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Bee Blog D-Tek Live Bee Removal San Diego

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  • Dave Reed
  • April 30, 2019 01:43:06 AM
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Our Apiarist has year of experience under his belt when it comes to bee behavior, beekeeping and bee removal. Ever wondered why bees swarm or what are the healing properties of honey? You'll find these answers and more in our Bee Blog.

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    3 Myths About Bees Debunked

    How much do you know about bees? As prominent figures in our culture, we can find images of bees in children’s books, on cereal boxes and as mascots to sports teams. With bees being so prevalent, you’d think we’d all know everything there is to know about them. In reality, most of us don’t know… The post 3 Myths About Bees Debunked appeared first on Live Bee...

    myths about bees

    How much do you know about bees? As prominent figures in our culture, we can find images of bees in children’s books, on cereal boxes and as mascots to sports teams. With bees being so prevalent, you’d think we’d all know everything there is to know about them. In reality, most of us don’t know as much as we think we do! 

    There are a lot of myths out there about bees and what they do and why. And that’s understandable – with more than 20,000 species of bees on the planet, there is so much variation among bee species. Many of the common misconceptions about bees persist because, when most of us think of bees, we are all thinking about the same bee – the honey bee. 

    Today we are going to take a look at three of the most common myths about bees and set the record straight. Here we go! 

    3 Common Myths About Bees 

    Myth 1: All bees make honey. 

    When most people think of bees, they think of honey. But, you might be surprised to learn that most bees don’t actually make honey. Honey is only produced by social species of bees that live in colonies. They make the honey to feed the brood and queen during the winter months. 

    Most bee species are solitary, meaning that they do not live in colonies or in hives with hundreds or thousands of other bees. They use nectar and pollen to make the food they need to keep their young alive. 

    And here’s another interesting fact: there are some species of wasps that also make honey! 

    Myth 2: Bees don’t sting at night. 

    Many people believe that bees can’t see at night or that they simply aren’t able to sting in the dark. Although we might hope this is true, the fact is that honey bees are perfectly capable of stinging you at night. The reason many people believe this myth is because bee stings at night are relatively rare. 

    In the evening, honey bees typically retire to their nests. They stop gathering pollen and nectar and rest in preparation for the next day’s work. The cooler temperatures keep the bees in the hive or clustered around it until the next day. With the bees tucked away in their home, they are far less likely to sting humans at night. However, if you decide to bother the nest, they will not hesitate to sting, so be careful! 

    Myth 3: Bees are dangerous. 

    There are a lot of people out there who are seriously afraid of bees. The sight of a hive or swarm is enough to send them into a panic. The reality is that most bees are completely harmless when left alone. And unless you are allergic to bee venom, a bee sting is just a painful and temporary nuisance. In fact, some research suggests that most adults can sustain more than 1,000 bee stings without any serious, long-term consequences. 

    Even though bees are generally quite docile, it’s still smart to let the professionals handle any beehives or swarms on your property. When bees sense that their hive and queen may be threatened, they will not hesitate to attack. Expert bee removal specialists will have the right skills and equipment to get the job done safely. 

    Facts About Honey Bees

    We hope you learned a little more about these amazing creatures and we encourage you to share your new knowledge with others. It will be impossible to learn everything there is to know about bees and honey, but a little knowledge goes a long way in protecting and preserving bees. 

    Do you have a bee situation at your home or business? Give us a call! We love to help our customers learn more about bees and keep their properties and families safe from bee infestations. When you have a swarm or hive on your property, call D-Tek Live Bee Removal for professional live bee removal. We specialize in removing bees using natural processes and without the use of chemicals. 

    D-Tek Live Bee Removal: live bee removal, bee removal repairs and bee proofing services in San Diego County. 

    Is a beehive causing a problem on your property? Call the experts at D-Tek Live Bee Removal today. 

    The post 3 Myths About Bees Debunked appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    How to Keep Kids Safe from Bee Stings

    Summer means spending time outdoors for many families. Picnics, barbeques and baseball games are some of the highlights of the season. While there is a lot of fun to be had for kids, there are also some increased risks of getting an injury. Perhaps one of the most common types of injuries that children experience… The post How to Keep Kids Safe from Bee Stings appeared first on Live Bee...

    The summer means spending time outdoors for many families. Picnics, barbeques and baseball games are some of the highlights of the season. While there is a lot of fun to be had for kids, there are also some increased risks of getting an injury. Perhaps one of the most common types of injuries that children experience in the summer is bee stings. Bee and wasp stings aren’t fun for people of any age. But for children, a sting can be extra unpleasant. Kids can be shocked at how painful a sting from a little bee can actually be! Parents need to be extra vigilant if their child is allergic to bee stings because of the danger of very serious health issues. When Your Child Gets Stung by a Bee Children won’t always know how serious a bee sting can be, especially if they’ve never been stung before. Adults should help children to understand how to be safe around bees and what to do if they happen to get stung. Educating children before an incident occurs is the best way to keep them safe and happy this summer. Here are some common questions kids may have about bee stings as well as tips for how to best handle them when they happen. How do I know if I have a bee sting? There are a few tell-tale signs that you have been the victim of a bee or wasp sting. Usually the area stung will get hot and develop a red bump. It may also begin to itch. If you notice any of these symptoms, you should take it seriously. An allergic reaction to a bee sting can have dangerous consequences. How will I know if I’m allergic to bees? Typical allergic reactions to bee stings include: Hives Nausea Difficulty breathing Dizziness Do all bees sting? Male bees do not have stingers so they cannot sting you. If you’ve been stung by a honey bee, then you have been stung by a female bee. Their stingers have unique barbed hooks that anchor the stinger in the skin after a sting. The stinger will get stuck in the skin as the bee flies away. Because of this, honey bees can only sting you once! Other bees and wasps may be able to sting more than once because their stingers do not have this barbed feature. What should I do if I get a bee sting? The first thing a child should do if they have been stung by a bee is tell an adult. For a child that is not having an allergic reaction, the sting can be taken care of at home. If you think a reaction is occurring or if the swelling increases, contact the doctor or seek medical attention right away. EpiPens are a common emergency treatment for those who are allergic to bee stings. Honey bees will leave their stingers in the skin. The first thing to do is to carefully remove the stinger and wash the area with gentle soap and water. Reduce pain and swelling by applying ice directly to the sting. Administer a pain reliever or antihistamine if the pain or swelling is severe. Apply a baking soda and water mixture to the sting to reduce itchiness. How can I avoid bee stings? For the most part, bees don’t mean us any harm. They just want to go about their day buzzing from flower to flower. Bees will usually leave you alone unless they are disturbed. The best thing to do is leave bees and wasps alone. If you have a large swarm or hive on your property, you should contact a professional live be removal company to safely remove the bees from the premises. Never attempt to remove the bees on your own – that’s the easiest way to get stung! Avoid sweet smelling lotions or perfumes. Don’t wear bright or floral clothing. Cover food and soda cans. Wear shoes in grassy areas. San Diego Live Bee Removal – D-Tek Live Bee Removal No one wants to get stung by a bee or wasp. If you notice that you have a hive on your property, make the call to D-Tek Live Bee Removal right away. Bee hives can cause property damage to your home and the potential for nasty bee stings. And when you have children and pets to protect, you need to ensure that the bees are handled by professionals. For all of your live bee removal, bee removal repair or bee proofing needs in San Diego and San Diego county, contact the team at D-Tek Live Bee Removal for your free quote today.

    Summer means spending time outdoors for many families. Picnics, barbeques and baseball games are some of the highlights of the season. While there is a lot of fun to be had for kids, there are also some increased risks of getting an injury. Perhaps one of the most common types of injuries that children experience in the summer is bee stings. 

    Bee and wasp stings aren’t fun for people of any age. But for children, a sting can be extra unpleasant. Kids can be shocked at how painful a sting from a little bee can actually be! Parents need to be extra vigilant if their child is allergic to bee stings because of the danger of very serious health issues. 

    When Your Child Gets Stung by a Bee 

    Children won’t always know how serious a bee sting can be, especially if they’ve never been stung before. Adults should help children to understand how to be safe around bees and what to do if they happen to get stung. Educating children before an incident occurs is the best way to keep them safe and happy this summer. Here are some common questions kids may have about bee stings as well as tips for how to best handle them when they happen.   

    How do I know if I have a bee sting? 

    There are a few tell-tale signs that you have been the victim of a bee or wasp sting. Usually, the area stung will get hot and develop a red bump. It may also begin to itch. If you notice any of these symptoms, you should take it seriously. An allergic reaction to a bee sting can have dangerous consequences. 

    How will I know if I’m allergic to bees?  

    Typical allergic reactions to bee stings include: 

    • Hives 
    • Nausea
    • Difficulty breathing 
    • Dizziness 

    Do all bees sting? 

    Male bees do not have stingers so they cannot sting you. If you’ve been stung by a honey bee, then you have been stung by a female bee. Their stingers have unique barbed hooks that anchor the stinger in the skin after a sting. The stinger will get stuck in the skin as the bee flies away. Because of this, honey bees can only sting you once! Other bees and wasps may be able to sting more than once because their stingers do not have this barbed feature. 

    What should I do if I get a bee sting? 

    The first thing a child should do if they have been stung by a bee is tell an adult. For a child that is not having an allergic reaction, the sting can be taken care of at home. If you think a reaction is occurring or if the swelling increases, contact the doctor or seek medical attention right away. EpiPens are a common emergency treatment for those who are allergic to bee stings. 

    • Honey bees will leave their stingers in the skin. The first thing to do is to carefully remove the stinger and wash the area with gentle soap and water. 
    • Reduce pain and swelling by applying ice directly to the sting. 
    • Administer a pain reliever or antihistamine if the pain or swelling is severe.
    • Apply a baking soda and water mixture to the sting to reduce itchiness.  

    How can I avoid bee stings? 

    For the most part, bees don’t mean us any harm. They just want to go about their day buzzing from flower to flower. Bees will usually leave you alone unless they are disturbed. The best thing to do is to leave bees and wasps alone. If you have a large swarm or hive on your property, you should contact a professional live bee removal company to safely remove the bees from the premises. Never attempt to remove the bees on your own – that’s the easiest way to get stung! 

    • Avoid sweet-smelling lotions or perfumes.
    • Don’t wear bright or floral clothing. 
    • Cover food and soda cans. 
    • Wear shoes in grassy areas. 

    San Diego Live Bee Removal – D-Tek Live Bee Removal 

    No one wants to get stung by a bee or wasp. If you notice that you have a hive on your property, make the call to D-Tek Live Bee Removal right away. Beehives can cause property damage to your home and the potential for nasty bee stings. And when you have children and pets to protect, you need to ensure that the bees are handled by professionals. 

    For all of your live bee removal, bee removal repair or bee proofing needs in San Diego and San Diego County, contact the team at D-Tek Live Bee Removal for your free quote today. 

    The post How to Keep Kids Safe from Bee Stings appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    The Anatomy of the Honey Bee

    We already know that the honey bee is a fascinating creature with lots of interesting behaviors. Although they are small, they play a huge role in pollination and agriculture throughout the world. Without them, our food supply would look quite different than it does today.  What the honey bee lacks in size, it makes up… The post The Anatomy of the Honey Bee appeared first on Live Bee...

    honey bee anatomy

    We already know that the honey bee is a fascinating creature with lots of interesting behaviors. Although they are small, they play a huge role in pollination and agriculture throughout the world. Without them, our food supply would look quite different than it does today. 

    What the honey bee lacks in size, it makes up for in efficiency. Every part of a bee’s body is perfectly designed to help the bee perform its role in the world. Today we are going to talk more about the amazing anatomy of a honey bee and how each body part supports the bee in its life functions. 

    The Anatomy of a Honey Bee

    A honey bee’s body can be divided into three distinct sections – head, thorax and abdomen. We will take each section separately and discuss the most important body parts that can be found there. Here we go! 

    The Head 

    Eyes

    Honey bees have two compound eyes and three simple eyes. Each set of eyes serves different functions and gives the bees different advantages. What’s the difference between the two? 

    Compound eyes are the larger eyes that are made up of many hexagonal shapes. This allows the bee to see in every direction and to have polarized vision. Just like polarized sunglasses that humans might wear, polarized vision helps the honey bee navigate more effectively and protects their eyes from light. The vision in the compound eyes also helps bees to get from the hive to their food source and back. 

    Simple eyes are located on the top of a bee’s head. These eyes are made up of a single lens and are sensitive to UV light. The UV light helps bees to find pollen and aids in their orientation. 

    Proboscis

    This feature of the honey bee can extend longer than the body of the bee itself. It is almost like a human tongue. Its job is to reach deep down into flowers to extract nectar. Bees also use the proboscis to groom each other and the queen. 

    Antennae

    Antennae act as the sensory center of the honey bee. They allow the bee to touch, smell and taste. Even though bees don’t have ears as we know them, the antennae even allow bees to “hear.” Antennae have mechanoreceptors that respond to vibrations in the air allowing them to touch and hear. They also have 170 odor receptors that give them an advanced sense of smell. 

    Thorax

    In the middle a bee’s body, you will find the thorax. The body parts found in this section aid the bee in motion and collecting pollen. 

    Legs 

    Honey bees have three pairs of flexible legs that are designed to help them land on any surface. They have claws and sticky pads that help them land and stay put anywhere. The front legs help keep the antennae clean and able to act as the sensory organ of the bee. The back legs of a worker bee are tailored to help them collect and carry pollen. 

    Wings 

    Honey bees have two pairs of wings – larger front wings and smaller back wings. Both sets help bees fly at speeds of up to 15 miles per hour. 

    Pollen Basket

    Ever wonder how honey bees transport pollen from flower to flower? Bees have a structure called a pollen basket behind their back legs. When a bee visits a flower and becomes covered with pollen, it brushes the pollen from its body into the pollen basket where it is kept in place by a bunch of hairs. 

    Abdomen 

    Honey Stomach

    Nectar collected by the honey bee is stored in the honey stomach. Once the bee returns to the hive, the nectar is regurgitated and then stored in the cells of the hive. A bee can carry approximately 75mg of nectar in the honey stomach. 

    Stinger 

    Bees are known for their sting, but did you know that only female bees have stingers? Drones do not have stingers, so you never have to worry about being stung by one of these bees. Worker bees and queen bees do have stingers, but they vary slightly from each other. Worker bees have a barbed stinger. When they sting, the barbed stinger tears from the bee’s body and causes the bee to die. The queen’s stinger, on the other hand, is not barbed so she can sting multiple times without dying. 


    There is so much more to the anatomy of a honey bee, but this is a good overview of the most important parts and their functions. The next time you see a hive or swarm on your property, take a minute to appreciate the amazing makeup of the honey bee. 

    If bees are a hazard to your property or business, don’t try to remove them on your own. Contact D-Tek Live Bee Removal for safe and humane live bee removal and rehoming in San Diego County. 

    The post The Anatomy of the Honey Bee appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    What’s the Difference Between Bearding and Swarming?

    During the summertime, bees are just a fact of life here in Southern California. We are used to seeing them buzzing around our pools, picnics and soda cans. And although they can be a nuisance, they don’t generally grab our attention.   Sometimes bee behavior is a little more intriguing! Most people would agree that… The post What’s the Difference Between Bearding and Swarming? appeared first on Live Bee...

    swarm of bees

    During the summertime, bees are just a fact of life here in Southern California. We are used to seeing them buzzing around our pools, picnics and soda cans. And although they can be a nuisance, they don’t generally grab our attention.  

    Sometimes bee behavior is a little more intriguing! Most people would agree that seeing large clusters of bees is something that is quite eye-catching. Today we are going to talk about two fascinating bee behaviors: bearding and swarming. 

    On the surface, both behaviors may appear to be similar. After all, they both look like large bunches of bees gathered together. However, you might be interested to learn that bearding and swarming are two very different behaviors that serve two very different purposes. 

    At D-Tek Live Bee Removal, we like to educate our customers on typical bee habits so they can feel confident in knowing when something is an issue and when it isn’t. If you are unsure if your bee situation is a cause for concern, contact our team at D-Tek Live Bee Removal today. Our specialists are standing by to help you 24/7 and to answer any of your bee-related questions.  

    What is Bearding? 

    Bearding is one of the ways in which honey bees keep the hive cool. Bearding bees will gather on the outside of a hive in a cluster that looks like a big beard. Of course, this beard is one that you shouldn’t mess with! 

    In the summer months when the temperatures get high, conditions inside the hive can reach levels that are too extreme for the safety of the brood. There are a number of factors that could create unfavorable conditions within a hive. The hot summer sun heats up the interior of the hive during the days. At this time of year, honey bee colonies reach their highest numbers. All those bees in one small space has a tendency to create a lot of heat. 

    When temperature levels reach the mid-nineties and the humidity levels exceed 50%, bees need to take action to cool down their environment. This is where bearding comes in! Bees will exit the hive and congregate near the entrance. Bearding creates more space inside the hive, reducing the heat-producing effects of overcrowding. Bees also fan their wings near the hive entrance to assist with air flow and ventilation. 

    Fast Facts About Bearding

    • Most often seen in the mid to late summer.
    • Most commonly occurs in the late afternoon or evening. 
    • Bearding bees are relatively quiet.
    • Bearding bees cluster around the hive entrance but do not fly. 

    What is Swarming? 

    Swarming is part of the reproductive cycle of a honey bee colony. When an established colony becomes too large for its hive, about half of the colony population will split off from the group. They leave the hive with a new queen in search of another place to call home. While scouting bees search for an ideal spot for a nest, the rest of the bees will form a cluster on a tree branch, shrub, fencepost or other objects. Swarms usually only last for a few hours or a few days. As soon as they find a perfect hive location, they get to work establishing the new colony. 

    Honey bee swarms are typically harmless. The bees are not aggressive during this time since they do not have a hive or honey to protect. However, they can become a danger if they are aggravated in any way. If you find a swarm on your property, do not attempt to move them on your own. Be patient and know that they will likely move on very soon. If they are a threat, call in the professionals at D-Tek Live Bee Removal for help in rehoming the swarm with a local beekeeper. 

    Fast Facts About Swarming 

    • Occurs in the mid to late spring. 
    • Most commonly occurs in the mid-morning to mid-afternoon. 
    • Swarming bees are airborne and create a “cloud” effect.
    • Swarming bees make a roaring sound. 

    San Diego Live Bee Removal – D-Tek Live Bee Removal 

    Bee behavior and habits are intriguing to learn about. Bearding and swarming are two critical honey bee behaviors that help our local bee populations thrive. Hopefully, you are now able to tell the difference between swarming bees and bearding bees. 

    In either case, if you have questions about the bees on your property or if you need live bee removal services, don’t hesitate to call D-Tek Live Bee Removal. Our live bee removal specialists can help protect your property from bee infestations. Offering live bee removal, bee removal repair and bee proofing services to customers throughout the San Diego area. 

    Contact D-Tek Live Bee Removal today for your free quote! 

    The post What’s the Difference Between Bearding and Swarming? appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    Do Honey Bees Get Hot in the Summer?

    When the Southern California summer heats up, it is not uncommon for temperatures to reach well above 90 or even 100 degrees. Most humans have the luxury of escaping indoors or taking a dip in the pool or ocean to beat the heat.  As one of the leading live bee removal companies in San Diego… The post Do Honey Bees Get Hot in the Summer? appeared first on Live Bee...

    bearding bees

    When the Southern California summer heats up, it is not uncommon for temperatures to reach well above 90 or even 100 degrees. Most humans have the luxury of escaping indoors or taking a dip in the pool or ocean to beat the heat.  As one of the leading live bee removal companies in San Diego County, we often get asked the question: Do bees get hot in the summer? 

    The answer is yes! Although bees can thrive in high temperatures, they don’t prefer heat that is much higher than the mid-nineties. The ideal conditions within a hive are about 93 degrees and 50% humidity. When the environment gets much hotter than that, it can potentially threaten the well-being of the brood. 

    What Causes a Hive to Overheat? 

    During the dog days of summer, bees have to take various measures to regulate the climate and keep the hive from overheating. The heat of the sun shines down on the hive throughout the day creating intensely hot conditions. Plus, with colonies typically at their most populous during this time of year, overcrowding can generate high temperatures. Some of the most common causes of overheating in a beehive include: 

    • Intense heat from the sun
    • High humidity levels 
    • Overcrowding due to large bee populations
    • Lack of ventilation in the hive 

    How do bees keep cool during the heat of the summer? 

    Honey bees have a couple of different techniques to help them keep cool and protect their broods from overheating during the hot summer months. If you have any questions about typical bee behavior or if you have a beehive that’s become a nuisance on your property, call D-Tek Live Bee Removal. 

    We are your local bee experts! Using only safe and humane live bee removal techniques, we can remove the bees and honeycomb completely so you won’t have to worry about future infestations in the same location ever again. And with our live bee removal methods, the keeps are kept alive and rehomed with a San Diego area beekeeper so they can continue pollinating local crops. When you need affordable and quick live bee removal in San Diego or San Diego County, your first and only call should be to D-Tek Live Bee Removal. 

    Evaporative Cooling 

    Bees thrive when they are near a reliable water source. One of the reasons they require water is to aid in keeping the hive cool when the temperatures rise. Bees collect water and bring it back to the hive. Worker bees will get to work fanning the water pools to encourage evaporation and air ventilation. This process lowers the temperature inside the hive. It’s a very similar process to the way humans sweat! 

    Sometimes evaporative cooling is just not enough to reduce the temperature to the degree necessary to keep the bees and the brood happy and healthy. This is especially the case when the colony is at its peak population. When this occurs, bees may choose to use another cooling technique known as bearding. 

    Bearding 

    It might sound funny, but bearding is a common and effective way that honey bees keep the hive cool in the hot summer months. Bearding is when bees gather on the outside of the hive, usually near the entrance, forming a structure that looks like a thick and bushy beard. By staying outside of the hive, they are reducing the heat created by overcrowding and increasing the airflow, further cooling the space. 

    Bearding usually happens in the mid to late summer when the temperatures are at their highest. It also typically occurs late in the afternoon or early evening. At this time of day, most of the bees have returned to the hive after a long day of gathering water and nectar. The numbers inside the hive reach their highest point at this time, so it makes a perfect opportunity for bees to sleep outdoors. 

    Humane Live Bee Removal in San Diego and San Diego County 

    Do you have a large swarm that is causing trouble on your property? Have you found a large beehive that has become more than just a nuisance? Give D-Tek Live Bee Removal a call today at 760-224-3040. We specialize in safe and humane live bee removal, bee removal repairs and bee proofing services for homes and businesses throughout the San Diego area. 

    When you need fast and reliable bee removal services, don’t wait!

    Contact D-Tek Live Bee Removal for your free quote today. 

    The post Do Honey Bees Get Hot in the Summer? appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    How To Keep Bees Away From Your Swimming Pool

    Have you been noticing bees buzzing around your swimming pool? Do you know why they love your pool as much as you do? Are you wondering how they can be deterred humanely?  The warm summer weather means that honey bees are out-and-about foraging for nectar and pollinating flowers and crops. Basically, they are busy doing… The post How To Keep Bees Away From Your Swimming Pool appeared first on Live Bee...

    How To Keep Bees Away from Your Swimming Pool

    Have you been noticing bees buzzing around your swimming pool? Do you know why they love your pool as much as you do? Are you wondering how they can be deterred humanely? 

    The warm summer weather means that honey bees are out-and-about foraging for nectar and pollinating flowers and crops. Basically, they are busy doing what they do best! 

    In addition to nectar, honey bees forage for water. That’s why they are so attracted to your swimming pool. You may also notice them around some of your other water features such as fountains and ponds. No matter if your pool contains freshwater or saltwater, bees will converge on your pool to access the water that they need. 

    Don’t let an influx of bees interrupt your sunbathing and swimming fun this summer! The more bees you have in your pool area, the greater the chances that you, a loved one or a pet can get stung. Bee stings can be dangerous, especially for those who are allergic. Any steps you can take to protect yourself should be taken this summer to ensure that your pool-goers stay happy and healthy. 

    How to Control Bees at Your San Diego Swimming Pool

    At D-Tek Live Bee Removal, we care about safely and humanely removing bees. We don’t recommend using any harsh chemical products to kill bees, especially in or around your swimming pool. In any case, it can be a tough job to control bees at your pool. There’s actually no 100% foolproof method, trick or product that will do the job. 

    You may see a number of tricks online, such as planting mint or lemongrass around your pool area or using dryer sheets to repel honey bees. However, the best and most effective tactic is to help them find another water source. 

    What do bees use water for? 

    The honey bees are foraging for water to use back at the hive. Bees use water for a number of purposes. Water is used to cool the brood during the heat of the summer. It is also used by the nurse bees to help them produce the jelly that feeds the larvae. Water is also used in the winter to prevent the honey from crystallizing so it can be eaten by the bees. 

    Creating a New Water Source for Honey Bees 

    By creating a new source of water for the bees, you can help reduce the number of bees that come to forage water at your swimming pool. For the best results, it is advised to introduce the new water source early, before you open your swimming pool for the season. The goal of your new water source is to gradually draw the bees away from the pool while still protecting them and allowing them to pollinate as normal. 

    The water source can be as simple as a bucket or other container, a fountain or bird bath. Add a few sponges, sticks or rocks to the container to provide a place for the bees to land and hang out outside of the water. Whatever water source you are choosing, make sure that the water is not too fast-moving. Bees prefer calm water or a trickling stream! 

    Some homeowners choose to get a little more creative in making their alternate water source by building a bee pond. Large containers like barrels (or even half barrels) work really well for this purpose. In addition to the water, you can include other ingredients to help keep the pond running smoothly. Some recommended additions can include: 

    • Submerged plants (Elodea or Anarachis) 
    • Goldfish 
    • Mosquito fish
    • Aquatic snails 
    • Above-the-water plants (Salvinia, Azolla, Frogbit) 

    If you can’t seem to keep the bees away from your pool, you may want to call in the experts. The technicians at D-Tek Live Bee Removal know how to safely remove bees without harming them. They rehome the honey bees with local beekeepers so they can continue doing what they do best! 

    D-Tek Live Bee Removal for Your Honey Bee Needs This Summer 

    Summer is vibrant with flowers and insects of all kinds, including bees! Make sure you take the proper steps to keep your family and pets safe from painful, and potentially dangerous, bee stings. When you begin to notice bees visiting your swimming pool during the hot summer days, you can try to distract them with an alternate water source as described above. 

    Or, you can call D-Tek Live Bee Removal at 760-224-3040 to talk to one of our experts about how to best handle your bee situation! 

    The post How To Keep Bees Away From Your Swimming Pool appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


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