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Bee Blog D-Tek Live Bee Removal San Diego

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  • Dave Reed
  • April 30, 2019 01:43:06 AM
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A Little About Us

Our Apiarist has year of experience under his belt when it comes to bee behavior, beekeeping and bee removal. Ever wondered why bees swarm or what are the healing properties of honey? You'll find these answers and more in our Bee Blog.

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    Are Worker Bees the Busiest Bees?

    The worker honey bee gets its name because she will have many jobs throughout her lifetime. Without their efforts, the hive wouldn’t be able to function and pollination would not occur at the rate required to sustain our agricultural system. Every day of their lives, from birth to their death, worker bees have vital work… The post Are Worker Bees the Busiest Bees? appeared first on Live Bee...

    worker bee

    The worker honey bee gets its name because she will have many jobs throughout her lifetime. Without their efforts, the hive wouldn’t be able to function and pollination would not occur at the rate required to sustain our agricultural system. Every day of their lives, from birth to their death, worker bees have vital work to do. 

    We are willing to bet that there are many more jobs that these special ladies hold than you are even aware of! Let’s check out the long list of roles they will play immediately after emerging from their cells. 

    The Many (Many) Jobs of the Worker Bee 

    Undertakers (days 3-16)

    For a variety of reasons, adult bees and larvae die inside the hive. If left to decompose, they could create conditions perfect for infection and disease. One of the first jobs of a new worker bee is to remove dead bees and larvae from the hive so they can’t create unsafe conditions for the rest of the colony. 

    Drone Feeders (days 4-12) 

    During the same time as many of the worker bees are removing their dead brothers and sisters from the hive, other worker bees will be tending to the young drones. When they are new, drones cannot feed themselves and require the help of a capable sibling to get the job done. Once the drones are old enough, they obtain their own food from the hive’s honey supply. 

    Attendants to the Queen (days 7-12)

    The role of the queen is critical to the success of the hive. Without her reproductive efforts, the colony would not be able to support itself. To do this work, she needs the help of worker bees to feed, groom and clean up after her. The worker bees also help spread her pheromones throughout the hive, signaling to the rest of the colony that the queen is alive and well. 

    Pollen Packers (days 12-18)

    Older adult bees spend their days foraging for pollen and nectar. When they return to the colony with a full basket of pollen, a younger worker bee will collect the pollen and relocate it to an available cell in the hive. Here, it will be mixed with a dash of honey to keep it from going bad until it can be used as brood food for the next round of baby honey bees. 

    Honey Sealers (days 12-35)

    One of the most fascinating processes inside the hive is honey-making. A lot goes into it, and there are a few roles that worker bees will play to get the job done. Honey inside the cells must be sealed in to keep it fresh for the winter months. Worker bees will produce sheets of wax to seal the open cells and protect the valuable honey inside. 

    Honeycomb Builders (days 12-35) 

    The intricate hexagonal design of the honeycomb is a wonder of nature. Worker bees pass beeswax along a chain to bees whose job it is to build more honeycomb. The honeycomb is used to store pollen and honey and house developing eggs until they emerge as adults. 

    Fanners and Water Carriers (days 12-18) 

    Hives don’t have central air conditioning. Instead, worker bees take on the role of controlling the temperature inside the hive by flapping their wings vigorously near a water source. Some bees will work as fanners, while other bees will collect water from an outside source such as a pool, lake or bird bath.  

    Guards (days 18-21)

    Hives can be targets for critters who are looking for a quick meal. Older adult worker bees will work as guards stationed near the entrance of the hive to protect against infiltrators. Worker bees will use their stingers to defend their hive, even though just one sting results in their death. 

    Foragers (days 22-42) 

    Perhaps the most fun but tiring role a worker bee will hold is that of a forager. Forager bees are tasked with collecting pollen and nectar for use by the rest of the hive. When we see bees buzzing around flowers in the garden, we are seeing foragers in action. Even though they may not even be aware of it, these worker bees are responsible for pollination as they move from flower to flower. 

    The post Are Worker Bees the Busiest Bees? appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    5 Tips for Choosing the Right Bee Removal Company

    As one of the leaders in San Diego live bee removal, we know that it can be stressful and downright scary to find a honey bee swarm or hive on your property. At the first sign of an infestation, you have to make a decision about how to remove the hive and which company to… The post 5 Tips for Choosing the Right Bee Removal Company appeared first on Live Bee...

    myths about bees

    As one of the leaders in San Diego live bee removal, we know that it can be stressful and downright scary to find a honey bee swarm or hive on your property. At the first sign of an infestation, you have to make a decision about how to remove the hive and which company to choose. With a number of options out there, how do you choose the right bee removal company? 

    When it comes to bee removal, we know that you want to make the right choice for your family, property or workplace. If you need to hire a bee removal company in San Diego, check out this reference guide to help you make the best choice for your situation. 

    How to Choose the Right Bee Removal Company 

    Before committing to a bee removal company, it pays to do your research. A half-baked job can put people and property at risk. And when certain individuals have an allergy to bee venom, it can be much more than just a nuisance- it can be dangerous. Consider the following 5 tips when you start your search for the perfect honeybee removal services in your area. 

    Get a basic understanding of bee removal processes. 

    Although you don’t need to become an expert, it does help to have a basic understanding of common bee removal techniques. Not all bee removal companies are the same. Some use chemicals and pesticides that harm bees; while others use more humane methods of removal and relocation. 

    Consider the pros and cons of both methods before contracting with a company. In every case, you will find that choosing a company that specializes in live bee removal is a better choice. They don’t use pesticides that can kill bees in their process. Instead, they use a vacuum system that safely removes bees alive so they can be rehomed with a local beekeeper. 

    Be prepared with the right questions. 

    Just as you would with any service provider, be prepared to ask the customer service representative the right questions. Not only will this give you peace of mind, but it gives you the opportunity to see if they know their stuff. From the initial phone call, you can often tell if the company operates a professional business and what your overall customer experience might be like. Some questions to consider include: 

    • How quickly can you arrive at my property? 
    • How are your services priced? 
    • How long does a removal take? 
    • Do you offer free inspections and quotes? 
    • How do you handle any bee damage to my home during the removal process? 
    • How can you ensure that bees won’t come back to the same location in the future?  

    Check credentials, licenses and insurance. 

    When a business is performing a dangerous and difficult service at your home like bee removal, it is critical that they have the proper credentials, insurance and licenses to do the work. Professional liability insurance will protect both parties in the event that injury or damage is done in the course of the removal. Due to the dangerous nature of the job, always check to make sure that the company carries sufficient insurance. 

    Read reviews and testimonials. 

    One of the best ways to know if you can trust a bee removal company is to read their reviews. With the ease of online review sites, you can quickly read about the experiences of other customers from the comfort of your own home. Online customer review websites such as Angie’s List and Yelp are two popular choices. The Better Business Bureau can also give you insight into the overall reputation of a business.  

    Review their list of services. 

    Unlike some other home services, bee removal can require more than just a removal. Often, property owners require repair work and bee proofing services in order to have the job done completely. Bees can cause a great deal of damage to your structure. Accessing bee hives can be challenging, resulting in the need to remove pieces of drywall, stucco or roofing. 

    After a bee removal service, many home and business owners want to know that bees won’t return again anytime soon. Check to see if the bee removal company you choose offers bee proofing services with their removals. If not, you may be calling them again a month down the road. 

    San Diego Live Bee Removal Services 

    D-Tek Live Bee Removal wants to be your trusted partner for all of your San Diego bee removal, bee repair and bee proofing needs. Give us a call today to get a free inspection and quote. As a locally owned and operated company, we take pride in our integrity, transparent pricing and superior service. Call us at 760-224-3040 today to get started! 

    The post 5 Tips for Choosing the Right Bee Removal Company appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    Who’s Who in a Honey Bee Colony?

    A honey bee hive is bustling with activity. During the course of an average day, the members of the hive perform a multitude of jobs to help sustain the colony. From producing new bees and caring for the young to foraging for food and finding a suitable home when the colony grows too large, the… The post Who’s Who in a Honey Bee Colony? appeared first on Live Bee...

    bee removal services vista ca

    A honey bee hive is bustling with activity. During the course of an average day, the members of the hive perform a multitude of jobs to help sustain the colony. From producing new bees and caring for the young to foraging for food and finding a suitable home when the colony grows too large, the bees all band together to keep things running as they should. Although some might argue that the drones have it pretty easy, they still have their role to play! 

    There are three types of bees that can be found in a honey bee hive. Sometimes referred to as castes, honey bees all have their specific jobs, characteristics and life spans. Let’s learn more about the three types of honey bees in a bee hive.

    The Queen 

    They don’t call her the queen for nothing! While all bees play a role in the success of the hive, the queen bee may have the most important job – reproducing. The moniker is a little misleading, because even though she does hold an important role, she is not in charge of the other bees as you might expect. 

    The queen is the mother of the hive. She can lay about 2,000 eggs a day during the busiest bee season. To help her do this vital work, the worker bees tend to her every need; thus, the title of queen. In addition to laying eggs, the queen’s pheromones help maintain the status quo in the hive. Her scent signals to the other bees that she is alive and well, and that all is good in the colony. 

    The origin of the queen bee is quite an interesting story. Queens start off as a typical female egg. But instead of getting the normal diet of developing bees, would-be queens are fed a special diet of royal jelly. After about 16 days, the queen emerges as an adult bee and begins her search for drones for mating. More about drones later! After the mating ritual, the queen will store the sperm for her future use in a special organ called a spermatheca. 

    The Worker 

    The worker bees are perhaps the busiest bees in the hive. These ladies started off the same as the queen, except they weren’t fed the royal diet. They develop a few special characteristics that set them apart from the queen. For example, the worker bee has a barbed stinger that will stick inside a victim and tear from the bee. This means that workers can only sting once before they die. Queens, on the other hand, have a less-barbed stinger that allows them to sting multiple times if necessary. 

    Workers also have structures known as pollen baskets to help them accomplish their foraging work. The worker bee will store pollen in the basket as she goes from flower to flower, before eventually returning to the hive with a full capacity. 

    Worker bees play multiple roles within the hive throughout their lives. As they age, they continue along a path of responsibilities. Young bees will work in the nursery caring for the larvae and pupae. Then, they might progress to other jobs such as cleaners, aides to the queen, builders, undertakers, cooks and finally foragers.  

    The Drone 

    Last but not least, we have the drones. Drones are the male honey bees in the hive. They get less attention than their female counterparts, and perhaps it’s for good reason. They lead a generally “easy” life because their main job is to mate with a queen bee. Other than that, they primarily eat and take up space. If they don’t die after mating, they will eventually be kicked out of the hive as the colder months approach and the worker bees need to conserve their remaining resources. No use wasting honey on drones! 

    The honey bee hive is a complex system. In order for it to run as smoothly as it does, every bee must fulfill certain roles and responsibilities. The queen, workers and drones must band together to ensure the hive thrives and survives to see another season. 

    The post Who’s Who in a Honey Bee Colony? appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    The Early Life of a Worker Bee

    We focus a lot of our attention on the work that adult bees accomplish in their relatively short lives. From reproduction and pollination to making honey and building hives, honey bees are truly as busy as the old saying goes. One aspect of honey bee life that we spend less time discussing is their early… The post The Early Life of a Worker Bee appeared first on Live Bee...

    honeybee macro white flower

    We focus a lot of our attention on the work that adult bees accomplish in their relatively short lives. From reproduction and pollination to making honey and building hives, honey bees are truly as busy as the old saying goes. One aspect of honey bee life that we spend less time discussing is their early lives. 

    A worker bee goes from a teeny, tiny egg to an adult bee in about three weeks. During that time, a lot happens inside the cells that house developing honey bees. Let’s explore the three stages of worker bee development and learn more about how worker bees become the powerhouses we know them to be. 

    The Queen 

    But first, let’s talk a little about the queen. The primary role of the queen bee is reproduction. A queen bee can lay up to 2,000 eggs in a day. As you can imagine, that takes a lot of effort. To help her in her role, the worker bees feed and clean up after her so she can focus on her main responsibility. 

    When she’s ready, the queen will lay an egg in a small hexagonal structure made of beeswax called a cell. There are tens of thousands of cells in a typical beehive, most of which house developing workers and drones. 

    Egg Stage 

    The queen secures one egg in a cell before moving on to the next one. Worker bee eggs look a lot like tiny grains of rice. They are covered with a special, eggshell-like substance that houses the ovum, yolk and developing cells. As the cells develop, they cause the egg to tilt, eventually causing it to rest on its side, instead of the vertical position it started in. 

    In three days time, the “shell” begins to dissolve. While this might not sound impressive, it’s actually quite a novel process. Most insects will break through their shells, leaving remnants behind. Honey bees, on the other hand, dissolve their shells and reuse it for nutrients. 

    Larva Stage 

    We’ve now entered the larval stage! Honey bee larvae are still very small and worm-like, but no need to worry. Nursing bees will work hard to ensure that they have a continuous supply of food. In fact, all the larvae do is eat during this period of their lives. Their bodies have the parts necessary to take in food, but not much else. 

    In fact, the food they consume does not even exit their bodies yet, since they have not yet developed that part. Their closed intestine system serves a specific purpose. Because the larvae are not capable of removing their waste or transporting it out of their cells, it stays within their bodies until just before the pupal stage. This ensures that they don’t contaminate their food source. 

    The adult worker bees feed the larvae a diet of nutritious royal jelly for the first three days. After that, the larvae that will become your typical worker bees will cease getting royal jelly and begin a diet of honey and pollen. A larva that may be a future queen will continue to be fed the special royal jelly. With all of the feeding, it’s no wonder that larvae will grow to about 1500 times their original size during a 5-6 day period.  To accommodate the growing bee, it will molt several times during the larval stage. 

    Before moving to the final developmental stage, there is a two day period where the cell is capped by the adult worker bees so the developing larva can prepare for building its cocoon.  

    Pupa Stage 

    The final step before becoming a fully developed worker bee is the pupa stage. The larva will spin around inside the capped cell while releasing a silky substance until she is completely covered. Over the next 7-14 days in her cocoon, the bee will develop all the parts that look like the bees we know and love. When she is ready to emerge, she will break free through the beeswax and begin her life as an adult worker bee. 

    I think we can all agree that developing bees go through a lot in the course of three short weeks! If you’d like to learn more about the role of the adult worker bee, check out the article The Many Jobs of Worker Bees. 

    The post The Early Life of a Worker Bee appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    How to Teach Your Kids About Bees and Bee Safety

    The summertime is prime time for bee activity. Honeybees are hanging around flowers and plants to collect nectar and pollen to bring back to their family members in the hive. While bees are out and about, so are our kids. They are outside at play, running around the yard, climbing trees and enjoying sugary snacks… The post How to Teach Your Kids About Bees and Bee Safety appeared first on Live Bee...

    kids and bees

    The summertime is prime time for bee activity. Honeybees are hanging around flowers and plants to collect nectar and pollen to bring back to their family members in the hive. While bees are out and about, so are our kids. They are outside at play, running around the yard, climbing trees and enjoying sugary snacks on the porch. 

    While both bees and kids can live in harmony, many kids are fearful of bees and the potential for a nasty sting. They have been told that bees are mean little creatures that will sting you if you get too close. No wonder why kids run, swat or scream in fear at the sight of a bee! 

    One of the best ways to protect kids and honeybees is to educate children about bees early. Giving them information about bee behavior, the important role they play in our environment and how to safely interact with bees can help reduce the fear and keep everyone, including our honeybee friends, safe and happy. 

    Know Your Bees, Wasps and Other Stinging Insects 

    Honeybees are not the only stinging insects that your kids might encounter. Yellow jackets and hornets are two common types of wasps that are also buzzing around in the summer season. Teach your kids the differences among some of the most common bees and wasps, and give them the tools to identify each. For example, you might use the phrase “if it’s shiny and skinny, stay away” to help your kids recognize a wasp, and “if it’s fat and fuzzy, watch from afar” to identify a honeybee. 

    Of course, you can use whatever works for your kids. The point is that children should know that certain buzzing creatures will be more aggressive than others. Yellow jackets and hornets can be more aggressive, and continue to attack, even after an initial sting. Honeybees can only sting once. 

    A good rule of thumb for teaching your kids about bees and wasps: all are capable of stinging if they are threatened, but mostly they want to leave you alone. 

    This leads us into the second tip for teaching your kids about bees. Kids should be taught how to avoid bothering bees and what to do if they happen to encounter a bee or hive. 

    Safety Tips for Encountering Bees 

    • Don’t run around barefoot in the grass. Bees can be buzzing around between blades of grass. When they get startled by a human foot, they may sting in self-defense! 
    • Never swat at a bee because it is likely to make them upset. Instead, stay still and wait for the bee to move along. 
    • Bees like to live in hollowed out trees, on tree branches, under rarely used picnic tables or in the eaves of a structure like a garage or shed. These locations also make great places for kids to play. Teach your kids where bees are most likely to build their nests so they can avoid those areas, or at least proceed with caution. 
    • In general, do not put your hands in logs, holes or other structures when you see bees present. Bee activity could indicate a nearby hive. 

    Understand the Role That Bees Play in Making the Food We Eat

    Finally, instead of making bees the enemy, show your kids how amazing these little creatures truly are by sharing some fascinating facts. Your kids might be interested to know that much of the food that they eat comes to them because of the hard work of bees. They might also be interested in learning about the intricate way in which they build their hives, including all of the teamwork it takes to coordinate the structure. They may even love to learn how they make honey, while tasting some of the delicious stuff at the same time! 

    Learn more fascinating facts about honeybees here. 

    Keep Your Kids Safe from Swarms and Hives

    If you suspect that you have a swarm or hive on your property, it is still important that you keep kids at a safe distance. The best course of action is to call a local, reputable live bee removal company to come to your home and safely remove the bees, honeycomb and all remnants of the hive. 

    When you need professional live bee removal services in the San Diego area, call D-Tek Live Bee Removal right away for the best in safe, humane bee removal services. 

    The post How to Teach Your Kids About Bees and Bee Safety appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    3 Tips for Starting Out in Beekeeping

    If your interest in honeybees has grown to more than just a casual curiosity, you might find yourself considering becoming an amateur beekeeper. Beekeeping is a fascinating hobby and, for many people, it can be much more than that. It is a way to make a living.  While beekeeping is a fun way to spend… The post 3 Tips for Starting Out in Beekeeping appeared first on Live Bee...

    beekeeping

    If your interest in honeybees has grown to more than just a casual curiosity, you might find yourself considering becoming an amateur beekeeper. Beekeeping is a fascinating hobby and, for many people, it can be much more than that. It is a way to make a living. 

    While beekeeping is a fun way to spend time with bees, it can be very challenging! Beekeeping requires a lot of learning and a great deal of hard work. Experienced beekeepers agree that beginners will go through a lot of trial and error, frustration and confusion. But, the effort is all worth it! 

    If you are thinking about dabbling in beekeeping, we’ve compiled a few tips to help you get started on the right foot. 

    How to Get Started in Beekeeping 

    Find a beekeeping mentor.  

    One of the first things you should do is find a beekeeping mentor. Better yet, find multiple people you can refer to for advice when starting out on your own beekeeping journey. Experienced beekeepers can help you avoid some of the common pitfalls that many amateurs encounter. They can suggest the best equipment, refer you to other professionals and be there as a sounding board for your questions and frustrations.

    Forums are a great way to connect with your fellow beekeepers. You can also reach out to your local apiaries, live bee removal companies and other bee professionals who are dialed in to the honeybee community. 

    Educate yourself. 

    When starting out in beekeeping, there is a lot to learn. And just like any new endeavor, the more knowledge you have, the better equipped you will be for success. An amateur beekeeper should know about bee biology, including their life cycles, roles in the hive and behaviors. You should also research how to raise bees humanely and understand their important role in pollination and our agricultural system. 

    Luckily, there are tons of resources available (many of which are free) to begin to learn about beekeeping responsibly. Beekeeping blogs, forums and books can be great places to start to gather information. There are also plenty of reputable books available online or at the library to give you the strong foundational knowledge you need. Check your local area for beekeeping classes. They also offer virtual learning opportunities. 

    One of the best ways to learn about bees is to observe them in their natural habitat! By spending some time observing a colony, you can find out a lot about their behavior, patterns and schedules. A more experienced beekeeper may allow you to observe their hive and maybe even help you interpret their behavior! 

    Obtain the right equipment.

    Choosing the right equipment from the start can help you raise responsible and healthy bees. As a newbie, you will want to do your research and consult with your beekeeping mentors to decide what equipment is required. There are multiple hive styles and lots of protective equipment to consider, so getting help early will help you start up quickly. 

    You may be considering purchasing used equipment to save money, which is smart when you are starting a new hobby. However, be careful when purchasing second-hand equipment. Sometimes used equipment can have problems that can impact the health and safety of your hive. Have an experienced beekeeper take a look at any used equipment you are planning on using to ensure that it is in good condition. 

    Are you ready to start your beekeeping journey? 

    We hope these three tips help you get started in the wonderful hobby of beekeeping. Beekeeping can be challenging, but very rewarding. Getting the right education and finding a trusted mentor are vital for starting off right. And remember, you will make mistakes and that’s ok! All new beekeepers learn from their mistakes, so be patient with yourself and your bees. 

    The post 3 Tips for Starting Out in Beekeeping appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


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