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  • Andrew McLean
  • October 26, 2019 12:49:26 PM
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A Little About Us

Collar and Harness is a collection of the best dog products and doggy lifestyle guides by people who love dogs for people who love dogs. We are a small team of independent reviewers, some of us who work with dogs on a daily basis.

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    Best Harness for Labradors – Our Top 7 for 2020

    Looking for the best dog harness for a Labrador Retriever? Check out our review guide including types, sizing and training ideas for your Lab. The post Best Harness for Labradors – Our Top 7 for 2020 appeared first on Collar and Harness...

    With their boundless energy and enthusiasm, the loveable Labrador Retriever can be a handful at first. Walking them on a collar and leash can be frustrating, particularly if they pull a lot. A good alternative is a dog harness. After much research, our experts have chosen the Ruffwear All-Day Dog Front Range Harness as the best harness for Labradors. It is a superb and reliable no-pull harness that is excellent for both walking and training.


    Our Top Pick

    A good choice for both adult and puppy Labs, the Ruffwear is a front and back clip walking harness which can work wonders on dog’s who have a tendency to pull. It has excellent reviews and has remained a popular choice with many owners of most breeds.

    Labrador Retrievers, also called Labradors or Labs, are the most popular dog breeds in the United Kingdom, the United States and Canada.

    Obedience, playfulness and loyalty are all attributes associated with Labs. They are used regularly for disability assistance as well as therapy, detection and law enforcement purposes.

    Famous fictional Labs include Brian Griffin from Family Guy, Pharaoh, Isis, and Tiaa in Downton Abbey and Krypto, Supermans faithful pup. Both US President Bill Clinton and Russian President Vladimir Putin have been Labrador owners.

    Labrador owners choose a dog harness over walking them on just a dog collar and a leash for various reasons.

    Firstly they are more comfortable and can reduce pressure on your dog’s neck and throat, especially if they pull. They help with training your dog to walk without pulling. They are comfortable, durable and long-lasting.

    This article will look at our top seven harnesses for a Labrador Retriever and will discuss the harness types, sizes, measurement, and what to look for when choosing your harness.

    Best Harness for Labradors – Our Top 7 Reviewed

    1. 🏆 Ruffwear All-Day Dog Front Range Harness

    RUFFWEAR - Front Range, Everyday No Pull Dog Harness with Front Clip, Trail Running, Walking, Hiking, All-Day Wear, Twilight Gray (2017), Large/X-Large A classic dog harness and a Collar & Harness favourite. Arguably one of the best no-pull harness for Labradors, the Ruffwear is packed with both features and functional design.

    The Ruffwear harness has an aluminium V-ring at the back for normal walking. Simply attach a leash and away you go. There’s also a reinforced webbing loop at the front (chest) of the harness.

    Using a double-ended leash such as the Halti training lead will let you attach to both points when needed. This gives increased control of your Lab and helps train them to reduce their pulling behaviour.

    Even walking with just the back clip will help reduce pulling behaviour. The padded harness distributes the force across your dog’s chest and body, taking force from the neck and throat when they lunge or pull.

    There are reflective stripes on the outer layer for improved visibility and it can be hand-washed as well as being fairly water-resistant.

    Overall, this is a well constructed, sturdy and useful Labrador dog harness that can be used for both normal walking and to alleviate pulling behaviour.

    Suggested Labrador Size: Large –  Suggested Labrador Puppy (6 months) Size: Medium

    2. Julius-K9, 16IDC-B-2, IDC Powerharness

    Julius-K9, 16IDC-B-2, IDC Powerharness, dog harness, Size: 2, Blue A strong, long-lasting back clip dog harness, the Julius-K9 is a powerful beast for your powerful beast. The distinctive Police Dog style harness has a durable waterproof outer layer with a scratch-resistant material with reflective trims at the chest and sides.

    The soft inner layer uses an OEKO-TEX breathable skin-friendly material.

    The Julius-K9 is an easy harness to put on a Lab. There’s a large, heavy-duty, plastic buckle around the belly area.

    Leads are attached to the top with a metal ring. There is also a closable handle at the top for holding your dog in place.

    These harnesses are a great choice for larger dogs, they are very strong and excellent for controlling your Lab when they get overly excited in the park.

    Suggested Labrador Size: Size 2  –   Suggested Labrador Puppy Size: Size 1

    3. Rabbitgoo Dog Harness

    Rabbitgoo Dog Harness No-Pull Pet Harness Adjustable Outdoor Pet Vest 3M Reflective Oxford Material Vest for Dogs Easy Control for Small Medium Large Dogs (Black, L) Another hugely popular no-pull dog harness, the Rabbitgoo is well designed and comfortable made from high-quality materials.

    The harness uses breathable nylon with mesh outer lining and soft padding in the inner layer for comfort.

    There are two adjustable side straps. One strap located on the neck and the other on the front. As a no-pull harness, it has both a front (chest area) and back (top of the harness) leash attachment clip.

    Rabbitgoo harnesses are easy to put on and off with a quick-release buckle.

    Available in seven different colours, this harness also includes reflective trims for increased visibility at night.

    If you are looking for an inexpensive, comfortable and popular no-pull harness – the Rabbitgoo is one worth checking out.

    4. Eagloo No Pull Dog Harness [UK]

    Another front and back clip dog harness often used by Labrador owners is the Eagloo. With four adjustment points on the neck and chest, this is a comfortable and well-fitting dog harness.

    Made with nylon material, the harness has reflective trims on the outer layer for increased night visibility. There is a handle at the back for better control of your dog. The manufacturer does mention using that handle for securing your dog in a car – however, we recommend you do research on securing your dog before doing this.

    The inner layer of the Eagloo is padded for comfort. Overall it’s a reasonably priced harness, with positive reviews and some good features.

     

    No Pull Dog Harness Large Black, Front Clip Vest Harness Dog Car Harnesses with Handle Puppy Chest Padded Adjustable Reflective Breathable Mesh Lightweight Easy Control for Outdoor Walking

    5. Rabbitgoo Tactical Dog Harness [USA]

    Available from: Amazon.com

    rabbitgoo Tactical Dog Harness Vest Large with Handle, Military Dog Harness Working Dog Vest with MOLLE & Loop Panels, No-Pull Adjustable Training Vest with Metal Buckles & Leash Clips for Walking Tactical Molle Vest Harnesses are designed for professional working dogs as well as hunting and outdoor treks.

    This heavy-duty, military standard, vest is made from 1050D Nylon material with sturdy stitching.

    It is made to be escape-proof and the craftsmanship shows the effort that has been put into making this as strong as possible.

    On the shoulder are two metal buckles designed for pulling force. There are also two metal leash attachment points for safer walking.

    The inner layer is cushioned and distributes weight and pressure evenly across your Labradors upper body. There are five adjustable straps to give your dog an ideal fit.

    In addition, the harness has a handle at the top for better control of your labrador as well as assisting in lifting them when needed.

    6. LIFEPUL No Pull Dog Vest Harness

    Possibly not the most attractive harnesses, but ideal for those on a budget or trying a harness for the first time.

    The leash attaches to a metal D-Ring at the back (top) which also includes a handle for holding your Lab in place if needed.

    Breathable, padded and with a stitched nylon outer layer – it’s not a bad harness. I’m not overly fond of the design, finding it a little bulky looking – but will probably suit many owners just fine.

    Lifepul No Pull Dog Vest Harness - Dog Body Padded Vest - Comfort Control for Large Dogs in Training Walking - No More Pulling, Tugging or Choking

    7. Winsee No Pull Dog Harness [USA]

    This very affordable Labrador Retriever harness isn’t the most long-lasting out there – but if you’re on a budget it includes both a harness and matching dog collar.

    Similar in style to the Rabbitgoo – the Winsee is both a walking and a front range harness. There are D-Ring’s at the back and chest of the harness to switch between a single or double-ended leash.

    The harness itself is made from a 1680D oxford fabric with high density that prevents your Lab from easily chewing or tearing it.

    WINSEE Dog Harness No Pull, Pet Harnesses with Dog Collar, Adjustable Reflective Oxford Outdoor Vest, Front/Back Leash Clips for Small, Medium, Large, Extra Large Dogs, Easy Control Handle for Walking

    Collar or a Harness for a Labrador

    Labradors have a lot of energy and require much exercise as a result. Many Labrador owners at first default to giving their Lab a dog collar and walking them that way.

    After a few weeks of frustration from being dragged around on the street with constant pulling, some consider an alternative to their collars and decide on a dog harness.

    Pulling in Labradors is not uncommon and something seasoned Lab owners will be familiar with. For first time owners, however, it can be not only frustrating but challenging. It can not only cause discomfort for you, particularly your hands but can lead to discomfort and stress for your dog.

    A well-designed harness can do wonders for a dog’s pulling behaviour when combined with good training and plenty of patience. They will also distribute force across the dog’s chest – leading to a more comfortable and safer walk.

    Regardless, if your dog is a puller or not – we suggest using a collar solely for ID tags to help identify them should they get lost.

    Types of Lab Harnesses

    There are several types of harness out there, which can be a little daunting at first. Here’s a quick guide to the varieties available.

    Labrador Vest Harness

    Simple, inexpensive and used as a basic walking harness. Often made from plastic, mesh or nylon – they are designed for lightweight general wear and for dogs who are already well behaved on their leash.

    They tend to go over the dog’s head and clip under the dog’s front legs.

    Front and Back Clip No Pull Dog Harness

    Perhaps the most common harness types you’ll see – they will be either:

    • Back Clip
    • Front Clip
    • Front and Back Clip Harness

    Many harnesses are either front/back clipped and designed to reduce pulling behaviour in dogs. Back clip dog harnesses have a lead attachment point at the back. A standard leash can be clipped on for normal walking.

    Front clip harnesses, such as the SENSE-ation, have an attachment point solely at the front of the chest area. These are very different than your traditional harnesses in that the lead only attaches to the front – which may seem odd at first – however, they can often be recommended by trainers as an easier way to reduce pulling.

    They’re fairly specialist and can restrict shoulder movements in some breeds – but worth looking into if a back-clip harness isn’t working for your Lab.

    Front and Back clip harnesses have points at both the top (back) and include a secondary attachment point at the front (chest) of the harness. This front attachment point requires a special training leash, like a HALTI, that is double-ended.

    One point attaches to the back, the other to the front. This offers increased control of your dog, similar to the reins used on a horse.

    A no-pull harness is made to reduce the impact of the dog pulling on their lead, as well as aid in the training of your dog.

    Tightening and Control Harness

    There are more aggressive than standard anti-pulling harnesses, and tighten when your dog starts pulling. These can be uncomfortable as they can squeeze the dogs chest as they tighten. These harness types are best reserved for experienced dog handlers and trainers.

    Tactical Dog Harnesses

    These tend to be used on larger breeds such as Labradors and German Shepherds. Although often associated with Military and Service dogs, they are also to be found as training harnesses, hunting harnesses or general trekking.

    Labrador Harness Size and Measurements

    Standard adult labrador sizes vary, but according to the American Kennel Club, an average male labrador height is between 22.5 to 24.5 inches (57 to 62 cm) with females measuring 21.5 to 23.5 inches (55 to 60 cm).

    This places Labs in the category of a medium-large breed, with harness sizes reflecting that. Normally this will be a large-sized harness, though it will vary depending on the manufacturer.

    You’ll need a smaller size for a labrador puppy, often a medium, which will need replacing once they grow out of it.

    To get an accurate measurement for your Labrador and Lab puppy, follow the steps below. If you find that your measurements land between two different harness sizes, it’s recommended to go for the larger of the two and use the adjustable straps for a better fit.

    Measure The Chest

    The most crucial part of your measurement is the chest. Take a tape measure and wrap it around the widest part of the chest. This is found a few inches behind the front legs.

    Add a Few Inches

    You should all a couple of inches to the total to allow for movement and growth.

    Measure the Neck

    This may not be a requirement however if the harness goes over the Lab’s neck – it’s a good idea to check. Take the tape measure and measure around the circumference of the neck.

    What Makes a Good Labrador Dog Harness

    Finding the right dog harness can take not only time and effort but patience from you, the owner. Training is important – a harness by itself will not make all the difference in the dog’s walking habits.

    Be careful not to select a harness that is likely to fall apart, snap or break when put under strain. Check that the harness fits well and allows for movement.

    Summary

    We hope you found our article on the best harnesses for Labradors helpful in making your choice. Dog harnesses are a good alternative to walking your dog on a collar and lead. They are comfortable and secure without putting pressure on your dog’s neck.

    Harnesses are also great if your dog is a puller. They can also be used for training your dog to stop them from tugging on their leash when walking them.

    When selecting a harness it’s important that you find the right one for your Lab’s temperament. You should also find a harness that fits the size of your breed, as too loose opens them up to escape and too tight can leave them uncomfortable.

    Don’t forget to share your harness experiences in our comment section below and join the conversation on our Facebook page.

    The post Best Harness for Labradors – Our Top 7 for 2020 appeared first on Collar and Harness Magazine.


    9 Dapper French Bulldog Shirts – The Best Frenchie Styles

    Check out our stylish collection of nine dapper shirts for your French Bulldog. Give your Frenchie the best look for any occasion. The post 9 Dapper French Bulldog Shirts – The Best Frenchie Styles appeared first on Collar and Harness...

    No French Bulldog wardrobe is complete without a collection of stylish shirts. Some discernable Frenchie owners are always on the lookout for the latest styles.

    But in order for your French Bulldog to look the part, you need to consider the time of year and the event. So whether it’s a summer walk in the park or fine dining in the autumn, there’s a shirt for every occasion.

    Owners have flocked to Instagram and Pinterest to show off their dogs latest threads. There are even fashion shows just for dogs.

    Frenchie polo shirts, dress shirts, Hawaiian shirts – they’re all here in our French Bulldog shirt top nine collection.

    Best French Bulldog Shirts – Our Top Nine

    1. All-Match Frenchie Polo Shirt

    All-Match Frenchie Polo Shirt

    Available from:

    Frenchie N Pug

    This French Bulldog polo shirt won’t look out of place at any social gatherings.

    2. Meioro French Bulldog Dress Shirt Tuxedo [UK]

    Meioro Pet Clothes Dog Shirt Dog Tuxedo Bow Tie Shirt Suitable for Wedding Party Puppy French Bulldog Pug (L, Bow tie shirt)

    Available from:

    Amazon.co.uk

    French Bulldog meets James Bond.

    It doesn’t get more stylish than a Tuxedo, and this pinstripe waistcoat and shirt number is as classy as it gets. Even at a state dinner, your Frenchie will outshine the competition.

    The shirt is made from a soft fabric with a bow-tie at the front and back. The material is not stretchable – so check the sizing before ordering and remember to add a couple of extra inches so it doesn’t get stuffy.

    3. Spring Polo Shirt

    Spring Polo Shirt

    Available from:

    Frenchie N Pug

    This bright and colourful Frenchie polo shirt is just the thing for summer nights.

    4. Hot Springs Hawaii Style Shirt

    Hot Springs Hawaii Style Shirt

    Available from:

    Frenchie N Pug Amazon.com

    Looking like they’re straight off the movie set – and Frenchie will look the part in this stylish Hawaiian style shirt.

    This French Bulldog button up shirt is made from natural cotton and linen fabric. The buttons are a nice touch and amplify the dapper look.

    5. The Preppy Frenchie Cotton Shirt

    The Preppy Frenchie Cotton Shirt 

    Available from:

    Frenchie N Pug

    Tennis Club? Cricket Pavillion? No problem.

    6. The Bachelor – Summer Shirt

    The Bachelor - Summer Shirt

    Available from:

    Frenchie N Pug

    Available in blue or white, this is an amazing buttoned dress shirt which gives both style and airyness to your French bulldog.

    7. iChoue Sleeveless Dog Shirt

    iChoue Dogs Clothes Vest T-Shirts for French Bulldog Pug Boston Terrier Frenchie Cute - Stripes of Green and Black-M

    Available from:

    Amazon.com

    Eleven different colour variations of this snug sleeveless shirt are available but the green and black striped edition was our favourite. The clothing is made from 100% non-iron knit cotton. It’s elasticated and incredible flexible.

    8. Frenchie’s The Word – iChoue Dog Shirt and Sweater

    iChoue Pet Dog Knitted Sweater Collar Knitwear Winter Warm Clothes Cold Weather Coat for French Bulldog Frenchie Shiba Inu Corduroyt-Dark Green/M

    Available from:

    Amazon.com

    An adult or a puppy Frenchie will look all grown up in this classic outfit. Worthy of a birthday party, this knitted cotton combined shirt and sweater is both smart and cozy.

    9. The Classic – Black & White Striped Shirt for Frenchies

    Frenchie Pet Clothing Classic Elegant Black White Stripe for French Bulldog or Pug Wear Use Comfortable Fabric

    Available from:

    Amazon.com

    It’s not hard to love the classic look – and fashion doesn’t get more classic than black and white. Made from a stetchable fabric – this slim fit shirt is designed for a snug and comfortable feel.

    About French Bulldog Clothes

    Although putting clothes on your French Bulldog may seem the height of fashion – it’s not for everyone and should be done in moderation.

    An important thing to keep in mind, when putting clothing on your Frenchie, is their body temperature. Frenchies can easily overheat, so keep the clothing to a minimum in warm weather and indoor areas.

    Never leave your dog wearing clothing for long periods of time. This is particularly important if you plan on leaving them unattended for any period of time.

    If your Frenchie shows signs of overheating, be sure to contact your veterinary professional as soon as possible.

    The other thing to note is that not all dogs will be comfortable wearing clothes straight away. Clothing is not exactly natural to dogs, so while puppies might accept it quickly, adult dogs might need a bit of help.

    We suggest you introduce clothing slowly to your French Bulldog. Prepare some tasty treats and present the item of clothing to your dog.

    Treat them each time they show interest in the item. Once they are comfortable approaching the item, start by placing the item gently against their body and treating immediately after.

    Repeat this until you can see your dog being happy and looking for the treats as soon as the item touches them.

    You should add a few more steps to the process. Place the item on their back then treat them, and repeat multiple times. Pretend to put the item on them, but don’t pull it over their head, then after a while, pull it over their head, but not all the way, and so on.

    The process will be very quick for confident dogs, but it might take a bit of time for anxious dogs, or dogs who have a problem with things going over their head. Either way, this will ensure that your dog not only is okay with wearing clothes but also enjoys the whole experience.

    A final note on shirts. Unlike some clothing items for dogs, shirts rarely have gaps in the back for a harness. If your Frenchie wears a walking harness, you’re best placing the shirt beneath the harness. Also remember, this will make them quite warm wearing double layers – so not ideal for warmer weather.

    Measuring Your Frenchie for a Shirt

    If you don’t want your Frenchie to stick out like a sore thumb, you’ll want to make sure the clothing fits properly. It’s not just the fashionable thing to do, it is also safer that way.

    Clothing which is too loose is a trip hazard and it will quickly get damaged. On the other hand, if the clothes are too tight, they can be uncomfortable, cause skin irritations or even breathing problems. Yes, chafing is a very real problem for dogs too!

    Remember that as a brachycephalic breed, it doesn’t take much to cause problems for your Frenchie’s airways. It’s crucial we avoid clothing which might get too tight around the neck.

    You don’t have to immediately dismiss that adorable turtleneck you’ve been eyeing up! You just need to test it before putting it on your dog and ensure it doesn’t affect their breathing in any way.

    Most dog clothing brands seem to have their own sizings, so you can’t rely purely on the tags. Read the description carefully and keep your dog’s measurements handy when buying clothes.

    You need to measure your dog’s neck, chest, and body length. A tape measure will be your friend for this.

    Take the tape and measure around the thickest part of the neck, if there is one, otherwise anywhere will do. We know that French Bulldogs usually have a short and stocky neck, but each dog is different, so best to be sure you didn’t measure the thinnest part of the neck.

    For the chest, again you need to measure around the widest part of the chest. Most likely to be a few inches away from the front legs.

    Finally, measure the body length. This is done from the end of the neck to the base of the tail. If you’re buying something like a raincoat, you want to make sure it covers your dog entirely, not just the neck and shoulders area.

    Once you have the measurements, check them against instructions on items you are considering to buy or sizing charts online. When you find yourself between sizes, it is safer to pick the larger option.

    Summary

    We hope you enjoyed our collection of French Bulldog shirts. Choosing stylish clothing can give your Frenchie a great look. Remember not to leave any clothing on all the time, however, and be vigilant for excessive panting and overheating.

    If you’re looking for something a bit warmer, check out our hoodies article in our dog apparel section.

    Share your own Frenchie shirts in the comments section below or by visiting our Facebook page.

    The post 9 Dapper French Bulldog Shirts – The Best Frenchie Styles appeared first on Collar and Harness Magazine.


    Best Dog Crates for Labradors [Incl. Car, Travel, Sizes & Training]

    Looking for the best dog crate for your Labrador? Read our Lab crate guide with sizing, types and puppy training tips. The post Best Dog Crates for Labradors [Incl. Car, Travel, Sizes & Training] appeared first on Collar and Harness Magazine.

    Looking for the best dog crate for your Labrador? We researched a number of dog crates and concluded the  MidWest iCrate Starter Kit was best for USA and Canadan readers and the Ellie-Bo 42″ Crate for our UK readers.

    Labrador Retrievers, more commonly known as Labradors or Labs, is a medium-large breed and the most popular dog breed in the USA, UK and Canada.

    As a breed, Labradors generally have a friendly, active and outgoing temperament. They are also full of energy, needing lots of exercising.

    Giving your Labrador their own space in your home can be beneficial for both you and your dog. If they have their own space, like a child has a bedroom, they have a safe, comfortable place to spend some alone time and sleep.

    This article will discuss the best dog crates for Labs, why you would choose a crate, consider what size cage for Labradors works best and will cover crate training a labrador puppy (or adult).

    Best Dog Crates for Labradors

    1. 🏆 MidWest iCrate Starter Kit [USA and Canada]

    This complete set contains everything you need to start your dog crate journey. The kit includes a 42″ double-door dog crate, crate cover, fleece dog bed and two Snap’y Fit dog bowls which can be affixed to the inside of the crate.

    iCrate Dog Crate Starter Kit, 42-Inch Dog Crate Kit Ideal for LARGE DOG BREEDS Weighing 71 - 90 Pounds, Includes Dog Crate, Pet Bed, 2 Dog Bowls & Dog Crate Cover, 1-YEAR MIDWEST QUALITY GUARANTEE

    2. Ellie-Bo 42″ Crate [UK]

    This folding 42-inch two-door dog crate is a great choice for a Labrador. It’s foldable and can be taken down and stored away with ease.

    Ellie-Bo Dog Puppy Cage XLarge 42 inch Black Folding 2 Door Crate with Non-Chew Metal Tray

    3. AmazonBasics Dog Crate – 42″

    The AmazonBasics crate is great value and available as a single or double-door dog crate. It includes dividers for making the crate smaller when your Lab is a puppy and expanding out to full size as they grow.

    AmazonBasics Double-Door Folding Metal Dog Crate Cage - 42 x 28 x 30 Inches

    4. Veehoo Folding Soft Dog Crate, 3-Door Pet Kennel

    The first of our soft crate options. As with all soft crates – these are best suited to dogs who are already crate trained (and house trained).

    At 40″ it’s slightly smaller than the wire crates – but it should still have plenty of room for your Labrador. The crate has three roll-up doors at the top, front and left-hand side which can be closed with a zipper. This makes ventilation superb and is very friendly for day and night usage.

    The internal layer is a solid steel frame with a washable fleece pad for laying on.

    Veehoo Folding Soft Dog Crate, 3-Door Pet Kennel for Crate-Training Dogs, 5 x Heavy-Weight Mesh Screen, 600D Cationic Oxford Fabric, Indoor & Outdoor Use, 40", Beige Coffee

    5. AmazonBasics Folding Soft Dog Crate for Crate-Trained Dogs

    Preview Product Rating
    AmazonBasics Folding Soft Dog Crate, 42' AmazonBasics Folding Soft Dog Crate, 42" No ratings yet

    Our second soft crate is not quite as fancy as the Veehoo however it is slightly larger and still incredibly comfortable.

    AmazonBasics Portable Folding Soft Dog Travel Crate Kennel - 31 x 31 x 42 Inches, Tan

    6. New World Folding Metal Dog Crate [USA]

    Preview Product Rating
    New World Folding Metal Dog Crate New World Folding Metal Dog Crate No ratings yet

    7. MidWest Life Stages 42″ Folding Metal Dog Crate [USA and Canada]

    If you’re looking for the iCrate without all the extra bits – you can get this great MidWest crate which includes a divider to adjust sizing as your lab grows.

    Large Dog Crate | MidWest ICrate Double Door Folding Metal Dog Crate|Large Dog, Black

    Travel Crates for Labradors

    In addition to the two soft crates, these are some of the best selling large dog crates available.

    8. BIRDROCK HOME Soft-Sided Dog Crate [USA]

    A hugely popular travel crate for our USA readers – this can be collapsed down into a handy strapped carry case when not in use.

    Internet's Best Soft Sided Dog Crate - Large (32 Inches) - Mesh Kennel - Indoor Outdoor Pet Home - Travel Easy - Folding and Collapsible Cage - Blue

    9. Mool Lightweight Fabric Pet Carrier Crate [UK]

    Mool Lightweight Fabric Pet Carrier Crate with Fleece Mat and Food Bag - Large (70 x 52 x 52 cm), Black

    10. SportPet Designs Plastic Kennel [USA]

    A more traditional plastic dog crate – this is also IATA Airline Approved for flying. It’s incredibly strong and well ventilated with wheels that can be snapped on or off when needed. The plastic travel crate also includes tie-down holes for bungees – a requirement from airlines.

    As with any air travel crate – check any special specifications required by the airline and that you have all the correct documentation before flying.

    SportPet Designs Plastic Kennels Rolling Plastic Wire Door Travel Dog Crate- XLarge

    Why Choose a Labrador Crate

    There can be many reasons people choose a dog crate for their labrador. Primarily they’re looking to create a den or space in their home where their dog can go and get some privacy. Sometimes this will double as the Labs sleeping space.

    Crates can also be used for short term confinement, transporting a dog or on the orders from a vet (for example, when recovering from injury).

    Choosing the Right Crate for your Labrador

    When choosing your Lab’s crate – your end goal is to pick something spacious enough that your dog will have a friendly and safe environment to hang out and snooze in.

    A dog crate is not a punishment. It should not be a place to send your puppy or adult when they’ve been naughty. Nor should it be a place they’re locked in all day. Doing this is not only unfair to your Labrador but will also result in a negative association with crates.

    Obviously, for a larger breed like a Labrador or Golden Retriever, you need to make sure the crate is big enough to stretch out and you have space available in your home. We will cover sizings later in the article.

    Unless your dog is already crate (and toilet) trained, you will probably want to pick a wire crate. These are generally escape-proof and very secure.

    Wire dog crates are also very easy to clean, which can be important if your lab is still a puppy.

    Overall, you’re looking to create a friendly, comfortable environment with a dog bed or pillows and even their favourite toy to keep them company.

    Types of Labrador Crates

    When searching for dog crates you will find a number of different type of crates out there. Each has a particular purpose and is designed differently as a result.

    The main style of crate you will encounter is the Wire Dog Crate. Usually, these are large rectangular cages with metal or steel wire bars on all sides. Also called cages or indoor kennels, these are very robust and practically escape-proof.

    AmazonBasics Double-Door Folding Metal Dog Crate Cage - 42 x 28 x 30 Inches Wire crates can come with either one or two doors (often at the front and side). Double-door crates are a lot easier for training and daytime use – but it’s often dependent on the amount of room in your home.

    A good crate will also have double slide locks on each door – at the top and bottom of the right-hand side. This prevents your pup from putting too much pressure on the door (if it only had a lock in the middle) and escaping.

    The metal from these crates is also chew-proof, which can be hugely beneficial over a softer crate.

    These crates are usually collapsible, so can be folded down and stored away when needed. They also tend to come with dividers for making the crate smaller when your Lab is a puppy then expanding to full size as they grow.

    If your Labrador is crate trained and you fancy something a little less cage-like – there are Fabric / Soft Crates. Made from fabric they are not only soft but lightweight. We’ve owned a few of these in the past and used them as both house and travel crates when on holiday.

    Mesh is usually used for the door – which makes it very breathable but not great for a chewer.

    Travel Crates are either fabric crates or are made of plastic. They are generally smaller and used for short term transport or storage. Heavy Duty Dog Crates are designed for dogs who particularly are prone to escaping and finally, Car Crates are for keeping your dog safe when in the car.

    What Size Crate for a Labrador?

    Before you buy a crate for your Labrador you will want to make sure you choose a cage that is not too small or too large. A small crate will be cramped and a large crate may be intimidating. Your Lab needs something they can easily get into, stand up, lie down and stretch out without feeling restricted.

    Although a 36-inch crate is usually fine for a smaller Labrador, we’ve found that most adult Labradors will find a 42-inch crate to be comfortable and is our recommended size.

    This will give your lab plenty of space to spread out and move around.

    dog, labrador, canine If you’re looking for a crate size for a labrador puppy you may be tempted to go for a smaller size. Many people do this and then buy a new one once their lab puppy outgrows it.

    However, this can be problematic as you’ll need to dispose of the old one and, more importantly, your lab may have become quite attached to their den.

    An alternative is to buy an adult dog crate with dividers. Dividers are designed to adjust the crate size by making it smaller at the beginning. You can then gradually extend the size of the crate up to full size once your dog is fully grown.

    If you are keen to determine your labrador’s size to match it against the manufacturer’s guidelines you can do this with a tape measure. Most crate sizings are given in inches, but you may find a few in centimetres.

    • Step 1: measure the height by having your Lab sit in an upright position. Measure from the ground to the top of the head
    • Step 2: measure the length by having your Labrador stand. Measure from the tip of the nose to the base of the tail.
    • Add 4-6 inches to your total – this gives some extra room for movement and stretching out.

    Should you find that your dog’s measurements are between crate sizes – you should go for the larger of the two where possible.

    When considering size, also think about the size available in your home. Not only will you need space for the crate, but also enough room for your Lab to easily get in and out of the crate.

    Car Dog Crates for Labradors

    If you want to go on a road trip, there’s no need to leave Fido at home. You do need to make sure you keep your dog safe though, for their own sake and to avoid breaking any laws or your car insurance clauses.

    There are multiple ways to secure your dog in the car, and you can use just one of them or multiple options at the same time. In the UK, for example, the law says that dogs (pets) must not be able to disturb the driver at any point, it doesn’t specify the way you have to achieve this.

    The most common way to respect the law is by installing a dog guard behind the front seats, or in the boot of the car. You must ensure the dog guard is the correct size and there aren’t any gaps through which your dog could get through.

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    RAC Advanced Mesh Dog Guard RAC Advanced Mesh Dog Guard 59 Reviews

    Another option is a seat belt, but you have to make sure a correct harness is used with those. Your usual walking harness may not be suitable, and a simple collar is definitely not the right choice.

    Keep in mind that crash testing dog harnesses have only started fairly recently and many of the tested harnesses are pretty expensive.

    Dog Car Barriers for SUV - Adjustable Dog Gate for Car SUV or Other Vehicle, The Perfect Dog Dividers for SUV Adventurers Car crates are also fairly common, often referred to as boxes due to some of them not being of the wire kind. Suitability of these will depend on the size of your vehicle and your dog. The crate should be large enough for your dog to stand up and turn around in.

    While they might be the better option for large dogs, there might not be enough room in your car to accommodate a box for dogs larger than a Labrador.

    If you’re thinking of using a crate in your car, be sure to complete some crate training first. If your dog is not familiar with a crate, or worse if your dog is scared of the crate, you might create more problems than you’re solving.

    Wire crates in the car are perfectly fine as they will provide enough restraint and comfort for your dog but do consider an aluminium box as well. They tend to be more expensive, but they are more durable and will prevent your dog’s legs getting stuck anywhere.

    Hardcastle Folding Metal Car Boot Pet Dog Cage These aren’t the only ways to secure your dog, though we don’t feel some other options should only be done in addition to one of the above three.

    Zipline harnesses allow your dog to move around while still having a seatbelt. The zipline can go around the back seats, or on the roof of the car. While technically restrained, your dog has a lot of freedom, so it’s probably best used in conjunction with a dog guard.

    Items such as hammocks and booster seats (or carry boxes) and even fabric crates are really more useful to protect your car’s upholstery than to protect your dog. Hammocks are really useful, but again combine it with one of the above methods. It’s certainly unlikely to be in line with the law.

    Booster seats are quite useful, and depending on which one you find, they might be just what you need for your dog. We don’t recommend them for large dogs, but for tiny and small dogs, it can offer all the support and restrain they need, provided you attach their harness to the seat or a seatbelt.

    Labrador Retriever Crate Training Tips

    If you want to ensure your Labrador is relaxed and ready to utilize the crate, you should do some preparation. It may appear as though it’s a truly long procedure, but with our guide, you ought to gain a great deal of ground pretty fast.

    These are our Labrador crate training tips.

    If your Lab is just a pup, you might find this all really easy and get through the steps quickly. It’s not a given though, be sure to keep your pup’s body language in mind and to go at their speed.

    puppy, labrador, purebred For adult Labradors things can be quite different, some will be perfectly comfortable with the training if they’ve never encountered a crate before.

    Some, unfortunately, might have had a bad experience with a crate in the past or they might simply be a bit anxious in general, so you might need to repeat some steps more often or add a bit of extra time to your training goal.

    The main focus of our training is to always associate the crate with something good. Do not use the crate as a punishment, as all you’ll end up with, is a damaged relationship with your dog.

    We wouldn’t suggest playing or using energizing toys, as you may end up with an agitated pooch sitting frustrated in the crate when you need them to be relaxed and content.

    Start by just sitting before the crate and hurling a treat inside. Your pooch will probably follow the treat inside to eat it. On the off chance that they don’t follow the treat, place the treat close to the crate but not inside it, and play some games like that until your pup shows a more relaxed state around the crate.

    young, labrador, puppy When your pooch is inside the crate don’t go rushing to shut them in, just let them come out in the event that they wish to do so. Keep that crate door open for quite some time still.

    Keep doing this until you notice your Labrador beginning to stay inside the crate for a few seconds longer each time, hanging tight for the following treat. When they start doing this you can reward them while inside the treat, then move onto the next step.

    You should move to the side of the box now, pop the treat inside the crate through the bars for your pooch to enjoy. Play around with putting the treats in such a way that might encourage them to lie down.

    As strange as it might sound, lying down does encourage a more relaxed state. What you need here is your Labrador resting in the crate, doing nothing or just collecting treats from the floor.

    You may need to do a touch of luring to accomplish that, which is fine, just don’t begin requesting things from your dog, or shutting the crate door right now.

    At the point when your Labrador is happy to get in the crate, lie down and patiently wait for the next set of goodies you can progress to the next step of introducing movement.

    From your place to the side of the crate, shuffle along an inch or two, then come back to your position and treat. Make different small movements and always treat when you retreat back to your original position. This teaches your pup that whatever you’re doing, you will be back, they’re not left alone for good.

    In the event that your puppy exists the crate at any point, don’t respond to it, simply utilize the past steps to get them back in the crate and in the ideal position. No force should be included. In the event that you get frustrated or unsure what went wrong, take a break and get back to it later. Go back a step or two and try when you’re feeling more at ease with the training.

    Mix up your movements to include things like getting up and possibly even leaving the room. You should end up with the ability to walk out for two or three minutes without your little guy wanting to shadow you.

    It will probably require a great deal of repeating little movements to get to that stage. Make certain to change up the amount of movement, otherwise, you risk being too predictable. Predictable is bad because you can’t be sure you’ll be out of the house for the exact same amount of time whenever you head out.

    labrador, dog, animal At last, if your little guy is glad to remain inside the box when you leave the room, despite the fact that the crate is open, you can return to step 1 and start over, however, this time you can close the door once your pooch is inside the crate. It may appear to be monotonous, but careful practice brings about promising results.

    Indeed, it is still not the time to lock the crate doors. Don’t be deflated by that, if it makes you feel better, having a dog who can stay in an open crate is far more useful than one who can stay in a locked crate.

    After all, anyone can shove a dog in a crate, lock the door and pretend they’ve done something. A good pet owner will invest the time to make their dog see the crate as a safe and happy place.

    You need to carefully watch your dog’s body language and be able to open the crate if they show signs of wanting to come out. This teaches them that you’re there for them and being in a crate does not mean permanent abandonment and restraint.

    At long last, celebrate the little triumphs. On the off chance that your little furball makes more progress than you anticipated, compensate them with a treat bonanza inside the crate. You can also feed their suppers in the crate, which will further increase their love for the crate.

    Once you’ve done all the exercises, you can repeat them with a locked crate. What you’ll find is that your pup is perfectly happy and relaxed. It will likely be a fairly quick exercise, but it’s a sort of final test to make sure their body language hasn’t changed. Some dogs can get scared of the locking sound or other noises in the process, so it’s best not to skip this, just in case.

    Last but not least, treat yourself to a cuppa or a nice glass of wine!

    General Crate Hints and Tips

    • Make sure your dog crate is well ventilated with good airflow. However, also ensure the crate is not too drafty, right by a heater/radiator or in direct sunlight.
    • Pad your crate out with blankets, cushions or a dog bed. By itself, a crate isn’t a comfy environment.
    • Beware of separation anxiety when you leave the room. If your dog begins crying when you’re not around – you should consider some additional training.
    • Crate covers or blankets can be used to give your dog more privacy.

    Summary

    We hope you find our article on the best dog crates for a labrador useful in making your choice. Remember to find a crate which is big enough for the breed and work with your Lab to make the crate a positive place to be.

    Check out our other crate guides and articles in our Crates section. Don’t forget to leave a comment below or join us on our Facebook page.

    The post Best Dog Crates for Labradors [Incl. Car, Travel, Sizes & Training] appeared first on Collar and Harness Magazine.


    7 Best Dog Crates for French Bulldogs [Sizes & Training for 2020]

    Complete article on the best dog crates for a French Bulldog. Includes crate sizes, training advice, reviews and tips. The post 7 Best Dog Crates for French Bulldogs [Sizes & Training for 2020] appeared first on Collar and Harness Magazine.

    Whilst researching and reviewing the best crate for French Bulldogs, we found the  MidWest iCrate Starter Kit was best for USA and Canada readers and the Cozy Pet 30″ Dog Crate for our UK readers were clear favourites.

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    USA and Canada:

    A complete starter kit for your Frenchie including a two-door metal wire crate, fleece padding, crate divider, plastic pan, polyester crate cover and two dogs bowls for attaching to the kennel.

    UK: 

    A very well constructed double-door dog crate which includes dual slide locks on each door. It’s a lot more heavy-duty than many crates and should last a lifetime. It’s also very reasonably priced.

    French Bulldogs, or Frenchies, were originally bred from English toy bulldogs and French ratters. In the past decade, they have become one of the most popular dog breeds in the UK, USA and Australia.

    Frenchies are an adorable small-medium sized breed and known for their friendliness, sociability and playful ways.

    Owners also love to pamper their French Bulldogs, from designer collars to the latest apparels out there.

    In the home, they like nothing more than a cuddle. But what about at night time? Do they sleep on the bed, their own dog bed or in a crate?

    A dog crate, sometimes called an indoor kennel or cage, can be a good place for your French Bulldog to relax and sleep in.

    This article will review our seven best dog crates for a French Bulldog. We will discuss what to look for in a crate, the types available, which size suits a Frenchie best and give some hints and tips on training.

    Best Dog Crates for French Bulldogs – Our Top Seven

    1. 🏆 MidWest iCrate Dog Crate Starter Kit [USA and Canada]

    iCrate Dog Crate Starter Kit, 30-Inch Dog Crate Kit Ideal for MEDIUM DOG BREEDS Weighing 26 - 40 Pounds, Includes Dog Crate, Pet Bed, 2 Dog Bowls & Dog Crate Cover, 1-YEAR MIDWEST QUALITY GUARANTEE A fantastic complete set for our USA and Canada readers is the MidWest iCrate starter kit. The base crate is a 30″ two-door black metal dog crate.

    The cage is very secure, chew-proof and sturdy with a lock on each door. It has dividers so you can make the crate initially smaller when your dog is still a puppy and extend out to full size as they grow.

    There is a removable plastic panel at the bottom which can be cleaned, a handle at the top for lifting and, best of all, can be collapsed down flat should you need to store it.

    Included with this crate are a machine washable fleece bed, a polyester crate cover and two Snap’y Fit dog bowls which can be attached to the inside of the cage.

    This is an exceptionally good value for money crate that will do well for most French Bulldog’s whether they’re a puppy or an adult.

    2. 🏆 Cozy Pet 30″ Dog Crate [UK]

    For our UK readers (well, on the most part – sadly they don’t deliver to Northern Ireland – but fear not – check out #3 on the list).

    This is an exceptionally well constructed and heavy duty French Bulldog crate. Very well priced, the two-door design includes a double slide lock for additional security.

    It’s a foldable crate and can be packed away and stored with ease. The panel at the bottom is a metal tray, one of the most robust we have seen.

    Cozy Pet Dog Cage 30" Black Metal Tray Folding Puppy Crate Cat Carrier Dog Crate DC30B. (We do not ship to Northern Ireland, Scottish Highlands & Islands, Channel Islands, IOM or IOW.)

    3. AmazonBasics Double-Door Folding Metal Dog Crate

    This hugely popular no-frills metal dog crate is simple but effective. Available as a single or double-door option, it’s a great environment for creating your new French Bulldog bedroom.

    There is a divider panel included meaning you can make the crate a smaller size when they are a young puppy and expand it out to full-sized as they grow.

    AmazonBasics Double-Door Folding Metal Dog Crate Cage - 30 x 19 x 21 Inches

    4. Ellie-Bo Medium Dog Crate [UK]

    A two-door dog crate available in a choice of colours (black, silver, gold). Two metal sliding latches for security and a removable metal tray which can be cleaned with ease.

    Ellie-Bo Dog Puppy Cage Medium 30 inch Black Folding 2 Door Cage with Non-Chew Metal Tray

    5. Veehoo Folding Soft Dog Crate

    Veehoo Folding Soft Dog Crate, 3-Door Pet Kennel for Crate-Training Dogs, 5 x Heavy-Weight Mesh Screen, 600D Cationic Oxford Fabric, Indoor & Outdoor Use, 32", Gray Our first soft dog crates on our list – and definitely one of our favourites. It’s a very lightweight crate with three roll-up mesh doors located at the top, front and on the left of the crate.

    The five-sided mesh exterior at each side is a super light honeycomb for better ventilation. Doors are secured using a zipper.

    The inner part is made from a collapsable solid-steel frame which can be flattened down and stored if required.

    As with all soft crates, this isn’t the fortress you’d find with a wire crate. It’s made for dogs already crate and toilet trained.

    Note, Veehoo does not have a 30-inch crate option, just 28″ or 32″ – we’d go with the larger of the two available.

    6. AmazonBasics Folding Soft Dog Crate, 30″

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    AmazonBasics Folding Soft Dog Crate, 30' AmazonBasics Folding Soft Dog Crate, 30" No ratings yet

    Not quite as fancy as #5 but still a great soft crate option for your Frenchie.

    AmazonBasics Portable Folding Soft Dog Travel Crate Kennel - 21 x 21 x 30 Inches, Tan

    7. MidWest Homes for Pets Dog Crate [USA]

    This is the same as the iCrate Starter Kit without all the extras. If you’re just looking for the crate itself this offering comes in a choice of single or double doors. It also has a dual slide lock for extra security.

    Medium Dog Crate | MidWest Life Stages 30" Double Door Folding Metal Dog Crate | Divider Panel, Floor Protecting Feet & Dog Tray | 31.375L x 22.5W x 23.5H Inches, Medium Dog Breed

    Why Choose a French Bulldog Crate

    There are a number of reasons why you would purchase a dog crate for your French Bulldog. These include:

    • A safe open “den” that your dog can go to whenever they want
    • A place they can sleep at night which is there own
    • Short term confinement where they can be kept when needed
    • On Vets orders – e.g. to aid recovery after operation or industry
    • Transporting your dog from one place to another

    Choosing the Right Crate for your French Bulldog

    When choosing a dog crate, your end goal is to create a safe and friendly environment that your dog will enjoy going in when they want space or a snooze.

    It is not a place to be sent for bad behaviour. Using a crate as a form of punishment will result in it being seen in a negative light and not used as intended.

    Though crates have many uses, if you are planning on using it as a place for sleeping overnight – you should consider a few things.

    Where your Frenchie sleeps is usually down to the preference of the owner. Though they can sleep with you on a bed at night, you may regret this habit after a few months of broken sleep. From personal experience, it’s far harder to break this habit than people realise.

    Some people prefer crates as it creates a clear division between sleeping locations.

    You should consider the size of the crate when choosing this option and where in your household you plan to put it.

    Many people opt for the bedroom. If this is your preference, make sure it is in a spot that will not only fit the crate but is easy for your dog to get in and out of. The area should be well ventilated, but not drafty or in direct sunlight.

    The crate will require some bedding to make it more homely for your Frenchie – and you’ll need to invest time in training for best results. We will cover these points later in the article.

    Types of French Bulldog Crates

    The most common types of crates you’ll find are wire crates. These are often rectangular with metal bar frames on all sides.

    AmazonBasics Double-Door Folding Metal Dog Crate Cage - 30 x 19 x 21 Inches Wire crates often come with two options – single or double door. A double door crate is always better as it gives choice as to how your dog enters the crate and may make training a little easier.

    However, if you have a limited amount of floor space you may opt for a single.

    They are often foldable meaning you can fold them away flat when needed.

    This is good for storing the crate away, particularly if you’re only using it for the short term or for moving the crate to another part of your home. Getting a fully built crate through a door will be a challenge I wouldn’t recommend trying.

    AmazonBasics Double-Door Folding Metal Dog Crate Cage - 30 x 19 x 21 Inches Wire crates are very strong and should stay firm against chewers and escape artists. Doors usually come with two slide locks, one at the top and another at the bottom. This stops a determined dog or puppy from squeezing through the weak points.

    Finally, the wire crates also tend to come with a metal or plastic floor panel. This can be easily removed and cleaned if needed.

    Next up we have Soft Crates. These crates are designed for dogs who are already crate trained (and toilet trained) as they would be easier to chew your way to freedom.

    Soft crates are much more lightweight than their wired crate counterparts, thus making them excellent as indoor or travel crates.

    The inner frame can be made from metal, PVC or plastic. Fabric often covers the rest of the crate. There can be anything between two to five doors on these crates – usually made from mesh netting with a zipper.

    These are a lot cosier, softer and lighter than normal crates – and great for a French Bulldog who is already used to being inside a crate.

    Travel crates are often a lot smaller, usually plastic crates, used for transporting pets. You’ve probably seen these being used in vets offices, but can be used for transporting a dog anywhere – especially if mobility is a problem.

    These are very much designed for short term travel – so should not be used in your home as a permanent solution as your dog will find them too cramped.

    Finally, car crates are used in cars for transporting your dog about. These can be standard crates or specialised crates designed to fit in with the shape of the car. There are a few options for safely driving with your dog including frames and dog seat belts – so best to do some research.

    What Size Crate for a French Bulldog?

    Although you can choose a smaller crate for a French Bulldog puppy, it is recommended to get a 30-inch sized dog crate for your Frenchie. A crate needs to have enough size for your dog to stand up in as well as stretch out.

    You can measure your dog using a tape measure by doing the following (in inches):

    • Height: Measure from the ground to the head whilst your dog is sitting upright
    • Width: Measure from the nose to the base of the tail whilst your dog is standing up

    You should then add a few extra inches to the final numbers – roughly 4 inches to the height and 6 inches to the width. Some crates also have weight recommendations – so it may be worth getting their weight next time you visit the vet.

    If your measurements are between two different French Bulldog crate sizes – it is advised you pick the larger of the two. A crate which is too small will be cramped and you may land up having to buy a larger size eventually.

    Though you can get a smaller crate for a French Bulldog puppy, you will eventually have to replace it when they are fully grown. To save the fuss and additional training, some dog crates come with dividers. These can be used to make the crate smaller, then extended to full size as your dog grows.

    When considering size, you may also want to consider the space the crate will go. If you have a large home with lots of spare space – this is less of a problem. However, if you live in a smaller space or apartment, you should consider the best place to store it before you buy.

    Your dog must be able to get in and out of their crate with ease. The space available will also determine whether a single or double door crate is best.

    dog, dogs, French bulldog

    French Bulldog Crate Training Tips

    The lovely bundles of joys that are French Bulldogs will need some training in order to become comfortable using a crate. Like all dogs, each Frenchie is different and the time it takes to crate train them will vary from bulldog to bulldog.

    Puppies and adults who have not had contact with crates in the past are likely to pick it up quickly. Training a French Bulldog will be the slowest for those who have had interactions with a crate in the past, but it didn’t end well. Don’t be disheartened though, you can still crate train them, you just need a bit of extra patience and some TLC.

    Regardless of the stage of life, you first need to pair the crate with good things, i.e. tasty treats. Make sure they’re of high value to your dog.

    Sit on the floor in front of the open crate (keep the crate opened for quite some time still) and toss the treat inside.

    Your Frenchie should follow the treat inside and possibly come back out straight away. If they don’t, try putting the treat just outside of the crate and then move the next treat closer, and so on until you can do the toss game.

    Repeat the toss game until your dog looks like they’re waiting for the next treat without coming out of the crate.

    Move from the front of the crate to the closed side of the crate and repeat the above exercise. This time toss the treats through the wire bars and see if you can spread them out in a fashion which would encourage your pup to lie down and eat or expect the treats.

    French Bulldog Crate Training

    Don’t tell them to lie down, but luring is fine. Reinforce lying down heavily as this is an important step.

    When your Frenchie is clear on the idea that walking into the crate means lying down, you can add a bit of movement.

    Start small, move along the floor a couple of inches and come back to the original spot then treat. If your pup comes out of the crate, go back a step and do a bit more reinforcement on the previous lying down. At the same time reduce the movement to maybe just extending your arm, then tossing it a treat.

    Movement should eventually graduate to something like walking out of the room for a minute or two and coming back, with your Frenchie still lying down in the crate. To achieve this you need to vary the movements you use, but also don’t introduce too much difficulty too soon.

    Once you’re able to walk out of the room without being followed, you can go back to step one again and start over. This time, however, you can close that crate door without worrying too much. Your pup should be comfortable enough in the crate to accept the crate door being closed. Don’t lock the door for now.

    If your Frenchie shows signs of unease or desire to come out of the crate, swing that door open and let them get out if they want. This prevents them from going into panic mode and further reinforces the idea that crates are safe and you have their back at all times.

    Finally, once you’ve done all the steps with the door closed and you’re confident that your pup is happy and relaxed inside the crate, you can start locking the door.

    It would be best to start with step one again and do the exercises all over but with the doors locked this time. Your pup might be perfectly fine without that though, so go with what they are telling you.

    If you’re at all concerned, you can always go back a couple of steps and work a bit longer on associating the crate with good stuff.

    Just remember, this little bit of hard work will pay off for many years to come. What’s better than being able to get out of the house, knowing full well that your dog is perfectly happy and relaxed at home?

    french bulldog, dog, pet

    General Crate Hints and Tips

    • Be mindful of placing your dog crate in a drafty part of the room. Like humans, your dog will get cold – especially if staying there at night. The same applies if you leave them too near to a radiator or direct sunlight.
    • Access to water is always a good idea. This is less of a problem if your crate door is open and they can gain access to a water bowl. Alternatively, there are water bowls which can be clipped onto the inside of the crate.
    • It’s a good idea to place your dogs favourite toy or something like a Kong Cone to keep them entertained.
    • A crate by itself is not a particularly comfortable thing. You should include a dog bed, padding, pillows or blankets to create a cosy environment.
    • We’ve mentioned this already, but it is worth repeating, do not use your dog’s crate as a form of punishment when they misbehave. Sending them to their kennel when they’re naughty will be seen as a negative, making the crate an undesirable space.
    • Placing a blanket or special cover over the crate can help your dog if they are generally anxious.
    • Though your dog may respond well to training, make sure you experiment with what happens once you leave the room. If they begin to cry or whine in their crate they may be suffering from separation anxiety. This is not uncommon in dogs but will require training and patience.
    • Dog’s are not as good at toilet control as humans. Remember that before placing them in a crate especially for more than an hour – else you may return to an unpleasant surprise. Also consider this if they’re still potty training.
    • Never use a crate for long term accommodation for your dog. Leaving them locked in a crate all day while at work is unfair on the dog and makes the crate seem like a bad place to be.

    Summary

    We hope you found our guide to the best crate for a French Bulldog helpful in making your decision.

    A dog crate can be a great way of giving your Frenchie their own space where they can relax, sleep and feel safe. To achieve this you need to find a crate that is spacious, that can be padded out for comfort and invest time in training your dog to be happy in their crate.

    Check out our Crates section for more dog crate related guides and articles. Remember to leave a comment, recommendation or review below or join us on our Facebook page.

    The post 7 Best Dog Crates for French Bulldogs [Sizes & Training for 2020] appeared first on Collar and Harness Magazine.


    7 Best Dog Crates for Beagles [Sizes & Training for 2020]

    Looking for the best dog crates for a Beagle? Check out our reviews and read about the right sizing and training advice for your dog. The post 7 Best Dog Crates for Beagles [Sizes & Training for 2020] appeared first on Collar and Harness...

    When researching the best dog crate for a Beagle we concluded that the AmazonBasics Metal Dog Crate, 36″ provided the best value, size and requirements for the breed.

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    This metal dog crate is both sturdy and reasonably priced. Available as a single or double door crate, it is easy to erect and collapse should you need to store it away.

    There are optional dividers which let you adjust the size of the crate when your Beagle is a puppy and expand out when they are fully grown. There is a removable plastic crate at the bottom which can be easily cleaned. Each door is double slide bolted to stop any four-legged escape artists.

    Charles Darwin’s ship, HMS Beagle, was named after the breed. Lyndon B Johnson and Barry Manilow owned them. In fiction, Captain Archer always returned to his quarters to find his beloved Porthos on Star Trek Enterprise.

    The Beagle is one of the most recognisable and loved dog breeds around. They are scent hounds, and they love to sniff. So much so – you’ll often spot them at customs ports around the world.

    Fans of Peanuts will be familiar with the sight of their favourite Beagle, Snoopy, on his outdoor kennel roof. Well, with Snoopy in mind we now move on to the indoor kennel, the dog crate.

    In this article, we will review our seven best dog crates for Beagles. We will look at why crates are good for both adult and puppy Beagles, consider the sizings required and give general hints and tips on good crate training for your pup.

    Best Dog Crates for Beagles – Out Top Seven

    1. 🏆 AmazonBasics Double-Door Folding Metal Dog Crate

    Strong, spacious and exceptional value for money – the AmazonBasic crate is certainly simple but functional.

    Available as a double or single door crate, the metal design can be collapsed down with ease and stored away when needed.

    There is a plastic pan at the bottom which can be removed and cleaned if required.

    Available in all territories including UK, USA, Canada and Australia.

    AmazonBasics Double-Door Folding Metal Dog Crate Cage - 36 x 23 x 25 Inches

    2. MidWest iCrate Starter Kit [USA and Canada]

    We adore this crate starter kit from the hugely popular MidWest brand. Not only does it come with the sizeable 36-inch two door dog crate, but also includes a pet bed, crate cover and two dog bowls which can be affixed.

    The crate is made from metal, the bed is a machine washable fleece and the cover is polyester.

    iCrate Dog Crate Starter Kit, 36-Inch Dog Crate Kit Ideal for MED / LARGE DOGS Weighing 41 - 70 Pounds, Includes Dog Crate, Pet Bed, 2 Dog Bowls & Dog Crate Cover, 1-YEAR MIDWEST QUALITY GUARANTEE

    3. Ellie-Bo Dog Crate [UK]

    This dog crate for beagles is a two-door design and available in black or silver. It is collapsible and can be folded down to be stored away.

    The tray is non-chew and made of steel. It can be removed easily and cleaned when needed. Each door has two sliding latches at the top and the bottom – this prevents a Beagle puppy (or full-grown escape artists) from getting out.

    Ellie-Bo Dog Puppy Cage Large 36 inch Black Folding 2 Door Crate with Non-Chew Metal Tray

    4. Veehoo Folding Soft Dog Crate

    Veehoo Folding Soft Dog Crate, 3-Door Pet Kennel for Crate-Training Dogs, 5 x Heavy-Weight Mesh Screen, 600D Cationic Oxford Fabric, Indoor & Outdoor Use, 36", Beige Coffee Made from Cationic Oxford fabric and sturdy mesh material, this soft crate is lightweight, comfortable and robust.

    Designed for dogs who are already crate trained, the inner layer comprises a solid steel frame. This frame is collapsible so the crate can be packed away if required.

    The crate has mesh windows at five sides, three of which can be rolled up as doors using the zipper. It also includes a washable fleece pad and is available in a range of colours.

    Veehoo has designed this with ventilation in mind, to be easy to carry (by hand or shoulder straps when collapsed) and resistant to tearing.

    As with all soft crates, this will not be escape-proof. It really is for dogs who are already well crate trained as a naughty pup could chew their way out of the mesh dooring if they really wanted.

    5. MidWest Homes for Pets Dog Crate [USA and Canada]

    The same exceptional crate as the iCrate starter kit without all the extras.

    Dog Crate | MidWest ICrate 36 Inches Double Door Folding Metal Dog Crate w/ Divider Panel, Floor Protecting Feet & Leak Proof Dog Tray | Intermediate Dog Breed, Black

    6. AmazonBasics Folding Soft Dog Crate, 36″

    Our second soft crate, again for Beagles who are already crate trained. This is slightly less fancy than the Veehoo but is still a good option.

    This dog crate has two mesh doors at the top and front that close using a zipper. The lightweight frame is made of PVC with polyester fabrics covering it. It is also collapsible and can be folded away easily.

    AmazonBasics Folding Soft Dog Crate, 36"

    7. New World Folding Metal Dog Crate [USA and Canada]

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    Another hugely popular option for US readers, the New World dog crate comes in a single or double door option. The tray at the bottom is plastic and the crate is collapsible for movement and storage.

    New World 36" Double Door Folding Metal Dog Crate, Includes Leak-Proof Plastic Tray; Dog Crate Measures 36L x 23W x 25H Inches, Fits Intermediate Dog Breeds

    What Makes a Good Beagle Dog Crate?

    A crate should always be a friendly, comfortable, safe space for your Beagle. A place they can go to be alone, to play with their favourite toy or to sleep.

    It should not be a place of punishment. A place they are only sent when they are naughty. Though this may make an owner feel less stressed in the short run. In the long run, it will cause your dog to reject their crate.

    If you’re planning on using your crate for sleeping – it’s important that you pick something that suits the Beagle breed well.

    Sleeping arrangements are often at the preference of the owner. Although the idea of your dog sleeping in your bed may seem cute at first – after several months of broken sleep, it may be a decision you regret. Alternatives include a dog bed either in your bedroom or another room or a dog crate. For a crate, you will need space.

    Space is your first consideration. Choose something that isn’t so enormous it’s intimidating – but similarly nothing that’s too small. People often tend to make the mistake of buying smaller crates than they should which your dog will just grow to hate.

    Beagle Dog Crate Training

    Types of Beagle Dog Crates Available

    The most common crate type is a wire dog crate. These are made from metal though may vary in colour including silver, black, gold and even blue. They are designed to be both spacious and secure.

    If you choose a wire crate, you’ll probably find they have a choice of door types. Single-Door crates means, just that, a single door – often at the side. Double-Door crates have two doors, one at the front and one at the back. This is usually to do with the space available in your home.

    I’ve always found double-door crates worked best – as I have a choice of how open the crate can be when needed – but if the side is just going to hit a wall – it’s probably best just to stick with a single.

    Wire dog crates are also often collapsable. They can be folded away flat and stored away if required. This is incredibly useful when moving a crate from one room to another as moving a fully built crate through a door can be a real challenge.

    beagle, dog, sleeping - best dog crates for beagles Doors of these crates are usually double-bolt slide locks. One at the top and another at the bottom. Though it may sound a little overkill – it is far better than a bolt in the middle where, with enough force, your dog could squeeze through the gap.

    They’re also incredibly easy to clean – a real bonus if you have a puppy who is still in toilet training.

    They tend to come with a plastic tray at the bottom – to stop the flooring beneath getting damaged. This can be removed and cleaned without having to dismantle the crate.

    Obviously a wire crate in itself is not a great living environment – it’s a hard box with wire bars. You should invest in a dog bed, padding, blankets or cushions.

    If your Beagle is an adult or already crate trained, you may also consider a soft fabric dog crate. These are not only very soft and lightweight. They can be used as an indoor home or a travel crate. We use one of these when going on holiday.

    Not only can they be folded away packed in the car, but can be super handy when staying overnight at an Airbnb.

    They are a great addition to the house, usually, the doors are made of a mesh netting that uses a zipper to open and close.

    A travel crate is exactly that, a crate used for travelling. You may have seen these in veterinary surgeries – people transporting their dog or cat. You may also have seen them when people transport their pets in cars or planes.

    Often made from plastic with some metal wire parts, travel crates are designed for short term habitation only. They’re often much smaller than a standard crate so don’t give as much room as a wire crate. They are, however, a lot easier to carry and move about.

    Finally, we come to the car crate. These can be wire crates or can be special crates designed to fit the shape of the back of a car. If you are considering a crate for the car, you should research more of the safety aspects.

    Heavy-duty dog crates are also available, but these are often reserved for larger breeds and dogs with behavioural problems.

    What Size Crate for a Beagle?

    Although some guides may suggest a size of 30″ is sufficient for a Beagle, our experience has shown that this can often be too cramped. We, therefore, recommend a crate of at least 36 inches for a Beagle.

    You may be tempted to get a smaller dog crate for a Beagle puppy, however, you may consider that swapping them out once they grow means additional training – after all, you’re removing their favourite bedroom. To combat this problem, some crates have dividers.

    Dividers allow you to reduce the size of the crate and extend it as your puppy grows.

    You can measure your Beagle and compare it against the manufacturer’s guidelines. This may be handy if they use non-standard sizing or your dog is larger or smaller than normal. To do this:

    • Whilst in the standing position – measure you Beagle from the top of the nose to the base of the tail. This is the length of your Beagle. A tape measure works best for this and you should note down your measurements in inches.
    • Next, you want to establish the dog’s height. Place your dog in the upright sitting position. The length is the measurement in inches between the floor and the top of your dogs head.
    • Add a few inches to the final total to give extra room for movement and stretching out.

    If you find your measurements are between two sized crates, always go with the larger of the two. A dog can quite happily deal with a slightly larger crate. A crate that is too small, however, will not be a pleasant experience and you will no doubt have to get the larger one eventually.

    Another point to consider when buying a crate is the space available in your home. This is less of an issue if you have a large house with ample free space. However, if you live in a smaller dwelling  – you should consider where a crate of this size would comfortably fit.

    Remember, your dog will have to get in and out of their crate so more space than just the crate needs to be considered. Also, plan whether a single-door or double-door dog crate is most suited to the space available.

    Beagle Crate Training Tips

    In order for your Beagle to be happy, healthy and willing to use the crate, you will need to do some training. At first, it might seem like it’s a really long process, but with our quick guide, you should be prepared to start and make a lot of progress fairly quickly.

    AmazonBasics Double-Door Folding Metal Dog Crate Cage - 36 x 23 x 25 Inches If your Beagle is a puppy, it should be an easy start, as the puppy will likely have no negative feelings towards the crate.

    If your Beagle is an adult, there might be a few additional steps or a bit of extra time that you need to invest if they’re not too keen on the crate from the start.

    The first thing you need to do is associate the crate with good things.

    We wouldn’t recommend play and exciting toys, as you might end up with an unsettled dog being bored in the crate when you want them to be relaxed and content. Start by simply sitting in front of the crate and tossing a treat inside.

    Your dog will likely follow the treat inside to eat it. If they don’t follow the treat, toss it near the crate, then a bit closer the next time, and so on until your dog follows the treat inside.

    Once your dog is inside the crate don’t try closing them in, but simply let them come out if they wish to do so. Repeat this until you notice your dog starting to hover inside the crate, waiting for the next treat. If they start waiting inside the crate, you can reward them for that as well.

    It would be best if you move to the side of the crate at this point, and push the treat through the bars to further reinforce the idea that staying inside the crate means more treats.

    AmazonBasics Double-Door Folding Metal Dog Crate Cage - 36 x 23 x 25 Inches Play around with placing the treats through the bars. What you want to happen here is a dog lying down in the crate, waiting or gathering treats from the floor.

    You might have to do a bit of luring to achieve that, which is fine, just don’t start demanding things from your dog, or closing the crate door just yet.

    When your Beagle is happy to waltz inside the crate, lie down and wait for some treats, you should proceed to introduce movement.

    From your position to the side of the crate, shuffle along an inch or two, then return to your position and treat. Repeat this and introduce other small movements.

    If your pup exists the crate at any point due to excitement, don’t react to it, just use the previous steps to get them back in the crate and in the desired position. No forcing or pushing needs to be involved, if you don’t succeed, then stop the training for now and try again later.

    Slowly increase your movements to involve things like getting up and even walking out of the room. You should aim to be able to walk out of the room for a couple of minutes without your pup feeling the need to follow you.

    It will likely require a lot of repetitions of small movements to get to that stage. Be sure to vary the amount of movement and length of time to avoid predictability.

    Finally, if your pup is happy to stay inside the crate when you walk out of the room, even though the crate door is open, you can go back to step 1 and repeat the training, but this time you can close the door once your dog is inside the crate. Make your way through the steps we’ve covered so far. It might seem repetitive, but practice makes perfect!

    Don’t lock the doors just yet, if your pup shows any signs of discomfort or desire to come out, quickly open the crate door, and go back a step or two. Perhaps they need to practice the open door task a bit longer.

    Finally, celebrate the little successes. If your pup makes more progress than you expected, reward with treat jackpot inside the crate. If they are happy to be inside, you can even serve dinner in there too. All these things will help your Beagle to see the crate as their safe and relaxing space.

    Hints and Tips for Your Crate

    • We’ve already mentioned this – but is the most important tip if you want a dog who is happy to use and sleep in their crate. Don’t use the crate as a place for punishment.
    • Comfort is important. A crate itself is not a particularly comfortable experience and not one your dog will love sleeping in. Pad the crate out with a dog bed, pillows, blankets or padding.
    • Like any child’s bedroom, toys are always a favourite. The same for your Beagle’s space. Leave their favoured toy or something they can play with like a Kong Cone in the crate.
    • Dogs with separation anxiety may not do well once you leave the room. This will require more training.
    • Your dog crate is not a babysitter. Never leave a dog locked up all day in their crate while you go to work.
    • Puppies may not yet be fully toilet trained. Even if they are adults, dog’s cannot hold it in as long as humans can. Be mindful of this before you close the door at night.

    Summary

    We hope this article helped you in choosing the best dog crate for your Beagle. With proper training, a good dog crate can be a good alternative for sleeping, as well as a safe spot for your Beagle to get some privacy.

    Remember the training and above all, be patient. Consider the size of the crate as well as the size of your home. Make sure there’s enough room not only for the dog crate but for the doors and ability for your dog to get in and out easily.

    Check out our other dog crate guides and articles in our Crates section. Don’t forget to leave a comment in the section below or comment on our Facebook page.

    The post 7 Best Dog Crates for Beagles [Sizes & Training for 2020] appeared first on Collar and Harness Magazine.


    7 Best Dog Crates For Golden Retrievers [Sizes & Training for 2020]

    Check out our complete sizing, training and information guide to selecting the best dog crate for a Golden Retriever. The post 7 Best Dog Crates For Golden Retrievers [Sizes & Training for 2020] appeared first on Collar and Harness Magazine.

    We researched the best dog crate for Golden Retrievers and found the  MidWest iCrate Starter Kit was best for USA and Canada readers and the Ellie-Bo 42″ Crate for our UK readers.

    Golden Retrievers are a popular medium-large sized gun dog breed originally from Scotland. Owners of the breed will know they are often full of energy, always keep to play but are quite easy to play.

    The other thing to note about this friendly breed is that they are a long-coated breed – frequently shedding – much to the delight of the household vacuum cleaner.

    This makes sleeping arrangements slightly more of consideration than some of their shorter-haired compatriots.

    In general, dogs sleeping habits come down to the preference of the owner. Normally a dog will either sleep with the owner, sleep in a designated dog bed (or sofa), sleep outside in a kennel (more common in the USA than the UK) or sleep in a crate.

    Sleeping in a bed can be problematic. In addition to the hair shedding, as one of the larger dog breeds, they can take up quite a bit of space which, as Great Dane owners ourselves, can lead to a lot of nights of broken sleep.

    This article will look at our choice of the best dog crates for Golden Retriever, why a crate may be a good option for your adult or puppy, what makes a good crate, what sizes you should consider and what hints and tips go into training your dog for a happy crate life.

    Best Dog Crates for Golden Retriever – Our Top Seven

    1. 🏆 MidWest iCrate Starter Kit [USA and Canada]

    This is an amazing product for our USA and Canadian readers – the MidWest Kit is a complete kit for your dog including a two-door wire crate, a dog bed for padding the inside, a snug crate cover and two dog bowls which can be attached to the crate.

    The bed is made from fleece and the crate cover from polyester – this not only makes them comfortable – but machine washable should they get soiled.

    iCrate Dog Crate Starter Kit, 42-Inch Dog Crate Kit Ideal for LARGE DOG BREEDS Weighing 71 - 90 Pounds, Includes Dog Crate, Pet Bed, 2 Dog Bowls & Dog Crate Cover, 1-YEAR MIDWEST QUALITY GUARANTEE

    2. Ellie-Bo 42″ Crate [UK]

    Ellie-Bo Dog Puppy Cage XLarge 42 inch Black Folding 2 Door Crate with Non-Chew Metal Tray

    3. AmazonBasics Dog Crate – 42″

    AmazonBasics Double-Door Folding Metal Dog Crate Cage - 42 x 28 x 30 Inches One of the most popular dog crates available online with a measurement of 42 x 28 x 30 inches. This metal wire crate comes with either a single door or double door option.

    As a folding crate, it means you can collapse it down flat if you need to store it or move it between rooms.

    The doors are secured with two sliding locks which will stop your dog squeezing through with enough push.

    Mini dividers on the crates bottom perimeter stop your dog from slipping their paws out between the bars.

    This crate does include divider panels – which means you can adjust the size of the crate. This could be useful if you want to start the crate at a smaller size when your dog is still a puppy and gradually expand as they grow.

    4. MidWest Life Stages 42″ Folding Metal Dog Crate [USA and Canada]

    Large Dog Crate | MidWest ICrate Double Door Folding Metal Dog Crate|Large Dog, Black

    5. New World Folding Metal Dog Crate [USA]

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    New World Folding Metal Dog Crate New World Folding Metal Dog Crate No ratings yet

    New World 42" Double Door Folding Metal Dog Crate, Includes Leak-Proof Plastic Tray; Dog Crate Measures 42L x 30W x 28H Inches, Fits Large Dog Breeds

    6. AmazonBasics Folding Soft Dog Crate for Crate-Trained Dogs

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    AmazonBasics Folding Soft Dog Crate, 42' AmazonBasics Folding Soft Dog Crate, 42" No ratings yet

    AmazonBasics Portable Folding Soft Dog Travel Crate Kennel - 31 x 31 x 42 Inches, Tan

    7. Easipet Blue Metal Dog Cage [UK]

    Easipet Blue Metal Dog Cages In 5 Sizes (42" XX-Large)

    Choosing the Right Crate for your Golden Retriever

    A crate, sometimes called a kennel, is a good way to create a safe, friendly and secure sleeping space for your Golden Retriever. They’re not only good as a “bedroom” for your dog to sleep in, but also gives them their own space which can benefit both them and yourself.

    A crate should not be seen as a punishment. It’s not a device to lock your dog in all day when you go to work. Instead, it should be a place they are free to go during the day and for them to sleep at nighttime.

    The type of crate you choose is important. Once trained, you should be able to close them into a crate at night without them being distressed or escaping.

    They must also be a good size, both for the space you have available in your home as well as for the size of the dog. At a minimum, a crate should be big enough for your Golden Retriever to stand in, lie down and move around comfortably without feeling too constrained.

    You’ll probably want to consider using a wire crate, at least to begin with. Training can take some time and patience – and puppies (as well as adults) love to chew through things.

    The crate should also be easy to clean. Anywhere a dog sleeps has a tendency to get a little smelly over time – so it’s good hygiene that they are cleaned regularly. You should also consider that if you have a puppy – crate training may come at the same time as food and toilet training – so a fabric crate may not be the best option.

    The end goal here is to create a friendly, safe environment that your Golden Retriever will enjoy being in and won’t be a “bad place” to be sent.

    Types of Golden Retriever Dog Crates

    We’ve established what your pup will need from a crate – but what sorts of crates are available? If you go to your local pet store or browse online – you will see a number of different options and differences. The main crate types are:

    Metal Wire Crates and Kennels

    Wire dog crates are the most common types of crates and are often made from metal. They are rectangular and made of robust metal bars.

    There are two-door options with these crates – single or double doors. This is often decided by the amount of space available in your home – though it’s always easier to get a two-door if you have space.

    They are collapsible and can be folded away and stored if needed. This is also useful if trying to move the crate between rooms – trying to get a Golden Retrievers rather large dog crate through a door while still unfolded can be a challenge, believe me – I’ve tried.

    The metal also makes this a very chew-proof type of crate. It’s also fairly escape-proof with doors often having bolt locks at both the top and bottom of each door. Some have finer guards around the bottom of the crate to stop your dog clawing outside of it.

    A plastic tray is often provided for the bottom of the crate. This is for placing padding or bedding on the bottom for sleeping it. It also means the crate can be cleaned a lot easier should accidents occur.

    Fabric (Soft) Crates

    We’ve had a few of these over the years and they’re great for both smaller and medium-sized and as a dual at-home and travel crate.

    Made from fabric these are very soft, lightweight and compact.

    A mesh netting usually acts as a door with a zip for opening and closing.

    These are good for a dog who is already crate and toilet trained – but not a good choice for those untrained or puppies. They’re easier to chew proof and to get dirty – though many do include a plastic tray at the bottom just in case.

    Heavy Duty Dog Crates

    This may be overkill for a breed like a Golden Retriever but you can get extremely hard-wearing metal crates for overly pushy, large or strong dogs if the situation calls for it.

    Travel Crates

    These tend to be made of plastic and wire (though you can use a soft crate if you have one). They’re generally a lot smaller than a standard crate and used for transporting a dog from one place to another, particularly when mobility is an issue.

    You often see plastic crates being taken to vet surgeries and for travelling. These are not recommended for living in as they are fairly compact and won’t give your dog a lot of room to sleep and stretch out.

    Car Crates

    Specialist crates designed to go into cars. Some people use standard crates for this while others are available which fit the shape of a car better.

    puppy, golden retriever, dog

    What Size Crate for my Golden Retriever?

    Although several online guides will suggest a 36″ crate is sufficient for a Golden Retriever, our experience has found that for most adult dogs, this is insufficient. We recommend you explore a 42 inches crate as the best size for most adult Golden Retrievers.

    This gives sufficient room for both male and female adults. Though females may be okay in a 36″, it’s probably best to go with the larger of the two.

    There is an argument for getting smaller crates for Golden Retriever puppies so it doesn’t overwhelm them. In our experience, this can work – but your dog will probably become attached to their home and won’t be happy giving it up when the eventual replacement comes along.

    We’ve had great success with a large crate on puppies. Some crates also include dividers which means you can shrink down the size of the crate and expand as your dog grows.

    If you want to measure your Golden Retriever to check against the manufacturer’s specification – you should:

    • From the tip of the nose to the base of tail, measure your Golden Retriever with a measuring tape while they’re standing and take note of the result in inches. This will be the crate length.
    • Measure them from the floor to the top of the head while they’re in a sitting up position. Again, not the results down in inches. This will be the crate height.
    • Add a few extra inches to the length and height – this gives a little extra wiggle room.

    If you check these measurements against the product specifications and find you’re borderline between a smaller or larger option – we always recommend going for the larger of the two.

    Finally, you should also consider, possibly, one of the most overlooked parts of buying a dog crate. Consider the size of the home you’re putting it and make sure there is room.

    If you live in a large house with ample space, this will be less of an issue – however, if your abode is small – you may want to consider where it will go that has space. Remember the dog will need to get in and out of the crate without too much fuss. This may also help you decide if you’re going for a single or double doored crate.

    dog, golden retriever, puppy

    Golden Retriever Crate Training Tips

    Any behavioural training for a dog will deliver huge benefits to both you and your pup. As with toilet, food and recall training – sound crate training can result in a number of benefits. These include:

    • Creating a safe, friendly space which your dog can enjoy, laze and sleep in
    • Gets your dog used to crates which may also be required for travelling or visiting the vet
    • Are a good place to teach and train your puppy eating habits as well as toilet training
    • It allows both you and your dog to get a sound sleep at night

    The ideal outcome if crate training should be, like recall, your dog going to their crate on command. Commands such as “go to bed” or “go to your crate” can be delivered in a friendly way.

    Remember, crates should be a positive experience for your dog, not a form of punishment. Training them in a reinforcing way will give you the best out of your crate.

    Crate training works best with a puppy, however, if you have an adult dog, such as a foster or rescue, it will work too – you just may need a little more patience.

    Follow these steps for getting to the stage where your Golden Retriever is quite happy treating their crate as their own bedroom.

    Step 1: Praise and Treat

    Before you begin – you will need treats the dog will enjoy. In fact, you will need a lot of treats. The types of treats will depend on your dog – it can involve a little bit of trial and error before finding something they really respond well to.

    Start by opening the door of the crate and throwing a treat inside. This is the real acid test. If they bound straight in – you’re off to an excellent start. If they just look on in trepidation – you may be in for the long haul.

    It’s worth noting that if your dog has had a previously bad experience with crates – you may need to start from the outside of the crate first.

    Once inside the crate, make sure to praise them. Make a big fuss. Don’t worry if they come out straight after – the hardest part is over.

    Keep repeating this step until your dog is confident entering the crate. Never force the dog as they will only start rejecting the crate.

    Step 2: Familiarity with the Environment

    Now that you’ve managed the hardest part – it’s time to get your dog used to being in their new bedroom.

    Leaving the door still open you want to leave them in the crate for a short time and encourage them to stay inside.

    You want your dog to start lying down in the crate and expecting those tasty morsels without needing to come out of the crate. To achieve this, you will start dropping the treats into the crate through the bars on the side of the crate. As before, repeat this many times and try spreading the treats around the crate as it’s likely to encourage lying down.

    If your pup comes out, just repeat the steps to get him back inside. This will also give you a good practice of tying it all together as one behaviour.

    Step 3: Fidget, shuffle, move

    If your dog is happy going into the crate and lying down without any fuss or a lot of luring, then you can start desensitising to your movements.

    Your goal is to show your dog that it’s fine to stay in the crate even if you’re moving. Start with small movements, something like extending your arm, shuffling an inch from your current spot and back, or similar, making sure you dish out a treat through the bars each time you return to your original position.

    The more you break down the training, the easier it will become.

    Gradually increase your movements, until you can do something like walking out of the room and coming back to see your pup still in the crate (even though the door is still open).

    Be sure to mix it up and not just go from moving an inch to leaving the room for 10 minutes.

    Once you’ve done a lot of repetitions, and have successfully left the room for up to 5 minutes and returned, you can move onto the next step.

    Step 4: Let’s close the door

    We’re sending you back to step 1 here. The task is to recreate all the training so far, but this time you close the door without locking it.

    If closing the door surprises your pup at first, be sure to quickly open the door before your pup gets the chance to push, nudge, or paw at the door.

    You want to preempt any panic reactions to being confined. Work through all the previous steps, but occasionally mix it up with leaving the crate door open.

    Keep an eye on your dog’s body language. You want your dog to be relaxed and content when inside the crate. If your dog looks worried, go back a couple of steps and repeat the steps without closing the crate door until you can see a relaxed dog.

    General Hints and Tips for Dog Crates

    • A crate by itself is really just an empty shell. Add padding or cushions to the base so your dog has something to sleep on. You’ll have the best success if you find something machine washable or waterproof
    • Like a child, dogs love having a toy in their bedroom. Place a favourite toy or something to chew on like a Kong Cone to keep them entertained
    • Don’t use the crate as a place for punishment. Yes, your Golden Retriever may have just eaten your favourite slippers – but sending them to their box will only make it an association with negative things
    • A crate is not a permanent living place. Locking your dog in their crate all day while you go to work is not only a bad experience for your dog but will make them loathe the crate in the long run
    • Beware of separation anxiety. Some dogs hate being left by themselves and despite all of your efforts in crate training – they may still whine and bark the second you leave the room. It’s a good idea to test this with a camera or by standing outside the room you’ve just left. If you find they’re unhappy – you should consider separation training
    • When it comes to bladder and bowel control – dogs don’t have the waiting skills of humans. When they need to go, they need to go. Remember this before you close the door – otherwise, you make come back to an unpleasant surprise
    • If your dog is craving privacy or is distracted by the things going on outside the crate – consider a blanket or a crate cover for putting over the top of it. It will generally help them to sleep more soundly.

    Summary

    When looking for the best og crate for a Golden Retriever you want to create a safe, comfortable environment for them to enjoy and sleep in.

    Whether they are a puppy or an adult – you shouldn’t treat a crate as punishment but as a place they want to be. This comes with training and patience.

    Make sure to pick a dog crate which is big enough for them and first in well with your home.

    The results will be a happy dog and happier nights sleep.

    You can read more dog crate guides and articles in our Crates section. Don’t forget to leave a comment below or join us on our Facebook page.

    The post 7 Best Dog Crates For Golden Retrievers [Sizes & Training for 2020] appeared first on Collar and Harness Magazine.


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