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Bee Blog D-Tek Live Bee Removal San Diego

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  • April 30, 2019 01:43:06 AM
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Our Apiarist has year of experience under his belt when it comes to bee behavior, beekeeping and bee removal. Ever wondered why bees swarm or what are the healing properties of honey? You'll find these answers and more in our Bee Blog.

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    How Long Do Bees Live?

    How long do bees live? It might seem like a simple question, but it’s not as straightforward as you might think! The life span of a bee varies a lot depending on several factors. Some of the primary indicators of how long a particular bee will live include: Species of the bee Role of the… The post How Long Do Bees Live? appeared first on Live Bee...

    how long do honey bees live

    How long do bees live? It might seem like a simple question, but it’s not as straightforward as you might think! The life span of a bee varies a lot depending on several factors. Some of the primary indicators of how long a particular bee will live include:

    • Species of the bee
    • Role of the bee
    • Weather
    • Human interference
    • Disease
    • Pesticides
    • Parasites
    • Predators

    Even though we can’t give you an exact figure, we can identify the average life span of bees based on some of the factors above. Let’s examine one of the most common types of bee and answer the question, “How long do honey bees live?”

    How Long Do Honey Bees Live?

    Honey bees are social bees that live in colonies. Colonies operate like well-oiled machines with every bee assigned to a specific role. That’s pretty amazing when you think about how large some colonies can get. Honey bee colonies can reach upwards of 80,000 bees. 

    There are three roles that a honey bee can have in a hive: queen, worker or drone. As we said earlier, one factor that impacts the life span of a bee is the role they play.

    The Queen Honey Bee

    She isn’t called the queen for nothing! If all goes according to plan, a queen bee can live between 3 and 5 years. Since her primary job is to reproduce, she never leaves the hive and remains sheltered from the typical “wear and tear” that the other bees experience. By staying inside the hive, she stays more protected from predators and disease.

    Over time, the queen will begin to produce fewer eggs and her pheromones won’t be quite as attractive as they once were. When the other bees sense this change, they will kill off the queen and begin to raise a new one. The chosen larvae will begin their diet of royal jelly until a new queen is crowned.

    The Worker Honey Bee

    Most bees in the hive are worker bees. In fact, there are usually around 50,000 to 60,000 workers in a large colony, performing jobs like foraging, defending the hive, caring for the queen and feeding the larvae. 

    The life span of a worker bee depends on when it was born. Workers born in the spring and summer will live for 6 to 8 weeks. Those born in the fall will live longer, about 4 to 6 months. What accounts for this big difference?

    Summer-born worker bees have a lot of work to do right from the start. After working inside the hive for the first few weeks of their lives, worker bees will head outside of the hive, flying from flower to flower to collect pollen and nectar for the rest of the hive. They are also responsible for taking care of the brood. The intensity of the work they do takes a toll on them and, ultimately, is the reason for their rather short lives.

    Autumn bee babies, on the other hand, stay inside the hive for the winter. They have no brood to care for and no foraging to accomplish. Their only job is to huddle around the queen to keep her safe and warm. Once spring has sprung, these worker bees will begin their foraging duties.

    The Drone Honey Bee

    The drone has the shortest life span of all the honey bees. They live an average of 3 weeks to 3 months. Their brief lives can be explained by examining their role in the hive. Drones have one responsibility – to mate with a queen. Oh, and eat.

    During the mating process, the reproductive organs of the drone are torn from their bodies, and they die. The drones that did not mate in the spring and summer months will remain in the hive – but not for long. Once the winter hits, the worker bees will kick the drones out of the hive so they don’t have to be fed. Unable to support themselves, they die.

    As you can see, honey bees can live anywhere from 3 weeks to 5 years, depending on their role in the hive. Even though we can estimate the average life span of honey bees, many external factors could end the life of a bee prematurely. 

    The lives of bees never cease to amaze us!

    The post How Long Do Bees Live? appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    Origin Stories: The Bee’s Knees and Busy as a Bee

    Bees play such an important role in our everyday lives that it is no wonder that they also play a role in the English language. If you think about it, there are tons of common idioms that involve the bee. Have you ever wondered how these sayings came to be? In today’s post, we are… The post Origin Stories: The Bee’s Knees and Busy as a Bee appeared first on Live Bee...

    common bee phrases honey bee

    Bees play such an important role in our everyday lives that it is no wonder that they also play a role in the English language. If you think about it, there are tons of common idioms that involve the bee. Have you ever wondered how these sayings came to be? In today’s post, we are going to explore the meanings and origins of two of our favorite bee-related sayings: The Bee’s Knees and Busy as a Bee. Here we go! 

    The Bee’s Knees

    During the 1920s, Flappers always looked like they were having one heck of a good time. And we can certainly see that through some of the rather whimsical language that they developed during that period in history. There was a big trend of using nonsensical, playful sayings that made reference to various animals and their “distinguishing characteristics.” 

    The cat’s pajamas, the monkey’s eyebrows and the snake’s hips were all part of the common vernacular during this time. The phrases were used to describe something wonderful, admirable or amazingly excellent. So, you might say something like this: When it comes to live bee removal, D-Tek Live Bee Removal is the bee’s knees. 

    According to one article, the phrase originally referred to something small and insignificant back in the late 18th century. Later, it came to mean something rare or delicious. Then in the early 1920s, it came to mean what we know and still use to some degree today. The Bees Knees was even a popular song in 1923.  

    Still other explanations abound, none of them directly supported by evidence. Some believe that the phrase came about because of the way in which bees bring pollen back to their hives. The pollen is collected and stored in sacs on their legs to keep it safe while they make a beeline back to the hive… see what we did there? 

    Proponents of this origin story allege that the phrase refers to the valuable, wonderful and amazingly excellent pollen that can be found on the legs (and near the “knees”) of the bees. Others believe it to be a reference to an actual person – Bee Jackson. Bee was a famous dancer during this time period known for bringing the popular dance The Charleston to the mainstream. Perhaps The Bee’s Knees actually refers very literally to the knees of Bee Jackson as they uniquely and wonderfully moved about on the stage. 

    No matter where the phrase originated from, it’s still not too uncommon for it to be used in the modern day English language. Sure, it’s rare to hear people use the saying, but we all know that bringing back retro slang is the bee’s knees. 

    Busy as a Bee

    This bee saying is one that most of us have heard or may have even said a time or two in our lives. The busy-ness of bees plays a central role in many children’s book and cartoons. So, the saying Busy as a Bee seems to make sense. But is it really true that bees are busy? 

    One of the earliest sources that makes reference to the phrase is Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. Written in about 1392, Chaucer compared women to busy bees. It seems that the phrase stuck from here and has been used for centuries to describe someone or something that works hard and is always very busy. 

    If you believe all the hype, bees are some of the busiest and most industrious species out there. In reality, although some bees do keep quite busy during the day, the amount of work and the types of duties they perform varies greatly from bee to bee.  

    The male drones are perhaps the “laziest” of the honey bees, only leaving the hive for a short time each day. The queen, although very busy laying up to 2,000 eggs a day, doesn’t leave the hive at all and relies on the worker bees to feed her and remove her waste. As their name suggests, the worker bees are probably the busiest of them all, but even these bees take plenty of rest in the evenings and in cold weather. 

    With all of this considered, we think it’s fair to say that bees are truly busy little creatures and so the phrase holds up! 

    What are your favorite bee-related idioms? Check back to our blog next month for more of our favorite bee phrases! 

    The post Origin Stories: The Bee’s Knees and Busy as a Bee appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    Get to Know Your Common Bees and Wasps

    If you’ve spent any time outside over the last few months, you’ve probably seen plenty of bees and wasps flying around. This time of year they come out in droves and can cause quite a panic for humans, homeowners and business owners. Bee or wasp infestations can cause structural damage and their stings can be… The post Get to Know Your Common Bees and Wasps appeared first on Live Bee...

    hornet

    If you’ve spent any time outside over the last few months, you’ve probably seen plenty of bees and wasps flying around. This time of year they come out in droves and can cause quite a panic for humans, homeowners and business owners. Bee or wasp infestations can cause structural damage and their stings can be painful.

    But just because it looks like a honey bee, doesn’t mean it is a honey bee! There are a few common flying creatures that often get mistaken for the honey bee: the bumble bee, the yellow jacket and the hornet. We think it’s important to know how to identify these commonly seen bees and wasps so you can better protect yourself and your family from painful stings or worse. 

    Let’s talk about some of the most common bees and wasps that you are likely to see around your home and how to tell the difference between them all. 

    How much do you know about honey bees, bumble bees, yellow jackets and hornets? Could you identify each one by looks alone? What would you do if you encountered any of these creatures? 

    How to Identify Common Bees and Wasps 

    When you know the type of insect you are dealing with, you can be more equipped to take the right action. One of the most important reasons to learn about bees and wasps is to protect people and pets from stings. Allergic reactions to bee or wasp stings can be very dangerous, especially if the victim has suffered multiple stings. 

    There are two main ways that we can identify a bee or wasp: the appearance of the insect and the location of its nest. Let’s explore! 

    Bees 

    honey bee

    Honey Bee (Apis)

    Size: .35 to .78 inches in length 

    Coloring: Black, golden brown and yellow bands

    Stinger Type: Barbed, found on workers and queens, can only sting once

    Aggression:  Yes, when provoked and when protecting the hive and queen

    Pollination: Yes, a variety of crops such as apples, cranberries and broccoli

    Social or Solitary: Social, colonies up to 80,000 bees

    Nest: Trees, eaves, rock crevices; Made of beeswax

     

    bumble-bee

    Bumble Bee (Bombus)

    Size: 1 to 1 ½ inches in length

    Coloring: Fuzzy yellow and black hair, including on abdomen

    Stinger Type: Smooth, found on workers and queens; Can sting multiple times 

    Aggression:  Yes, but rare unless provoked 

    Pollination: Yes, a variety of flowers and crops, especially tomatoes

    Social or Solitary: Social, colonies averaging 15 to 100 bees  

    Nest Type: Ground nests, smaller than honey bees 

     

    Wasps

    yellow-jacket

    Yellow Jacket (Vespula or Dolichovespula)

    Size: .5 to .75 inches in length 

    Coloring: Black and yellow, sometimes black and white; Smooth appearance 

    Stinger Type: Lance-like, barbed; Can sting multiple times 

    Aggression:  Yes, very territorial and are known to chase humans 

    Pollination: Yes, but not very efficient due to lack of fuzzy hair 

    Social or Solitary: Social, colonies up to 20,000 wasps 

    Nest Type: Paper-like, gray in color; Commonly found underground or in walls

     

    hornet

    Hornet (Vespa) 

    Size: Up to 2 inches in length  

    Coloring: Striped white and black body

    Stinger Type: Not barbed 

    Aggression: Yes, very painful stings; Could be lethal if allergic to hornet venom

    Pollination: Yes, a variety of crops and flowers

    Social or Solitary: Social, colonies averaging 700 workers 

    Nest Type: Papery, made from chewed wood; Football-shaped; Found in branches, inside trees, man-made structures

     

    Do you have bees or wasps on your property? 

    Many San Diego homeowners call us because they think they have a bee or wasp infestation – but they aren’t sure which one! At D-Tek Live Bee Removal, we are happy to come out to your property and fairly assess the situation. Our team will then suggest the best course of action for your unique needs. 

    When you work with us, we use safe and effective live bee removal techniques that keep the honey bees safe and sound throughout the process. Why is this important? Because we want to help protect honey bees so they can continue to pollinate our crops. 

     

    The specialists at D-Tek Live Bee Removal are experts in bee removal. They know bees and wasps, and how to handle them! 

    Do you need bee removal in San Diego or San Diego County? Give the team at D-Tek Live Bee Removal a call today for a free quote and a consultation with one of our live bee removal experts.  

    The post Get to Know Your Common Bees and Wasps appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    What You Should Know About Mining Bees

    Have you ever noticed bees going in and out of a hole in the ground? If so, you’ve seen mining bees! Many people don’t know much about these ground bees. In fact, most people mistake them for honey bees or wasps.  However, mining bees include over 1,300 species of bees in the genus Andrena, so… The post What You Should Know About Mining Bees appeared first on Live Bee...

    mining bees

    Have you ever noticed bees going in and out of a hole in the ground? If so, you’ve seen mining bees! Many people don’t know much about these ground bees. In fact, most people mistake them for honey bees or wasps. 

    However, mining bees include over 1,300 species of bees in the genus Andrena, so they are much more common than you might think. We think it’s time to give mining bees their time in the spotlight! Let’s address some of the most commonly asked questions about mining bees so we can learn more about these fascinating creatures. 

    What You Should Know About Mining Bees

    They are solitary bees. 

    Bees in the genus Andrena are solitary bees which means that they do not belong to a colony of bees. They do not have a large hive full of precious honey and a queen bee to protect. Female mining bees do all of the work throughout their life cycles. They build their own underground nests, lay the eggs and collect the nectar and pollen for the hatched eggs.

    They are non-aggressive. 

    The idea of stepping on an underground nest sends many people into a state of panic, but mining bees are very docile. In fact, it would be extremely rare to be stung by a mining bee. The majority of the bees that you see hovering above a ground nest are males who do not even have stingers. The female stingers are quite small and would not cause much pain to humans. 

    They have a relatively simple life cycle. 

    Female mining bees will build their nests in the ground and then fill the cells with nectar and pollen. After laying her eggs, the female bee will die, leaving the eggs with the food source to help them develop into adult bees. In the early spring, the new mining bees leave the nest to mate and begin the process over again.  

    They are picky pollinators. 

    Mining bees are oligolectic which means that they only gather pollen from certain plant species. Some even collect pollen from only one plant species! These bees are called monolectic.  

    They will not damage your yard. 

    A lot of homeowners might be concerned that all of these underground nests will cause damage to their yards and plants. In fact, mining bees are some of our earliest pollinators and help garden plants and flowers flourish. Many people even agree that mining bees act as excellent yard aerators! Although the dirt mounds and holes might look unappealing, these underground bees won’t cause destruction to your yard. 

    What to Do If You Find Mining Bees on Your Property

    One of the biggest questions we get when it comes to mining bees is “How do we get rid of them?” The best answer is simple: just let them be! 

    Mining bees are not usually a danger to people, pets or property. There have even been countless reports of people walking barefoot in grass that is full of mining bees without getting stung once. And because these bees have a relatively short lifespan, they are usually only buzzing around for about 4 to 6 weeks. 

    If you believe that they are causing damage or harm, never use pesticides to rid your home of the problem. Pesticides are unsafe for people and will kill other types of beneficial bees and insects. It is also never recommended that you try to dig them up or cover the entrances to their nests. The best course of action is to call professional bee removal specialists who can diagnose the issue and suggest the best solution for your situation. 

    Have More Questions About Mining Bees or Honey Bees? 

    We love helping our customers in the San Diego area learn more about bees. If you have more questions about mining bees, honey bees or any type of bee, give our specialists a call! D-Tek Live Bee Removal has been in the live bee removal business for almost 15 years. Our team has some of the best bee removal pros in the area that know how to assess your bee issue and recommend the best and most cost-effective solutions.

    Do you need help ridding your home or business of bees? Contact us today to discuss our professional live bee removal, bee removal repair and bee proofing services for residents of San Diego and the surrounding communities.  

    The post What You Should Know About Mining Bees appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    3 Myths About Bees Debunked

    How much do you know about bees? As prominent figures in our culture, we can find images of bees in children’s books, on cereal boxes and as mascots to sports teams. With bees being so prevalent, you’d think we’d all know everything there is to know about them. In reality, most of us don’t know… The post 3 Myths About Bees Debunked appeared first on Live Bee...

    myths about bees

    How much do you know about bees? As prominent figures in our culture, we can find images of bees in children’s books, on cereal boxes and as mascots to sports teams. With bees being so prevalent, you’d think we’d all know everything there is to know about them. In reality, most of us don’t know as much as we think we do! 

    There are a lot of myths out there about bees and what they do and why. And that’s understandable – with more than 20,000 species of bees on the planet, there is so much variation among bee species. Many of the common misconceptions about bees persist because, when most of us think of bees, we are all thinking about the same bee – the honey bee. 

    Today we are going to take a look at three of the most common myths about bees and set the record straight. Here we go! 

    3 Common Myths About Bees 

    Myth 1: All bees make honey. 

    When most people think of bees, they think of honey. But, you might be surprised to learn that most bees don’t actually make honey. Honey is only produced by social species of bees that live in colonies. They make the honey to feed the brood and queen during the winter months. 

    Most bee species are solitary, meaning that they do not live in colonies or in hives with hundreds or thousands of other bees. They use nectar and pollen to make the food they need to keep their young alive. 

    And here’s another interesting fact: there are some species of wasps that also make honey! 

    Myth 2: Bees don’t sting at night. 

    Many people believe that bees can’t see at night or that they simply aren’t able to sting in the dark. Although we might hope this is true, the fact is that honey bees are perfectly capable of stinging you at night. The reason many people believe this myth is because bee stings at night are relatively rare. 

    In the evening, honey bees typically retire to their nests. They stop gathering pollen and nectar and rest in preparation for the next day’s work. The cooler temperatures keep the bees in the hive or clustered around it until the next day. With the bees tucked away in their home, they are far less likely to sting humans at night. However, if you decide to bother the nest, they will not hesitate to sting, so be careful! 

    Myth 3: Bees are dangerous. 

    There are a lot of people out there who are seriously afraid of bees. The sight of a hive or swarm is enough to send them into a panic. The reality is that most bees are completely harmless when left alone. And unless you are allergic to bee venom, a bee sting is just a painful and temporary nuisance. In fact, some research suggests that most adults can sustain more than 1,000 bee stings without any serious, long-term consequences. 

    Even though bees are generally quite docile, it’s still smart to let the professionals handle any beehives or swarms on your property. When bees sense that their hive and queen may be threatened, they will not hesitate to attack. Expert bee removal specialists will have the right skills and equipment to get the job done safely. 

    Facts About Honey Bees

    We hope you learned a little more about these amazing creatures and we encourage you to share your new knowledge with others. It will be impossible to learn everything there is to know about bees and honey, but a little knowledge goes a long way in protecting and preserving bees. 

    Do you have a bee situation at your home or business? Give us a call! We love to help our customers learn more about bees and keep their properties and families safe from bee infestations. When you have a swarm or hive on your property, call D-Tek Live Bee Removal for professional live bee removal. We specialize in removing bees using natural processes and without the use of chemicals. 

    D-Tek Live Bee Removal: live bee removal, bee removal repairs and bee proofing services in San Diego County. 

    Is a beehive causing a problem on your property? Call the experts at D-Tek Live Bee Removal today. 

    The post 3 Myths About Bees Debunked appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    How to Keep Kids Safe from Bee Stings

    Summer means spending time outdoors for many families. Picnics, barbeques and baseball games are some of the highlights of the season. While there is a lot of fun to be had for kids, there are also some increased risks of getting an injury. Perhaps one of the most common types of injuries that children experience… The post How to Keep Kids Safe from Bee Stings appeared first on Live Bee...

    The summer means spending time outdoors for many families. Picnics, barbeques and baseball games are some of the highlights of the season. While there is a lot of fun to be had for kids, there are also some increased risks of getting an injury. Perhaps one of the most common types of injuries that children experience in the summer is bee stings. Bee and wasp stings aren’t fun for people of any age. But for children, a sting can be extra unpleasant. Kids can be shocked at how painful a sting from a little bee can actually be! Parents need to be extra vigilant if their child is allergic to bee stings because of the danger of very serious health issues. When Your Child Gets Stung by a Bee Children won’t always know how serious a bee sting can be, especially if they’ve never been stung before. Adults should help children to understand how to be safe around bees and what to do if they happen to get stung. Educating children before an incident occurs is the best way to keep them safe and happy this summer. Here are some common questions kids may have about bee stings as well as tips for how to best handle them when they happen. How do I know if I have a bee sting? There are a few tell-tale signs that you have been the victim of a bee or wasp sting. Usually the area stung will get hot and develop a red bump. It may also begin to itch. If you notice any of these symptoms, you should take it seriously. An allergic reaction to a bee sting can have dangerous consequences. How will I know if I’m allergic to bees? Typical allergic reactions to bee stings include: Hives Nausea Difficulty breathing Dizziness Do all bees sting? Male bees do not have stingers so they cannot sting you. If you’ve been stung by a honey bee, then you have been stung by a female bee. Their stingers have unique barbed hooks that anchor the stinger in the skin after a sting. The stinger will get stuck in the skin as the bee flies away. Because of this, honey bees can only sting you once! Other bees and wasps may be able to sting more than once because their stingers do not have this barbed feature. What should I do if I get a bee sting? The first thing a child should do if they have been stung by a bee is tell an adult. For a child that is not having an allergic reaction, the sting can be taken care of at home. If you think a reaction is occurring or if the swelling increases, contact the doctor or seek medical attention right away. EpiPens are a common emergency treatment for those who are allergic to bee stings. Honey bees will leave their stingers in the skin. The first thing to do is to carefully remove the stinger and wash the area with gentle soap and water. Reduce pain and swelling by applying ice directly to the sting. Administer a pain reliever or antihistamine if the pain or swelling is severe. Apply a baking soda and water mixture to the sting to reduce itchiness. How can I avoid bee stings? For the most part, bees don’t mean us any harm. They just want to go about their day buzzing from flower to flower. Bees will usually leave you alone unless they are disturbed. The best thing to do is leave bees and wasps alone. If you have a large swarm or hive on your property, you should contact a professional live be removal company to safely remove the bees from the premises. Never attempt to remove the bees on your own – that’s the easiest way to get stung! Avoid sweet smelling lotions or perfumes. Don’t wear bright or floral clothing. Cover food and soda cans. Wear shoes in grassy areas. San Diego Live Bee Removal – D-Tek Live Bee Removal No one wants to get stung by a bee or wasp. If you notice that you have a hive on your property, make the call to D-Tek Live Bee Removal right away. Bee hives can cause property damage to your home and the potential for nasty bee stings. And when you have children and pets to protect, you need to ensure that the bees are handled by professionals. For all of your live bee removal, bee removal repair or bee proofing needs in San Diego and San Diego county, contact the team at D-Tek Live Bee Removal for your free quote today.

    Summer means spending time outdoors for many families. Picnics, barbeques and baseball games are some of the highlights of the season. While there is a lot of fun to be had for kids, there are also some increased risks of getting an injury. Perhaps one of the most common types of injuries that children experience in the summer is bee stings. 

    Bee and wasp stings aren’t fun for people of any age. But for children, a sting can be extra unpleasant. Kids can be shocked at how painful a sting from a little bee can actually be! Parents need to be extra vigilant if their child is allergic to bee stings because of the danger of very serious health issues. 

    When Your Child Gets Stung by a Bee 

    Children won’t always know how serious a bee sting can be, especially if they’ve never been stung before. Adults should help children to understand how to be safe around bees and what to do if they happen to get stung. Educating children before an incident occurs is the best way to keep them safe and happy this summer. Here are some common questions kids may have about bee stings as well as tips for how to best handle them when they happen.   

    How do I know if I have a bee sting? 

    There are a few tell-tale signs that you have been the victim of a bee or wasp sting. Usually, the area stung will get hot and develop a red bump. It may also begin to itch. If you notice any of these symptoms, you should take it seriously. An allergic reaction to a bee sting can have dangerous consequences. 

    How will I know if I’m allergic to bees?  

    Typical allergic reactions to bee stings include: 

    • Hives 
    • Nausea
    • Difficulty breathing 
    • Dizziness 

    Do all bees sting? 

    Male bees do not have stingers so they cannot sting you. If you’ve been stung by a honey bee, then you have been stung by a female bee. Their stingers have unique barbed hooks that anchor the stinger in the skin after a sting. The stinger will get stuck in the skin as the bee flies away. Because of this, honey bees can only sting you once! Other bees and wasps may be able to sting more than once because their stingers do not have this barbed feature. 

    What should I do if I get a bee sting? 

    The first thing a child should do if they have been stung by a bee is tell an adult. For a child that is not having an allergic reaction, the sting can be taken care of at home. If you think a reaction is occurring or if the swelling increases, contact the doctor or seek medical attention right away. EpiPens are a common emergency treatment for those who are allergic to bee stings. 

    • Honey bees will leave their stingers in the skin. The first thing to do is to carefully remove the stinger and wash the area with gentle soap and water. 
    • Reduce pain and swelling by applying ice directly to the sting. 
    • Administer a pain reliever or antihistamine if the pain or swelling is severe.
    • Apply a baking soda and water mixture to the sting to reduce itchiness.  

    How can I avoid bee stings? 

    For the most part, bees don’t mean us any harm. They just want to go about their day buzzing from flower to flower. Bees will usually leave you alone unless they are disturbed. The best thing to do is to leave bees and wasps alone. If you have a large swarm or hive on your property, you should contact a professional live bee removal company to safely remove the bees from the premises. Never attempt to remove the bees on your own – that’s the easiest way to get stung! 

    • Avoid sweet-smelling lotions or perfumes.
    • Don’t wear bright or floral clothing. 
    • Cover food and soda cans. 
    • Wear shoes in grassy areas. 

    San Diego Live Bee Removal – D-Tek Live Bee Removal 

    No one wants to get stung by a bee or wasp. If you notice that you have a hive on your property, make the call to D-Tek Live Bee Removal right away. Beehives can cause property damage to your home and the potential for nasty bee stings. And when you have children and pets to protect, you need to ensure that the bees are handled by professionals. 

    For all of your live bee removal, bee removal repair or bee proofing needs in San Diego and San Diego County, contact the team at D-Tek Live Bee Removal for your free quote today. 

    The post How to Keep Kids Safe from Bee Stings appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


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