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Manitoba is a Canadian prairie province. The province, with an area of 649,950 square kilometres, has a largely continental climate, with thousands of lakes and many rivers.


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Winnipeggers brave extreme cold for Women’s March

Winnipeggers braved the extreme cold to take part in the third Women’s March Winnipeg, Saturday at the Manitoba Legislative Building. Despite wind chill values near -40, about 150 people showed up for the event which featured a number of speakers and a short march around the grounds of the Legislative Building. The Winnipeg march was...

Winnipeggers braved the extreme cold to take part in the third Women’s March Winnipeg, Saturday at the Manitoba Legislative Building.

Despite wind chill values near -40, about 150 people showed up for the event which featured a number of speakers and a short march around the grounds of the Legislative Building. The Winnipeg march was among 33 being held across Canada, according to the organizing website, and more around the world.

“It’s going to be freezing but women’s rights are important and so we show up anyway,” said organizer Hailie Harrison, prior to the start of the march. “There are women who are dealing with all sorts of things. We can deal with the cold.”

The marches began in 2017 when an estimated three million to five million people joined the largest one-day protest in U.S. history after the inauguration of President Donald Trump. The Women’s March on Washington was the main event, but sister protests around the world attracted an estimated six million people that year in support of women’s rights and freedoms. In Winnipeg, the 2017 march attracted thousands of Winnipeggers to parade through the downtown.

“I hope people see that there is an interest here, that women are willing to stand up for women’s liberation, that there is a group of people in Winnipeg who are dedicated to equality and I hope that that galvanizes people to work together or to work on their own towards some kind of change,” said Harrison. “The march doesn’t address any single issue. It’s not going to fix any single thing. What it does is it creates a place for people to come together and amplify all of the issues that women are still facing today.”

“I hope it brings solidarity. I hope women feel comfortable to share their stories,” added Samantha Rayburn-Trubyk, president of Little People of Manitoba and one of the speakers at the march. “I hope we bring this great togetherness that we can really change the world together if we all support each other and we all come together we can do amazing things.”

Saturday’s march included support from the Bear Clan Patrol.

Women’s March Winnipeg took place in Winnipeg Saturday. It was an extremely cold day. Winnipeg Sun/Chris Procaylo

In the two years since the first march, issues such as sexual harassment and gender equality have gained a public forum in part due to the subsequent rise of the #MeToo movement. But Harrison and Rayburn-Trubyk agreed that challenges remain to be overcome.

“I think we’re talking about it more,” said Rayburn-Trubyk, who shared publicly for the first time her own story of sexual abuse when she was four during her speech. “I think it’s good change has come in terms of we’re talking about it and we’re more aware of it. We’re making significant changes, people are more comfortable speaking about it. I think there’s a long way to go.

“This is a start and this is great. (But) It’s 2019 and we should be the most enlightened generation. We have the technology, we have the tools, we have the information. We need to make the changes.”

Women’s March Winnipeg took place in Winnipeg Saturday. It was an extremely cold day. Winnipeg Sun/Chris Procaylo

Marchers carried signs expressing personal views such as “My feminism is weather-proof” and “I am girl, hear me roar.” Bundled up in the cold, at least one marcher used the occasion to make a political statement.

“I’m very unhappy that Brian Pallister and his caucus would not pass (NDP MLA) Nahanni Fontaine’s bill to protect women at the doors of abortion clinics,” said Claudia, carrying a sign reading ‘It’s cold but we’re still here. Feminists for Revolution’. “We need a buffer zone so that we do not feel intimidated and harassed.”

Fontaine has introduced a private member’s bill in November proposing a ban on protesters within up to 150 metres of facilities where abortions take place.

gdawkins@postmedia.com

Twitter: @SunGlenDawkins

 

 

 


Jets and Stars both hoping to go out on high note before bye week

DALLAS — It’s the last game before an extended break for the Winnipeg Jets and Dallas Stars and both teams have every intention of going out on a high note even though they’ve been going in different directions of late. The Jets have won four straight games and want to keep the hot streak going...

DALLAS — It’s the last game before an extended break for the Winnipeg Jets and Dallas Stars and both teams have every intention of going out on a high note even though they’ve been going in different directions of late.

The Jets have won four straight games and want to keep the hot streak going into the break, while the Stars have lost four in a row and desperately want something positive to happen before they hit the bye.

That should make for a high-intensity matchup at American Airlines Arena on Saturday night.

“Just stay on the roll, ride this momentum,” Jets centre Andrew Copp said. “One more game and leave it all out there and ride the momentum that we’ve created for ourselves over the last seven or eight games.”

The first-place Jets have been at their best this week, earning wins over the Vegas Golden Knights and Nashville Predators and they don’t want to stumble against a Dallas team that has been through all kinds of turmoil this season and is in danger of falling out of a playoff spot.

“We want to keep trying to separate ourselves from the pack and keep pushing ourselves in the right direction and get as close to a perfect game as we can,” Copp said.

The Stars have 50 points, 14 less than the Jets, and are on the playoff bubble. Their newest acquisition, winger Andrew Cogliano, said they need to throw everything they have at the Jets in their last game before the break to bust out of their funk.

“It adds some more intensity for you,” said Cogliano, who was traded from Anaheim last Monday, a day after scoring for the Ducks against the Jets. “You know at the end of the day you’re going to have a break so there’s no excuses. Everyone wants to feel good going into the break, everyone wants to feel good about his game and you want to leave it all out there.

“The break’s probably coming at a good time for our team but you want to go all-out on a win, that’s the most important thing. Of course, they’re playing the game too and they’re saying the same thing.”

The Jets have built a nice cushion for themselves atop the Central Division, leading second-place Nashville by four points, with two games in hand.

You could argue this is not a good time for them to take a full week off.

“You’re always looking forward to it during the year but at this time you maybe wish it wasn’t starting tomorrow,” Copp said. “It’s out of our control now so you just gear up for one more and then you have a nice little rest on the other side of it. “

Three members of the Jets will take part in the all-star festivities next weekend in San Jose — centre Mark Scheifele, right-winger Blake Wheeler, and coach Paul Maurice.

The Jets will not practice again until next Sunday (Jan. 27) in Philadelphia and their schedule resumes with games against the Flyers Monday, Jan. 28 and Boston Bruins on Tuesday, Jan. 29.

Maurice doesn’t think the Jets will have any trouble keeping their focus for this game, even though their minds might wander to the week ahead at times.

“One of the advantages about our guest trip, the fathers’ trip, going into that break is you know the players are going to be focused because they want to put a good show on for the dads and the guests,” Maurice said. “That’s a positive for us.”

The Jets are 1-1 against the Stars this season, with each team winning in its own building. The Stars will have a bit of a different looking lineup for this one as coach Jim Montgomery has split up the top line of Tyler Seguin between Alex Radulov and Jamie Benn.

Benn will now play with Radek Faksa and Blake Comeau while Mattias Janmark takes his place on the left-wing with Seguin and Radulov.

“They’ll move players around,” Maurice said. “They’re trying to develop some checking forwards here to play against your top end, so shift lengths are real critical in that, face-offs are a really important part of it in this game tonight.”

The Jets will have the same lineup they had in Thursday’s 5-1 win in Nashville. Connor Hellebuyck starts in goal again, while Ben Bishop, who has been the Stars best player this year and has outstanding numbers, will start for Dallas.

“Every time we play (the Jets) it seems like they get better,” Cogliano said. “They’re a team that’s tough to handle. They play four lines, they have good defencemen, they have a good goalie and they make you earn it.”

That sounds like exactly the blue-print the Jets have wanted all season long. Lately, they’ve been drawing it up to a T.

“I think we’re in a really good position,” Scheifele said. “The last little while we’ve really started to find our game a little more. Coming out of Christmas we weren’t really playing Winnipeg Jets hockey that we know how to play, but as of late we’ve picked it up. We’ve been playing that full 60 minutes of good hockey and that’s what we need.

So does the break help or hurt a rolling hockey club?

“The break’s great for us,” Scheifele said. “Resting the body is a big part of it, everyone needs it. A break in the season is always time well needed.”

Twyman@postmedia.com

Here’s a look at the lineups for tonight’s game for both teams:

Winnipeg Jets

Forwards

Kyle Connor-Mark Scheifele-Blake Wheeler

Patrik Laine-Bryan Little-Jack Roslovic

Mathieu Perreault-Adam Lowry-Brandon Tanev

Brendan Lemieux-Andrew Copp-Mason Appleton

Defence

Josh Morrissey-Jacob Trouba

Dmitry Kulikov-Tyler Myers

Joe Morrow-Sami Niku

Goalies

Connor Hellebuyck

Laurent Brossoit

Dallas Stars

Forwards

Mattias Janmark-Tyler Seguin-Alexander Radulov

Jamie Benn-Radek Faksa-Blake Comeau

Andrew Cogliano-Jason Dickinson-Jason Spezza

Denis Gurianov-Roope Hintz-Brett Ritchie

Defence

Esa Lindell-John Klingberg

Miro Heiskanen-Roman Polak

Connor Carrick-Taylor Fedun

Goalies

Ben Bishop

Anton Khudobin


GUEST COLUMN: Canada’s most vulnerable children deserve far better

Canada continues to fall behind other developed countries when it comes to child well-being.

National Child Day, which commemorates the adoption of the United Nations Conventions on the Rights of the Child, has come and gone for another year, but Canada cannot celebrate much progress.

Yes, the federal government has established a Poverty Reduction Strategy; there is a Youth Council to advise the prime minister; and they have plans to establish an Accessible Canada Act. These are all important steps toward improving the well-being of kids and their families.

But Canada continues to fall behind other developed countries when it comes to child well-being.

Canada ranked 25th out of 41 peer countries on UNICEF’s 2017 Index of Child and Youth Well-being and Sustainability. A recent national study from Children First Canada also reports that suicide is the second leading cause of death among Canadian children. Mental-health related hospitalization rates are increasing and approximately one in five Canadian kids continue to live in poverty.

The reality is more bleak when you consider First Nations children.

One in three Indigenous children live in poverty. This number rises to over 60% among children living on reserve. First Nations youth have suicide rates five to seven times higher than non-Indigenous youth – and Inuit youth have one of the highest rates in the world, 11 times higher than the national average.

We must do better.

At a recent cross-partisan open caucus meeting in the Canadian Senate, experts from across the country addressed the issue of child well-being in Canada. As the caucus heard, Canada still has much to do.

Sen. Jane Cordy is from Nova Scotia. She is vice-chair of the Human Rights Committee and is also a member of the Energy Committee and the Foreign Affairs and International Trade Committee in the Senate.

Canada is not living up to its obligations under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. The convention seeks to ensure children’s right to survival, protection from harm, neglect and exploitation, and the right to develop to their fullest potential, participating in family, cultural and social life.

Jordan’s Principle, which passed unanimously in the House of Commons in 2007 and which seeks to ensure First Nations children receive equitable access to all government services and support, remains unenforced.

Andrea Auger, a member of the Pays Plat First Nation in Ontario, working for the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society, told the forum that the “federal government has a long-standing pattern of discrimination against First Nations children.

Indeed, there have already been five non-compliance orders from the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal against the federal government for failing to implement Jordan’s Principle.

The bottom line: First Nations children are still being denied the same funding for health and social services, and education as their non-Indigenous counterparts.

This is unacceptable.

“We need to ensure substantive equality,” said Auger, reminding the caucus that child welfare was the number one call to action in the Truth and Reconciliation report.

How can we change the trajectory for Canada’s most vulnerable youth?

Sen. Raymonde Gagné is from Manitoba. She is a member of the Official Languages Committee, Transport and Communications Committee and Agriculture and Forestry Committee in the Senate.

Canada must fully implement Jordan’s Principle. First Nations children deserve robust services and supports, equal to those of their non-Indigenous counterparts.

The government must also appoint a federal commissioner for children and youth. As Stephanie Mitton from Children First Canada told the forum, a commissioner would hold our governments accountable. Sixty other countries have a children’s commissioner in place and as Pamela Lovelace from Wisdom2Action noted, there’s ample evidence that such a position improves child welfare.

Finally, we must urgently develop a national youth suicide prevention strategy and fund mental health services across the country, particularly for Indigenous youth.

Lovelace noted Quebec’s recent highly successful campaign to prevent youth suicide. But as Dr. Amy Metcalfe, an assistant professor at the University of Calgary told the forum, suicide prevention doesn’t just happen in the hospital and in health-care organizations; it must be implemented and supported community-wide.

Quality data is key to implementing effective policies. As Lovelace reminded the caucus, “We don’t even know how many kids there are in care across the country.” Kathy Vandergrift, chair of the Canadian Coalition for the Rights of Children, said: “I can get better data on the state of cows in this country than on our children.”

That’s clearly unacceptable.

Investing in kids is about investing in our future. It’s time for all levels of government to work together and put the welfare – and the rights – of Canadian children at the forefront.

Sen. Jane Cordy is from Nova Scotia. She is vice-chair of the Human Rights Committee and is also a member of the Energy Committee and the Foreign Affairs and International Trade Committee in the Senate. Sen. Raymonde Gagné is from Manitoba. She is a member of the Official Languages Committee, Transport and Communications Committee and Agriculture and Forestry Committee in the Senate. 


Two men found guilty of manslaughter in shooting death of Jeanenne Fontaine

A jury has found two men guilty of manslaughter in the high-profile shooting death of a Winnipeg woman inside a home that was then set on fire. Christopher Brass and Jason Meilleur were charged after Jeanenne Fontaine was killed in March 2017. She was the cousin of Tina Fontaine, a teenager whose body was found...

A jury has found two men guilty of manslaughter in the high-profile shooting death of a Winnipeg woman inside a home that was then set on fire.

Christopher Brass and Jason Meilleur were charged after Jeanenne Fontaine was killed in March 2017.

She was the cousin of Tina Fontaine, a teenager whose body was found three years earlier in the Red River, and whose death fuelled calls for a national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women.

Another man, Malcolm Mitchell, pleaded guilty to shooting Fontaine last month and was sentenced to life in prison for second-degree murder.

The Crown had argued that Brass and Meilleur should be convicted of manslaughter because they went to the home with Mitchell and were planning to rob Fontaine and her boyfriend when the shooting happened.

The Crown said the three went to collect on a drug debt — about $90 worth of methamphetamine — and Brass and Meilleur should have known the situation would turn violent because Mitchell was armed with both a gun and a knife.

Defence lawyers did not present evidence during the trial, but said during closing arguments that the Crown had failed to prove that a robbery was being committed. A cellphone and other valuables were left untouched.

They also pointed to witness testimony that Mitchell was alone with Fontaine in a bedroom when he shot her. Brass and Meilleur were elsewhere in the house. Mitchell then started the fire.

The killing was the latest in a series of hardships for the Fontaine family.

A relative testified Jeanenne, who was 29, only started taking meth after her cousin Tina’s body was pulled from the Red River in 2014.

The 15-year-old’s body had been wrapped in a duvet cover and weighed down with rocks. The man accused in her death, Raymond Cormier, was acquitted last year.

Tina Fontaine had also spiralled downward after a family tragedy. Her father, Eugene Fontaine, was beaten to death in 2011. Two men pleaded guilty to manslaughter.

Victim impact statements at their trial noted that Tina had a happy childhood but was unable to cope with her father’s death, got into trouble, and drifted away from the people closest to her.


Alberta woman wanted on animal cruelty charges arrested in Manitoba

CALGARY — Manitoba RCMP have arrested an Alberta woman who is at the centre of an animal cruelty investigation. April Irving was charged in 2015 with animal cruelty and neglect after 201 emaciated dogs were seized from a property near Milk River in southern Alberta. Irving was charged after five dogs were found that had...

CALGARY — Manitoba RCMP have arrested an Alberta woman who is at the centre of an animal cruelty investigation.

April Irving was charged in 2015 with animal cruelty and neglect after 201 emaciated dogs were seized from a property near Milk River in southern Alberta.

Irving was charged after five dogs were found that had starved to death.

She missed a 2016 court date and officials suspected she had moved to Jamaica.

Mounties say Irving was arrested by members of the Stonewall RCMP detachment.

RCMP are working to have her transferred back to Alberta.


No winning ticket for Friday night’s $10M Lotto Max jackpot no Manitoba prize winners

TORONTO — No winning ticket was sold for the $10 million jackpot in Friday night’s Lotto Max draw. A ticket sold in British Columbia matched six iof the seven numbers plus the bonus to claim $309, 346. There were no Manitoba major prize winners. The jackpot for the next Lotto Max draw on Jan. 25...

TORONTO — No winning ticket was sold for the $10 million jackpot in Friday night’s Lotto Max draw.

A ticket sold in British Columbia matched six iof the seven numbers plus the bonus to claim $309, 346.

There were no Manitoba major prize winners.

The jackpot for the next Lotto Max draw on Jan. 25 will be approximately $17 million.


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