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  • November 03, 2015 10:25:55 PM
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A Little About Us

Blogging Paws is a blog site to bring you cost saving tips, fun pet friendly recipes, health information & even training advice. This site is aimed at being breeder & rescue friendly because the creator is a health testing breeder and exhibitor who is also active in the rescue world. We hate to see rescues & breeders at odds so we strive to bring the truth to the table to better unite us all in making the world a better place for our companions.

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The Best Dog Haircuts

There are a few dogs who need to be regularly trimmed. Yes, they are like us humans in that way. Their hair grows and gets too long. It can get matted. It can look downright shameful. There are times they need to get a good clipping. Okay, there are the dogs with little to no Read...

There are a few dogs who need to be regularly trimmed. Yes, they are like us humans in that way. Their hair grows and gets too long. It can get matted. It can look downright shameful. There are times they need to get a good clipping.

Okay, there are the dogs with little to no hair. They don’t need to keep trim when it comes to the hair, so we’ll leave them out of this piece. That includes bulldogs, chihuahuas, beagles, Great Danes, and other similar breeds. We’re here to talk about the dogs that can look shaggy and not in a good way. Let’s explore a dog’s haircuts.

Why Give a Dog a Haircut

A dog doesn’t generally get a haircut just to get a new look or spruce up their appearance before their hair begins to drag on the floor. Their hair will only grow so far, but it can still look pretty bad. It can get matted which is unforgettable for the dog and unhealthy. It can get dirty which then requires the owner to do a lot of doggie baths. That can get expensive and messy.

Since a dog cannot tell their owner they need a haircut, the owner has to be the one to decide on getting the job done. Yes, some like to cut a dog’s hair for fun as they do their own, but there are two big reasons a dog should get a haircut: to aid in good hygiene and to make them feel comfortable in bad weather. Let’s explore these.

Good Hygiene

Look at what we do for good hygiene. We brush our teeth so they don’t rot. We wash our face so the skin doesn’t showcase sores. We wash our hands so we don’t make ourselves sick. Dogs need good hygiene as well. Unkempt hair can make them sick.

A dog’s face can get dirty with long hair around the eyes and mouth. All the food they eat, gets into that long hair. Eyes can get infected when the hair around them is matted with dust and fluids from the eyes. Sores can develop. Infection can set in. Keeping the hair on their face trimmed is part of taking care of a dog.

Now let’s consider the opposite end. Dogs don’t use toilet paper. What does that mean? They can’t keep themselves too clean there. Yes, they can clean the area well, but long hair can be a hindrance to a good cleaning. An untrimmed rear can cause matting and eventually difficulty going to the bathroom. Excrement gets caught in the hair and clots up. The dog is uncomfortable and will do nearly anything to get rid of the annoyance that can became painful. This is one very important reason to give a dog a haircut.

Speaking of feeling uncomfortable…

Consider the Weather

Bitter cold or intense heat can take a toll on your dear pet. Too much hair on your dog can increase the impact heat has them. They are uncomfortable and less active when they feel like they are being smothered by their own hair. Too little hair in the coldest of winters can cause them to shiver and not go outside to do their business.

Take the Husky for example. They are bred to survive in the Arctic Circle. That means heavy fur that keeps them wrong. This can be uncomfortable in the tropics. Less hair is better for them. Then there is a little terrier. You don’t want a short cut when the harsh winters hit. They’ll freeze.

Consider the weather when you give your dog a haircut. Keep it trimmed but not too much in winter and a little more so in the summer. Give them relief from the temperatures simply by choosing the right cut.

Now what is the right cut?

Haircut Styles to Consider

What is your intent with getting your dog’s hair cut? Looks? Just the hygiene part? There are a few styles you might want to consider when you get your dog groomed.

Shaved – This is not one that is highly recommended as it is mostly for extreme cases. A shave is literally getting down to the skin and removing all the hair. This might be necessary if your dog is extremely matted, suffering from fleas, or has a skin condition. Shaving should be reserved for starting over and not something you want to do regularly. How would you like to be shaved completely bald and then forced to walk the neighborhood naked? That’s what a shave does to your dog.

Poodle – This is a widely recognized cut that poodles seem to have around the globe. I could say just look at a poodle to know what it looks like, but that feels lazy. Basically, a poodle cut is very short hair (not shaved) on the body and puffs of hair left long around head, neck, and at times around the ankles. A few might even leave a puff of hair at the tip of the tail. The poodle breed is not the only one that can successfully have this cut, but they are the most known for it.

Teddy Bear – This is one of the cutest cuts around. It is designed to make your dog into a cuddle teddy bear, at least in looks. It is similar to a poodle cut in that there is more hair around the face than the rest of the body but is not a poof as the poodle cut. It is more rounded.

Neat and Clean – This is just a simple cut where you want your dog comfortable and clean. You want the face trimmed and the bottom neat so your dog avoids sores, infections, and just plain uncomfortable matting. Any groomer will understand your needs if you just want a neat and clean trim.

By Breed – Most breeds have their own unique cut that causes them to stand out. We mentioned one in the poodle cut. It is hard to determine a poodle if they aren’t presented in such a style. Other breeds have unique cuts such as the Afghan, the silky terrier, or even a spaniel. Yorkies usually get a different cut from a terrier. You can check online or with your groomer to see which cut suits your breed the most. Some long hair breeds have unique styles to show off the thickness of their tail or the depths of their coloring.

Choosing a Groomer

With a better idea of the right haircut for your dog, now you ask yourself where to go and get the job done and done right? There are many places. Look online and find dozens near you. There are groomers who come to your house. There are groomers in pet salons. There are groomers in pet stores.

Talk to the groomer. Express your desires and get a good feel for them. If you don’t feel comfortable, choose a different groomer. You need to feel secure in who is grooming your dog. Look for reviews and get recommendations from other dog owners. Word of mouth is one of the best ways to find anyone in the service industry. A good reputation is worth the money.

Speaking of money, how much does it cost? That can vary on the groomer, the breed, and the cut you choose. Ask the groomer what their prices are. Comparison shop. The more intricate the cut, the more expensive. A simple cut can be as low as $30 dollars depending on where you live. Groomers who work out of their own homes usually cost a little less. Large pet stores have specials due to so many groomers in training. Go where you feel comfortable and where you can afford the best cut for your pet.

Give the Dog Pride

When you consider giving your dog a haircut, make sure they aren’t ashamed of it. Make them want to parade with such a nice doo. Keeping with the breed cuts is the safest way to go. You don’t want to give your little silky a poodle doo. People will get confused when they look at the poor fellow.

Choose a cut that is comfortable for your dog, helps keep them healthy, and looks good on them. It’s about being practical, but it can be about style. You want your dog looking good when they go out for their walks. You can also strut knowing you are the one behind your pet looking so good. Nothing says a good pet owner like a well looking dog.

Conclusion

If your dog has hair that needs to be groomed, don’t let the hair get too long. Get the best haircut for your dog that will keep them looking good and feeling comfortable. Talk with your groomer. Build a relationship where you, the groomer, and the dog are all trusting each other. Research your dog. Talk with the experts. Shop around and find the best haircut for your little pet. They are so worth it.

Guest Post


You Can’t Force a Dog to Run

With the Animal Rights Nuts now going full force after the take down of Greyhound racing I want to talk about one of the most recent Dog Sports in their cross hairs at this time of year, the Iditarod dog race, also been called the “Great Race of Mercy”.  This race has been in existence Read...

With the Animal Rights Nuts now going full force after the take down of Greyhound racing I want to talk about one of the most recent Dog Sports in their cross hairs at this time of year, the Iditarod dog race, also been called the “Great Race of Mercy”.  This race has been in existence since March 3, 1973 and it runs every year from Anchorage to Nome, Alaska on the first Saturday of March and ends when the last mushing team crosses the finish line. This race is run as a tribute to the heroic efforts of dogs and mushers who helped save the people of Nome, Alaska in 1925, who suffered an outbreak of diphtheria that had potential to wipe out most of the region’s population of only about 10,000.  The race is also a way to keep this historic trade route alive, the Iditarod Trail, also known as the Seward-to-Nome Mail Trail. It is impassable during all seasons but Winter and during this outbreak air delivery was unavailable, there were no roads or trains to Nome, nor could ships reach the town because of the sea ice. Their last resort was finding the fastest teams of sled dogs and mushers to save Nome.

With the introduction of snowmobiles to Alaska, the culture and possibly even an entire breed of canine was going to meet its end. A man by the name of Joe Redington saw this and wanted to preserve the Alaskan Husky (different breed than the more common Siberian Husky) and the historic trail between Seward and Nome.  Joe Redington is known as the “father of Iditarod”, he is the man that had the drive to get this race started, with help from Dorothy G. Page, chairman of the Wasilla-Knik Centennial Committee.

The Animal Rights activists have brainwashed the common pet owner with false information.  All of that stuff that you read that dogs are suffering and being forced to run so not true. Anyone we’re even the slightest common sense knows you can’t force a dog to run competitively. A dog will only run with competitive time if the dog loves what it’s doing.

Here is a Facebook post from a volunteer at one of the checkpoints during the race:

I fear that I will see the extinction of working dogs & dog sports during my time on earth.  And this will be a great loss to many breeds and the whole culture of people who love their dogs and love giving their dogs jobs to do.  Dogs with jobs are happier and healthier than their obese counterparts on your couch. Not to mention it’s an excellent way to bond with your pooch and meet more people in the sport world who want to truely protect companion animals.

https://iditarod.com/about/history/
https://www.cdc.gov/about/24-7/savinglives/diphtheria/index.html


Wild Frontier by Nutro… continued…

So Mr. Idle has been on a mix of 2 cups dry + 1 can twice a day since August 5th.  He’s a 65-70lb Male Berger Picard.  He took right to this food, no loose stools or upset tummy.  Idle has no known allergies or intolerant so didn’t hesitate on giving this food a go Read...

So Mr. Idle has been on a mix of 2 cups dry + 1 can twice a day since August 5th.  He’s a 65-70lb Male Berger Picard.  He took right to this food, no loose stools or upset tummy.  Idle has no known allergies or intolerant so didn’t hesitate on giving this food a go but if your dog has allergies please look at ingredient list.  I found some things in the list that weren’t in the name (check our first two posts), but this also goes for any foods you’re trying.

Overall, he’s put weight on and skin/fur look great.  I chose the canned salmon to try to get some salmon oils in his system.  Salmon oils are good for skin and coats.  I’d of expected some Omega nutrients but nothing is listed within the can’s text to support any such content so it’s unknown if there are in fact any present.

I do like that this food includes organ meat but I’d like to know how much nutrients is preserved after the cooking process.  Anyone know? I’d be happy to post.

So far very happy with the outcome of this food, stay tuned for our final update as we finish up the month with Wild Frontier by Nutro.


Wild Frontier by Nutro… Canned

So if you read our previous post, we also ordered Salmon & Liver Stew Grain-Free Adult Canned Dog Food Salmon & Liver Canned Ingredients Chicken Broth, Chicken, Salmon, Liver, Potato Starch, Dried Egg Product, Dried Pork Broth, Calcium Carbonate, Natural Flavor, Sunflower Oil (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Salt, Dried Tomatoes, Guar Gum, Potassium Chloride, Sodium Read...

So if you read our previous post, we also ordered Salmon & Liver Stew Grain-Free Adult Canned Dog Food

Salmon & Liver Canned Ingredients
Chicken Broth, Chicken, Salmon, Liver, Potato Starch, Dried Egg Product, Dried Pork Broth, Calcium Carbonate, Natural Flavor, Sunflower Oil (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Salt, Dried Tomatoes, Guar Gum, Potassium Chloride, Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate, Tetrasodium Pyrophosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Sodium Hexametaphosphate, Xanthan Gum, Ferrous Sulfate, Choline Chloride, Magnesium Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Vitamin E Supplement, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Sodium Selenite, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Potassium Iodide, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin.

Calories: 820 kcal/kg, 291 kcal/can

We also start with talking about ingredients.  In the name of the product there was no mention of what kind of liver was used.  Was it beef, pork, chicken etc?  In the ingredients of a Salmon-in-name-first food it starts with CHICKEN!  We have Chicken broth then Chicken, Salmon makes it on list at 3rd followed by, still, nondescript ‘Liver’.  A little further down we see Pork broth.  I’d of expected Salmon (or even liver) to be first, most used.  I was hoping this food would offer some fishy oils for improved coat/skin rather than doing the oil caplets.  Just looking at ingredients, if your dog has an allergy to poultry, stay away.

At almost $3.00 a can I’d of much liked more salmon involved.

We’ll follow up with how our dog (Idle, 5yr old Berger Picard) is doing on the food, stay tuned!

 


Wild Frontier by Nutro

We were approached by Chewy.com to perform a 30 day review of Wild Frontier by Nutro in both wet & dry.  We chose Beef & Wild Boar Grain-Free Adult Dry Dog Food & Salmon & Liver Stew Grain-Free Adult Canned Dog Food. My first impression was expensive at $2.89/can & $2.77/lb, but I do like Read...

We were approached by Chewy.com to perform a 30 day review of Wild Frontier by Nutro in both wet & dry.  We chose Beef & Wild Boar Grain-Free Adult Dry Dog Food & Salmon & Liver Stew Grain-Free Adult Canned Dog Food.

My first impression was expensive at $2.89/can & $2.77/lb, but I do like the small kibble size.

Beef & Wild Boar Dry Ingredients

Beef, Split Peas, Pork Meal, Chicken Meal, Dried Potatoes, Chicken Fat (Preserved With Mixed Tocopherols), Tapioca, Fish Meal, Wild Boar, Natural Flavor, Dehydrated Alfalfa Meal, Turkey Liver, Pork Heart, Pork Kidney, Dried Plain Beet Pulp, Pea Protein, Flaxseed, Choline Chloride, Potassium Chloride, Dl-Methionine, Salt, Mixed Tocopherols And Citric Acid (Preservatives), Zinc Sulfate, Niacin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin E Supplement, Iron Amino Acid Chelate, Selenium Yeast, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement (Vitamin B2), Copper Amino Acid Chelate, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Manganese Amino Acid Chelate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Rosemary Extract.

Calories: 3,681 kcal/kg, 407 kcal/cup

Let’s talk about the above ingredients in the dry kibble.  First ingredient, Beef, as most dog food gurus know once cooked those whole meats lose a lot of weight due to the loss of moisture.  The next ingredient I expected should have been Wild Boar.  I mean if I’m purchasing a food with the meats in the name don’t you expect to see it on top of the list?!  We don’t see ‘pork’ unti 3rd in line after Split Peas, a filler and potential controversial vegetable.  Then we move to Chicken Meal, basically condensed, rich poultry protein, didn’t see Chicken mentioned in the name of the mixture but it’s higher than ‘Wild Boar’.  They also use chicken fat & fish meal before we even get to boar.  Wild Boar falls at #9 in the ingredient list, I was taught to look at the first 6 ingredients since they carry the most weight in the food.  So we’re potentially getting beef (but remember it’s lost a lot of weight due to moisture loss during cooking), peas, pork-chick-fish meal, potatos and chicken fat. A little further down they throw in some turkey.

Basically, if your pooch has a poultry allergy, even if the food is label Beef & Wild Boar, it’s not.  Feel like I’ve been a bit hood-winked.

In our next blog of this series, we’ll talk about the Salmon & canned liver food.


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