultimately the choice was the same school attached to his childhood dreams.

“I asked him, ‘What is it about Howard?'” his mother recalled.

His answer was NASA: Howard presented Richardson with the opportunity to be close to NASA’s headquarters and the hope of creating his own major science and technology business. Then he wants to bring that success back to Indianapolis and create opportunities for people in his hometown.

Richardson’s desire to come back and give to his community is his way of showing appreciation to his high school and the city that raised him.

“The saying says it takes a village to raise a child, but with all the support that we had, we didn’t have a village — we had a community,” Richardson said.

The post Tindley HS senior accepted by 65 colleges picks Howard University appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana Traffic.


Motorcycle shop’s ‘artist’ severely injured in fireworks accident

Ethan Porter-Stiles is expected to be out the hospital later this week. The post Motorcycle shop’s ‘artist’ severely injured in fireworks accident appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana Traffic.

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — He’s 34 years old, and his friends said he was in surgery Sunday night to repair his right hand, damaged during a fireworks celebration Saturday.

Minutes after the explosion, many of Ethan Porter-Stiles’ friends thought his hand was gone. The red lighter he’d used disintegrated in his hand.

On Saturday night, Porter-Stiles and some friends were in the backyard celebrating the Fourth of July with fireworks.

Around 9:15 p.m., Indianapolis firefighters were fueling up one of their engines near 5800 Southeastern Avenue on the southeast side when they heard a loud explosion. Minutes later, they were flagged down and told a man had suffered a serious injury. Authorities soon found Porter-Stiles. Indianapolis Fire Department reported he’d been holding a mortar shell.

Barb Jankowski lives next door and said the explosion that caught her attention.

“Some of my neighbors down the street said their house rattled and then you hear a blood-curding scream,” Jankowski said. “It was a very horrific sight seeing him laying on a stretcher with his right hand blackened and bloody.”

Porter-Stiles and his buddies had been using a tree truck in the backyard as a launching pad for their fireworks.

On Monday, the remnants of Saturday night’s activities remained: unexploded bottle rockets and firecrackers.

Jankowski said, “It was a bunch of guys just setting off some big loud boomers, and they did something foolish.”

Porter-Stiles uses his hands to make a living as the owner of Porterbilt Fabrications, a motorcycle repair shop. His customers have been calling the shop all day to ask for updates on his condition.

Jankowski called him “an artist” at his work.

“But, you know, the next two years are going to be rough, you know, especially for some body that is an artist and works with their hands, and now that hand is bandaged and pinned,” Jankowski said.

Porter-Stiles is expected to be out the hospital later this week.

His injury was one of several on Saturday during fireworks celebrations, Indianapolis Fire Department reported.

The post Motorcycle shop’s ‘artist’ severely injured in fireworks accident appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana Traffic.


Woman shot, killed near downtown canal was mother with ‘great heart’

Anyone with information can reach out to the homicide office of Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department at 317-327-3475 or leave a tip anonymously with Crime Stoppers of Central Indiana at 317-262-8477. The post Woman shot, killed near downtown canal was mother with ‘great heart’ appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana...

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — The woman who was shot and killed near the Central Canal downtown over the weekend was a devoted mother in the nursing field.

Her name was Jessica Whitaker. She was 24 years old.

Friends and former coworkers on Monday told News 8 that Whitaker had a “great heart” and cared about other people. They also described her as fun, loving and kindhearted.

It seems fitting that she was in the nursing field and worked as a certified nursing assistant.

But, they said, her young son was her pride and joy.

Police got the call just before 3:30 a.m. Sunday of a person shot. Officers found Whitaker and rushed her to the hospital in critical condition. She died at the hospital a few hours later.

Samantha Pauli lives in the Gardens of Canal Court, which overlooks the canal near Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and West St. Clair streets.

She said a friend heard what they thought was a loud firework on Sunday morning, only later to realize it may have been a gunshot.

She woke up Sunday morning to see the crime scene tape on the canal. It wasn’t until later in the day she found out a woman had been shot and killed.

She said it doesn’t really change her behavior.

But ,she adds, even with the recent shootings, it doesn’t really change her behavior because as the sun goes down, she stays inside.

“Not really, it doesn’t really,” Pauli said. “I’m going to stay positive going forward because things can happen. I know six days ago a kid got shot robbing a woman, so I know that happened. I just know not to go out at night. I’m not going to go out at night at all.”

News 8 reached out again to police Monday. They’re not releasing any additional information including details like what may have led up to the shooting or a possible motive.

Anyone with information can reach out to the homicide office of Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department at 317-327-3475 or leave a tip anonymously with Crime Stoppers of Central Indiana at 317-262-8477.

The post Woman shot, killed near downtown canal was mother with ‘great heart’ appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana Traffic.


Speedway murder suspect arrested in California

SPEEDWAY, Ind. (WISH) -- The suspect in a Speedway murder has been arrested in California, investigators say. The Speedway Police Department says 20-year-old Ruben Gonzalez Magallanes has been arrested for the June 20 murder of Jayshawn Walker. Police say Magallanes was arrested Monday in San Bernardino, California. On the evening of June 20, officers were [...] The post Speedway murder suspect arrested in California appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana...

SPEEDWAY, Ind. (WISH) — The suspect in a Speedway murder has been arrested in California, investigators say.

The Speedway Police Department says 20-year-old Ruben Gonzalez Magallanes has been arrested for the June 20 murder of Jayshawn Walker.

Police say Magallanes was arrested Monday in San Bernardino, California.

On the evening of June 20, officers were called to the 2200 block of Sumter St. where they arrived to find Walker. He was pronounced dead on the scene.

Police believe Walker was targeted and that this was not a random act.

If you have any information in the case, call Crime Stoppers at 317-262-TIPS (8477).

The post Speedway murder suspect arrested in California appeared first on WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather | Indiana Traffic.


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