Blogging Fusion Blog Directory the #1 blog directory and oldest directory online.

Bee Blog D-Tek Live Bee Removal San Diego

Home Bee Blog D-Tek Live Bee Removal San Diego

Bee Blog D-Tek Live Bee Removal San Diego

Rated: 0.00 / 5 | 143 listing views Bee Blog D-Tek Live Bee Removal San Diego Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

United-States

 

General Audience

  • 1-760-224-3040
  • Dave Reed
  • April 30, 2019 05:43:06 AM
SHARE THIS PAGE ON:

A Little About Us

Our Apiarist has year of experience under his belt when it comes to bee behavior, beekeeping and bee removal. Ever wondered why bees swarm or what are the healing properties of honey? You'll find these answers and more in our Bee Blog.

Listing Details

  • Website Tags:
  • Featured Blog Expires: 2020-04-30 01:43:06 (341 days left)
  • Listing Statistics

    Add ReviewMe Button

    Review Bee Blog D-Tek Live Bee Removal San Diego at Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

    Add SEO Score Button

    My Blogging Fusion Score

    Google Adsense™ Share Program

    Alexa Web Ranking: 11,773,026

    Alexa Ranking - Bee Blog D-Tek Live Bee Removal San Diego

    Subscribe to Bee Blog D-Tek Live Bee Removal San Diego

    California Bees: Bumblebees and Carpenter Bees

    How many species of bees can be found in California? If you guessed over one thousand, you are correct! There are more than one thousand species of bees in our state. Most of them are considered solitary bees, ones that do not live together in colonies. The rest are considered bumblebees.  There are several species… The post California Bees: Bumblebees and Carpenter Bees appeared first on Live Bee...

    bumble-bee

    How many species of bees can be found in California? If you guessed over one thousand, you are correct! There are more than one thousand species of bees in our state. Most of them are considered solitary bees, ones that do not live together in colonies. The rest are considered bumblebees. 

    There are several species that are much more common than the others: bumblebees, European honeybees, Africanized honeybees and carpenter bees. Today we will talk about two of the species that are often mistaken for each other: bumblebees and carpenter bees.  

    Let’s learn more about these species so you can better identify them this summer.   

    How to Identify Bumblebees and Carpenter Bees  

    Bumblebees (genus: Bombus)

    There are 49 species of bumblebees living in the United States. They get their name from the noise they make when inside a flower! Bumblebees usually live in nests of about 15 to 100 bees. But they don’t make their homes in the beehives that we usually see hanging from branches or in the eaves of a roof. Bumblebees make their nests in the ground in unused holes from mammals or in other low-lying locations. 

    Bumblebees pollinate a variety of flowers and are specifically beneficial for tomato farmers. And although they can sting, bumblebees rarely do. But be careful – if you handle them or get too close to their nest, they can become aggressive, stinging you several times. 

    Bumblebees are twice as large as honeybees. They have thick black and yellow hair covering their bodies and look sort of fuzzy. When collecting pollen, they actually use the sound of their wings to transfer the pollen from the flower to their bodies and into the pollen baskets that are found on their legs. 

    Bumblebee Stats: 

    • Size: 1 to 1 ½ inches in length 
    • Hair: fuzzy yellow and black hair, including on abdomen 
    • Sting: yes, but rare unless provoked
    • Pollination: yes, a variety of flowers and crops, especially tomatoes 
    • Colony Size: 15 to 100 bumblebees 

    Carpenter Bees (genus: Xylocopa) 

    Carpenter bees are known to be docile yet destructive. These bees get their name because they make holes in wood in order to build their nests. You may commonly see these holes in dead wood and wooden structures like sheds. A telltale sign of a carpenter bee nest? A pile of sawdust under a perfectly drilled hole! 

    Carpenter bees also have another behavior that is not liked by many. Due to their size (they are about 1 inch in length), they cannot fit into many smaller flowers to gather nectar. But instead of moving on to larger food sources, they chew tiny holes in the side of the flowers, removing the nectar for their meal. The downside to this? They are not participating in pollination by sneaking the nectar out of the side door! 

    Carpenter bees look very similar to bumblebees, which is why they are often confused. They have the same thick black and yellow hair; however, carpenter bees do not have any hair on their abdomens. Instead, they have a black and shiny abdomen. 

    Carpenter Bee Stats: 

    • Size: about 1 inch in length 
    • Hair: fuzzy yellow and black hair, no hair on the abdomen 
    • Sting: females can sting but rarely unless provoked; males do not have stingers 
    • Pollination: yes, a variety of crops such as tomato and eggplant 
    • Colony Size: solitary bees, they do not live or work in colonies  

     

    Hopefully, you can now tell the difference between a bumblebee and a carpenter bee. Although they look similar, the appearance of their abdomens is the key to telling these bees apart. Both of these species of bees are harmless unless provoked.

    If you feel that your bees are causing a nuisance or safety hazard, be sure to call the professionals at D-Tek Live Bee Removal rather than attempting to remove them yourself. The expert bee removal technicians at D-Tek Live Bee Removal can assess your bee situation and recommend the best course of action.

    Call us today for a FREE quote! Our team is standing by to help you manage your bee problem safely and humanely. 

    The post California Bees: Bumblebees and Carpenter Bees appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    3 Fun Facts About the Queen Bee

    When we think “queen bee,” we often think of the one in charge or the boss of a situation. And although this term is used pretty often in pop culture, it’s actually not quite the truth. The queen bee is a unique and extremely important member of the beehive. But she isn’t really in charge… The post 3 Fun Facts About the Queen Bee appeared first on Live Bee...

    facts about queen bees

    When we think “queen bee,” we often think of the one in charge or the boss of a situation. And although this term is used pretty often in pop culture, it’s actually not quite the truth. The queen bee is a unique and extremely important member of the beehive. But she isn’t really in charge at all! 

    The queen bee is truly fascinating and we’re excited to share some of our favorite facts about this special bee. Did you know that a queen can lay up to 1,500 eggs a day? And that’s not even the most exciting thing about the queen bee!

    3 Fun Facts About the Queen Bee

    Queen bees change in size.

    The queen bee is the largest bee in the colony. Her abdomen is long compared to the drones and worker bees because it contains ovaries that allow her to accomplish her most important job. Young queens look much like worker bees. However, as the queen ages, her abdomen will grow in preparation for her new role.

    In the springtime when the colony is preparing to swarm, queens will shrink in size. Usually, worker bees will feed the queen to keep her healthy and strong for her egg-laying duties. However, prior to swarming, the worker bees will begin to feed her less. 

    Why? Because this is one of the very few times that the queen will need to take flight. In fact, the typical queen honey bee will only leave the hive to mate and swarm. Her decreased bodyweight will help make the flight to a new hive easier and safer for the queen. 

    Queen bees fight for their roles.  

    Typically, worker bees don’t make just one queen. They usually make more than one in order to increase the odds of raising a healthy queen bee. But, there can only be one queen. Rival queen bees will fight each other until only one remains. Queen bees use their smooth stingers to kill their rivals.

    The good news for us is that queens almost never sting humans. The primary reason is that they rarely leave the hive and so they don’t come in contact with humans very often. Another interesting fact is that worker bees (whose job it is to protect the colony) have barbed stingers. This feature allows the stinger to stick securely inside our skin, letting the bee release the stinger and venom into its victim.

    Queen bees are recognized by their hive mates.

    Queen bees release pheromones which are unique odors that help bees communicate. The queen will release her pheromones throughout the colony so that the workers can recognize her and communicate with her.

    Much of what happens in the hive is controlled by pheromones. As a queen bee ages, she begins to release fewer pheromones and produce fewer eggs. Once this starts to happen, the colony will make a new queen as her replacement.

    The inhabitants of beehives are so interesting due to the complex ways in which bees communicate and the unique role that each bee plays. The queen is undoubtedly special within the hive. In fact, she spends the majority of her life inside the hive laying eggs. She doesn’t even feed or clean herself – the workers do it for her! 

    D-Tek Live Bee Removal in San Diego County

    We are fascinated by bees and love sharing our knowledge with others who are interested in learning about what goes on in their resident beehive or swarm. If you own a home or business that has a bee problem, it’s important that you contact professional technicians who use safe and humane methods of live bee removal.

    D-Tek Live Bee Removal has a reputation in San Diego for being experts in the fields of bee removal and bee repair. When you need the best, you’ve got to call the professionals at D-Tek Live Bee Removal. 

    The post 3 Fun Facts About the Queen Bee appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    What is Honey and How Is It Made?

    We all know (and love) honey. It’s the perfect addition to our tea and oatmeal and it’s even great on its own as a healthy and sweet snack. Honey is also commonly used as a facial or hair mask, known for its exceptional moisturizing and antibacterial qualities. Honey has been around for quite a while!… The post What is Honey and How Is It Made? appeared first on Live Bee...

    what is honey

    We all know (and love) honey. It’s the perfect addition to our tea and oatmeal and it’s even great on its own as a healthy and sweet snack. Honey is also commonly used as a facial or hair mask, known for its exceptional moisturizing and antibacterial qualities.

    Honey has been around for quite a while! One of the first fossilized honeycombs dates back to about 3 million years ago. There are even records of humans removing honey from a hive in Spain dating back to about 15,000 years ago.

    And while we all know that bees make honey, do you know what honey is and how it’s actually made?

    What is Honey and How is It Made?

    Honey is a golden liquid that is produced by bees using the nectar they collect from flowers and other plants. Honey is a truly fascinating substance, but first let’s talk about how bees produce honey in the first place.

    During the warmer months, bees are busy collecting nectar from flowers and storing it in their stomachs. Nectar, a sugary liquid, becomes a very hardy substance when it is mixed with all of the enzymes found in the stomach of a bee. This is good news, because the nectar will need to be stored in the honeycomb for the winter months. More about this later!

    After filling up with nectar, a bee heads back to the hive where it will pass along the nectar to another bee by regurgitating it into her mouth. Eventually, the nectar will make its way to the honeycomb. At this point, the nectar is still very much a liquid, not like the honey that we are used to. In order to remove the excess liquid in the nectar, bees will begin to vigorously move their wings, fanning the nectar and evaporating the water.

    Now honey is in a sustainable form, sealed away in the honeycomb for the bees to use for food in the winter months.

    Honey is remarkable in so many ways. Its color, texture and taste vary depending on the flower where the bee got its nectar. Different types of honey include clover, linden, buckwheat and eucalyptus – just to name a few.

    Did you know…? Facts About Honey

    There are a ton of interesting facts about honey. Here are just a couple more of our favorites!

    Honey Won’t Go Bad

    Honey is one food you won’t have to worry about spoiling. In fact, it has been reported that honey has been found intact in Egyptian tombs dating back several thousand years.

    Why doesn’t it spoil? Honey is acidic. It’s also very low in moisture (remember the wing flapping thing mentioned above?) and so it is an antibacterial substance.

    Honey is Medicine

    Because of its naturally antibacterial properties, honey has been used as medicine since the days of Mesopotamia. Honey can help heal wounds and treat dandruff and allergies. It has also been used to treat acne and other skin conditions.

    Raw Honey from D-Tek Live Bee Removal

    If you are looking for beautifully natural, raw honey from local San Diego bees, look no further! We sell 100% raw honey all year round for use in cooking, baking and home health and beauty remedies.

    Contact us to learn more about our delicious honey!

    And for all of your live bee removal needs, think D-Tek Live Bee Removal first. We specialize in the humane removal of swarms and hives from residential and commercial properties. When you are in need of the best, the professional bee removal technicians at D-Tek Live Bee Removal are here to help.

    Call us today for your free quote. We look forward to hearing from you!

    The post What is Honey and How Is It Made? appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    How To Handle a Beehive on Your Property

    Warmer weather means outdoor barbeques, baseball games and dips in the pool. But it can also mean swarming bees and beehives! When you are startled by an unexpected hive or frightened by a huge swarm, you will probably wonder how to handle the situation safely and without getting a nasty bee sting.  Honey bees are… The post How To Handle a Beehive on Your Property appeared first on Live Bee...

    how to handle a bee hive

    Warmer weather means outdoor barbeques, baseball games and dips in the pool. But it can also mean swarming bees and beehives! When you are startled by an unexpected hive or frightened by a huge swarm, you will probably wonder how to handle the situation safely and without getting a nasty bee sting. 

    Honey bees are valuable pollinators, so you should never consider trying to kill them. Many conservation agencies, beekeepers and live bee removal experts are working tirelessly to stop the unfortunate decline of honey bees. There are plenty of resources out there to help you if you’re not sure how to remove your swarm or beehive. Don’t resort to exterminating these amazing little creatures! 

    So, what steps should you take if you find a beehive in or around your home or a swarm on your property?  At D-Tek Live Bee Removal, we want to help you handle any bee situation safely and humanely. Here are some tips for handling your next bee visitors. 

    Tips for Handling Beehives on Your Property

    Give them some space. 

    Honey bees are generally pretty docile unless they sense that their hive or queen is in danger. It is never a good idea to poke a beehive or to throw objects such as rocks or baseballs at them. Keeping a safe distance from a hive will decrease the chances of an unwelcome sting or being chased by angry bees.  

    Allergic? Stay away!

    Anyone who is allergic to bee stings should definitely steer clear of a beehive. In fact, it is also smart to bring your pets inside too. Swarms of bees generally don’t bother humans or animals, since they don’t have a hive to protect. But as we mentioned, bees in a hive have a lot at stake so they can get angry when provoked.   

    Where’s the hive?  

    Sometimes the sight of a large number of bees buzzing around is the only sign that there is a hive located on your property. It is important to find the exact location of the hive so you can identify where the bees are coming from and then avoid that area. If the hive is somewhere in your home, be sure to avoid blocking access to the hive. This could encourage the bees to migrate to other areas of your home, causing more damage and hassle.  

    Say no to spray.  

    Whatever you do, do not spray the hive with any chemicals, pesticides or anything that will harm the bees. These chemicals are bad for the continued growth of the bee population.

    Call the professionals at D-Tek Live Bee Removal.  

    Bee removal is a difficult and dangerous job. That’s why it’s important to call the professionals. In order to remove them humanely, you need a team of experts that know how to handle bees and mitigate any potential harm and damage because of them. Plus, when it’s not done properly, bees are likely to come back. 

    Benefits of Hiring D-Tek for Your Live Bee Removal Needs 

    D-Tek has been in the live bee removal business for over 15 years, so we know what they are doing. Not only can we rehome your honey bees with a local beekeeper, but we can also help you repair any damage that the bees have caused. The techniques we use ensure that bees won’t come back to the same place twice, so you can have peace of mind knowing that they won’t come back. 

    If you are in need of live bee removal in San Diego or San Diego County, you should call D-Tek Live Bee Removal today. Our skilled team of live bee removal experts will give you a free, custom quote for your specific situation. 

    We love to help our customers safely remove bees from their properties, homes or businesses. Give us a call today! 

    The post How To Handle a Beehive on Your Property appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    13 Fascinating Facts About Bees

    At D-Tek Live Bee Removal, we love bees! We find them to be endlessly fascinating creatures. And we are not alone – bees are one of the most studied animals due to the vital role they play in our ecosystem.  On our blog, we talk a lot about honey bees: their behavior, the effect they… The post 13 Fascinating Facts About Bees appeared first on Live Bee...

    honey bee facts dtek live bee removal

    At D-Tek Live Bee Removal, we love bees! We find them to be endlessly fascinating creatures. And we are not alone – bees are one of the most studied animals due to the vital role they play in our ecosystem. 

    On our blog, we talk a lot about honey bees: their behavior, the effect they have on our world and the safest and most humane methods for live bee removal. In this post, we want to simply celebrate the amazing bee by sharing some of our favorite bee facts. There is always more to learn about the honey bee!

    13 Fascinating Facts About Honey Bees 

    1. Beekeeping is one of the oldest professions. Although opinions vary, honey bees are thought to have existed up to 150 million years ago. Early records indicate that humans were consuming honey about 10,000 years ago. 
    2. The top 10 honey producing states in the United States are North Dakota, South Dakota, California, Montana, Florida, Texas, Minnesota, Idaho, Louisiana and Washington. 
    3. A honey bee produces about 1/12 of a teaspoon of honey in its lifetime. A worker bee lives an average of 6-8 weeks. 
    4. A single colony of honey bees can produce between 60 and 100 pounds of honey per year. 
    5. Honeycomb cells have a number of functions. Not only do they store honey, but they also hold nectar, pollen, and water. The cells even act as a nursery, housing the larvae until they mature into honey bees. 
    6. Bee colonies can be huge. At their peak, a hive can have a population of 50,000 honey bees. 
    7. Queen bees don’t just laze around while the other bees do all the work. In the summertime, a queen can lay up to 2,500 eggs in a day. Sounds exhausting! 
    8. Ever wonder how a honey bee makes its signature buzzing sound? A honey bee moves its wings at a rate of 11,400 strokes per minute. 
    9. Honey bees actually have 2 sets of wings: one larger, outer set and one smaller, inner set.  
    10. With all those wings, it’s no wonder that a bee can fly at a rate of about 12 miles per hour.
    11. In their relatively short lifespan, worker bees certainly are busy! The worker bees in a hive fly an average of 55,000 miles to produce one pound of honey, visiting approximately 2 million flowers in the process.  
    12. Honey bees have five eyes, three simple eyes that are used to detect light and two compound eyes that are used to detect motion. Bees can even recognize faces, in much the same way as humans do!  
    13. Bees are excellent communicators. They use pheromones and a waggle dance to share important information like the location of a new nest, pollen and water. 

    Do you have honey bees on your San Diego property? 

    While many people think of bees as a pest, we hope that learning some of these honey bee facts helps to put them in a different light. If you have a bee colony living on your property, do not attempt to remove them on your own. Bee removal can be dangerous work – don’t risk your safety. Call the professionals at D-Tek Live Bee Removal. 

    D-Tek Live Bee Removal is your local bee removal expert, specializing in safe and humane live bee removal in San Diego and throughout San Diego County. We completely remove your bees and the honeycomb so you don’t have to worry about the bees returning to the same place in the future. You can feel confident knowing that your bees will be rehomed with one of our trusted local beekeepers. 

    For bee removal, bee repairs and bee proofing at your home or business, call our team today at 760-224-3040 for a free and instant quote. 

    The post 13 Fascinating Facts About Bees appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    Swarms and Colonies: What’s the Difference?

    Spring has sprung in San Diego! With the warmer weather finally here, you may start to notice big bunches of bees in your neighborhood. Since we are entering swarm season, we thought we’d talk a little about the difference between a swarm and a colony and what to do if you encounter either of these… The post Swarms and Colonies: What’s the Difference? appeared first on Live Bee...

    bee swarms and colonies

    Spring has sprung in San Diego! With the warmer weather finally here, you may start to notice big bunches of bees in your neighborhood. Since we are entering swarm season, we thought we’d talk a little about the difference between a swarm and a colony and what to do if you encounter either of these bee formations. 

    What is a swarm? 

    Swarms are actually an integral part of the bee reproductive cycle. They look like big clusters of bees flying close together because that’s what they are! Usually in the springtime, the queen and about half of the worker bees leave their hive behind in search of a new one. While the scout bees look for prime bee real estate, the rest of the bees swarm together in wait. 

    You will typically see swarms in trees or bushes, or even on mailboxes and fences. Swarms can stick around for just a few hours, or even a few weeks. Bee swarms have nothing to protect while they are looking for a new nest location – no honey, brood or beeswax. Because of this, they are usually very docile and unlikely to sting unless disturbed. 

    What is a colony? 

    A colony is when a bunch of bees – sometimes up to 50,000 – are living happily in their hive. After the scout bees find a suitable site for their new nest, the swarm moves in and begins to set up shop. They build comb to store honey and pollen and house the larvae and the pupa. 

    Bee colonies can be located anywhere, including in places we don’t want them, like the walls of our home or other structures. Because the bees now have something to defend, they may be a little more aggressive and could potentially sting if they feel that their hive is being threatened.   

    What should I do when I encounter a swarm or a colony? 

    A large number of bees clustered together can be unnerving and downright scary! But because of how important bees are to our ecosystem, it is important to know what to do if you happen to encounter a large swarm or bee colony. 

    Swarms might look dangerous, but they are generally pretty easygoing. After all, they do not have a home, honey or baby bees to protect. If you do see a swarm on your property, just be patient. They will be on their way in a few hours or a few weeks. Do not attempt to move them on your own or spray them with any chemicals. If they sense a threat, they may still sting. If the bees are in a location that is potentially dangerous, call D-Tek Live Bee removal for help safely relocate the swarm. 

    Colonies are a slightly different story. If you have a bee colony that has shacked up in your wall, chimney, attic, shed or another area that is potentially unsafe, do not attempt to spray them or remove them yourself. They can become aggressive when they sense a threat. The best course of action is to call a professional live bee removal expert to assess the hive and help you determine the best remedy. 

    D-Tek Live Bee Removal not only removes and rehomes the bees, but they are experts at repairing damage from the removal of the hive. Any good bee removal company will also be sure to remove the remaining beeswax to deter bees from coming back or attracting rodents. 

    Safe and Humane Bee Removal Services in San Diego

    Whether you have a swarm or a colony, D-Tek Live Bee Removal is your trusted source for humane live bee removal. Our experts can remove your bees and rehome them with a local beekeeper so you know that you are doing your part to keep bees safe. 

    Contact D-Tek Live Bee Removal when you need bee removal, bee repairs or bee proofing at your San Diego home or business. Our team is ready to help you figure out the best solution for your bee problem!

    Don’t wait and call D-Tek Live Bee Removal today.  

    The post Swarms and Colonies: What’s the Difference? appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    Link to Category: Animal Blogs

    Or if you prefer use one of our linkware images? Click here

    We are listed with SEJ as a top resource for bloggers and SEO experts alike!