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Bee Blog D-Tek Live Bee Removal San Diego

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  • Dave Reed
  • April 30, 2019 01:43:06 AM
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A Little About Us

Our Apiarist has year of experience under his belt when it comes to bee behavior, beekeeping and bee removal. Ever wondered why bees swarm or what are the healing properties of honey? You'll find these answers and more in our Bee Blog.

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    How Do Bees Make Honey?

    Have you ever wondered exactly how those little bees make delicious honey? After all, honey is sold everywhere in the world from grocery stores to market stalls to small farms. It is one of the most nutritious foods you can eat, not to mention that it comes in handy in a variety of unique recipes… The post How Do Bees Make Honey? appeared first on Live Bee...

    bee removal in san diego

    Have you ever wondered exactly how those little bees make delicious honey? After all, honey is sold everywhere in the world from grocery stores to market stalls to small farms. It is one of the most nutritious foods you can eat, not to mention that it comes in handy in a variety of unique recipes and DIY projects.

    So, how do those bees do it? In truth, the process is quite simple. 

    Which bees make honey? 

    A common notion is that all bees make honey, but this is false. In actuality, there are only about seven species of honey bees who dedicate their lives to making honey. 

    Anyway, inside the hive you have the worker bees who set off in search of nectar and pollen. These are called foragers. There are other worker bees at the hive who take these ingredients and turn them into honey that is stored in honeycomb cells. Each honey bee will only produce about 1/12 of a tablespoon of honey!

    Step One: The Flowers

    Honey bees don’t live very long. But during their short lives, the worker bees stay busy by traveling far and wide visiting anywhere between 100-600 flowers. When they come across a nectar that they like, the bees sit on top of the flower and suck the nectar through their proboscis (straw-like mouth). They store it in sacs called “crops” or “honey stomachs” along with a bit of spit. Yes, honey is, in essence, bee spit and nectar combined! Sounds gross but tastes delicious. 

    Step Two: Back To The Hive 

    Once the worker bees’ honey stomachs are full, they fly back to the hive and hand over their ingredients to the hive bees. During the transfer from bee to bee, the honey is chewed up and deposited into the wax cells within the hive. This causes the pH levels and other properties to change making the honey very watery. 

    That’s okay, because these crafty bees have a way to fix that. They actually dehydrate the honey by spreading it out over the cells and fanning their wings in front of it to evaporate the extra liquid. Once the honey is the proper consistency, bees cover it up with beeswax so it’s ready to be stored over the winter.   

    Step Three: Honey Harvesting

    Though honey is meant to feed the bees when food is scarce, they tend to be overachievers, making much more honey than they would need for their colonies. This is good news for us because we can harvest that 70 pound surplus of honey that they won’t need. 

    Beekeepers have bee houses called apiaries. Inside these houses are square frames where the bees build their honeycomb. Once the beekeeper has removed every seal over the individual cells, they put the honey frames into a centrifuge which spins and extracts the honey from the comb.

    From there, the honey will be put through a strainer because bits of pollen and debris can still be present within the honey. After all of that, the beekeepers bottle it up for sale.  

    Different Tasting Honey

    Because bees visit so many different flowers and plants, and because some bees have specific flower preferences, honey can take on all kinds of different flavors, hues, and textures. Clover honey is one of the most popular flavors because clovers happen to be a favorite amongst our little bee friends. 

    Due to the type of flower, clover honey is more floral tasting and takes on a light amber hue. Likewise, Apple Blossom honey will, of course, taste slightly like apples and Buckwheat Honey will taste very strong and take on a dark color, almost like molasses. It all depends on what is available to the bees and what they prefer. This means there are countless types of honey out there to sample and try.  

    Natural honey is unprocessed and free of any synthetic additives, sweeteners, or preservatives. It is raw, natural, and possibly one of the healthiest foods out there. What’s more, honey is the only food that never spoils. That’s right, you can keep it on your shelf for life. It may harden and crystallize over time, but you can easily transform it into its normal consistency by putting the container in some hot water.  

    You can also use the beeswax in a number of different DIY projects such as making candles, lip balm, and even perfume. Bees make sure nothing goes to waste, so the entire honeycomb can be repurposed. It’s pretty cool that all of this can be done by such diminutive creatures. Whether you enjoy honey or not, there is one thing we can all agree upon- bees are absolutely amazing! 

    The post How Do Bees Make Honey? appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    All About Forager Bees

    A honey bee hive is just like a bustling city. Every member plays a specific role in order to keep things run smoothly day after day. While all of the bees play a vital role, the worker bees certainly do a lot of the heavy lifting. Not only do they act as nurses to the… The post All About Forager Bees appeared first on Live Bee...

    pollen bee

    A honey bee hive is just like a bustling city. Every member plays a specific role in order to keep things run smoothly day after day. While all of the bees play a vital role, the worker bees certainly do a lot of the heavy lifting. Not only do they act as nurses to the brood and clean up after the queen, they play a critical role in the collection and production of their most valuable asset – food! 

    If you watch a honey bee hive for any amount of time during the busy season, you will see a flurry of activity from worker bees known as foragers. They go back and forth between the hive and their food or water source, bringing back the valuable resources needed to keep the bees alive and thriving. 

    Why Do Bees Forage 

    Foragers leave the hive for several reasons, and they all have to do with food. The most commonly known reasons they leave their hive is to collect nectar. Foragers stop at hundreds of flowers on an average foraging trip. While there, they collect nectar to bring back to the hive for processing into honey. Honey is the primary resource that bees make, and it is the substance that sustains them throughout the long, cold winter. So, needless to say, nectar is vitally important to the survival of bees! 

    Bees also collect pollen on their foraging trips. Small yellow dots of pollen can often be seen on the legs of honey bees. And this is more of an accident than a purposeful activity. While the bees are removing nectar from the flower, pollen inevitably gets stuck to their legs. This forms the basis of pollination. When the bee buzzes on to the next flower, she will leave some of that pollen behind, thus helping the flower reproduce. Pollen is also purposefully collected in pollen sacs and brought back to the hive. It is a valuable source of protein and minerals. 

    Like most other animals, bees require water to survive. Foragers go out in search of a water source. Upon their return to the hive, other worker bees are waiting to collect the water and process it to meet the needs of the hive. Water has many uses in a hive, including: 

    In the summertime, the hive can get very hot. In order to control the temperature, the bees furiously fan the water with their wings, creating an evaporative effect that cools the hive. Water is also used in feeding the larvae, or the future honey bees that have yet to emerge from their cells. Water is also used to rehydrate honey that has crystallized. 

    Learn more about honey crystallization. 

    How Do Bees Know Where to Go

    One of the most fascinating things about foragers is how they do this important work of collecting nectar, pollen and water. Unlike us, they don’t have a smartphone with a map in their pockets to tell them where to go and how to get back home. The world outside the hive is full of dangers for honey bees. Plus, they can’t lollygag- the rest of the colony is relying on them to bring back the goods! They need to have a good system of communication and navigation. 

    You may have heard of the waggle dance. It’s a physical motion that is a means of communication between bees. When a forager returns to the hive, she will use the waggle dance to communicate to the other bees the direction, distance and quality of a water or food source. 

    Foragers also have an amazing sense of direction. After all, they are able to go back and forth between a flower and their hive many times in a given day. This ability is likely a combination of factors and it’s not completely known by researchers at this time. The sun appears to play a role. 

    Do you want to learn more about the different roles played by the bees in a hive? Check out these articles from the D-Tek Live Bee Removal Bee Blog! 

    What is the role of the drone in a honey bee colony?

    Are worker bees the busiest bees? 

    Your most buzzing questions about the queen bee answered 

    The post All About Forager Bees appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    3 Easy Ways to Help Bees and Other Pollinators

    Are you wanting to help honey bees, but have no idea where to start? Are you concerned about the decline in honey bee populations? Do you care about protecting the environment? Luckily, there are a number of simple things you can do to help bees and other pollinators that only take a little bit of… The post 3 Easy Ways to Help Bees and Other Pollinators appeared first on Live Bee...

    wildflowers bees

    Are you wanting to help honey bees, but have no idea where to start? Are you concerned about the decline in honey bee populations? Do you care about protecting the environment? Luckily, there are a number of simple things you can do to help bees and other pollinators that only take a little bit of effort. And you can even do them right from the comfort of your home! 

    Did you know that honey bees are not the only pollinators? 

    When you follow the three tips below, you are doing much more than helping honey bees. You are actually creating the best environment for other pollinators to do their work. 

    Even though we usually think of honey bees, there are plenty of other species that participate in pollination. Insects such as butterflies, moths, beetles, mosquitoes, ants and wasps are popular pollinators. Birds, especially hummingbirds, and bats pollinate many of the foods we know and love, including bananas, avocados, dates, figs, mangoes and cocoa.  

    3 Tips for Helping Pollinators from Home

    With these three tips, you can do your part to protect our pollinators and the environment. Let’s dive into it! 

    Provide a Water Source

    In the spring and summer seasons, honey bees and other pollinators are very busy in the San Diego area. Foragers bees, those who are responsible for gathering pollen and nectar, can log between 5 and 6 miles and visit more than 2,000 flowers in a day. Amazing, right? 

    With all of this work, it is no wonder that bees get thirsty. Not only do bees need to drink water, they are responsible for bringing water back to the colony for use in the hive. The water is used to cool the hive in the hot summer months, control the humidity inside the hive, dilute crystallized honey and feed the larvae.  

    A simple way to help bees and other pollinators is to provide them with a clean and consistent water source. A bird bath does the job. Or, you can build your own bee bath. To make a bee bath, simply add some rocks to a shallow dish and then fill with water so that the tops of the rocks are exposed. This provides a safe place for bees to land while they come for a quick drink.

    Plant a Bee-Friendly Garden

    Another way to help pollinators is to plant a bee-friendly garden. This tip will take a little more effort, but the payoff can be huge. A garden full of a variety of plants and wildflowers will provide pollinators with a wide range of plants from which they can source nectar and pollen. Bees and other pollinators thrive when there is variety in their food. If you live in California, chances are that a garden planted with lavender, lilacs, sunflowers, mint, rosemary and thyme will be sure to attract lots of bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Even weeds such as dandelions attract pollinators! 

    Do some research to find out which plants and wildflowers thrive in your area. If you don’t have a garden, you can still do your part. Can you plant some herbs on a windowsill or balcony? Get creative and maximize any outdoor space you have access to. 

    Give Wild Bees a Good Home 

    Honey bees and bumblebees are not the only species of bees we should pay attention to. In fact, wild bees are equally important to the environment and also face decline. The primary reason for the decline is a loss of their habitat. 

    So, what can you do to help wild bees? Give them a safe place to call home! Wild bees usually live alone and love to choose underground and cozy places to nest. You can recreate these conditions by providing them with a hollowed out piece of wood or by leaving the ground of your garden undisturbed. You can even build a simple bee house by drilling holes into a piece of wood. 

    The post 3 Easy Ways to Help Bees and Other Pollinators appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    Signs You Might Have a Bee Infestation

    We all know that bees are an important part of our ecosystem. Their pollination efforts keep flowers blooming and food on our plates. Plus, the honey they make is pretty darn delicious. But when they infest your home or property, they can be much more than a hassle! They can be dangerous for your family… The post Signs You Might Have a Bee Infestation appeared first on Live Bee...

    myths about bees

    We all know that bees are an important part of our ecosystem. Their pollination efforts keep flowers blooming and food on our plates. Plus, the honey they make is pretty darn delicious. But when they infest your home or property, they can be much more than a hassle! They can be dangerous for your family and destructive to your home. 

    Bee stings can be painful and even deadly for people who are allergic to their venom. Sections of your home can be destroyed when bees decide to build their nest inside your walls, attic or even in your floorboards. These two things alone should be enough to convince you to hire a professional live bee removal company at the first sign of a bee infestation. Never attempt to handle bees on your own. The job is difficult enough, even for the pros! 

    Knowing if you have an infestation is not always as easy as you’d think. However, there are a few telltale signs that your home or property is infested with bees. If you aren’t sure whether you have a bee issue, just make one quick call to your local bee removal experts at D-Tek Live Bee Removal. One of our qualified technicians will come to your property right away to perform a free inspection and offer you a fair and accurate quote for services. 

    Contact D-Tek Live Bee Removal at 760-224-3040 for all of your San Diego county bee removal needs. We specialize in live bee removal, which means that we only use safe and humane bee removal practices. 

    Do You Have a Bee Infestation? 

    If you think you have a bee infestation, ask yourself these three questions and then call a San Diego bee removal expert. 

    Is there an increase in bee activity? 

    A telltale sign that you may have a bee infestation on your hands is an increase in bee activity. You may notice more than the average number of bees flying around your home. You may find bees inside your home when you never usually see them indoors. You may even start to hear the buzz of bees in and around your home. 

    In any case, more bees probably means that there is a hive somewhere close by. Oftentimes you can locate the hive by following the travel routes of the bees. If you choose to do this, be careful and take measures to avoid disturbing the hive in any way. 

    Do you see an active nest around your home? 

    If you happen to find a hive on your property, you will want to check to see if it’s an active hive (from a safe distance, of course). An active bee hive will have obvious bee activity, with bees coming in and out as they take their important foraging trips to local flowers. Even if you suspect that a hive has been abandoned by its inhabitants, take care not to disturb it. Surprising the bees will probably not end well for you! 

    Are there any inexplicable dark spots on your walls? 

    Another sign that you might be dealing with a bee infestation is the appearance of mysterious dark spots on your walls or ceilings. When honey bees build a nest inside the structure of your walls, they fill the cells with honey. Inevitably, some of the honey seeps out of the honeycomb and onto your walls. The honey will destroy wood, drywall and other building materials. It can even attract lots of other pests including rodents and insects to the area, causing even more damage. 

    D-Tek Live Bee Removal – San Diego Humane Live Bee Removal 

    Usually, it’s best to leave bees alone unless they pose a danger to humans or your home. Hopefully, these three questions can help you determine if you have a bee infestation. If so, do not hesitate to contact D-Tek Live Bee Removal for the best live bee removal services in the San Diego area. We can respond quickly to your call and get a technician to your property fast. 

    Call 760-224-3040 today to rid your home of a pesky honey bee infestation! 

    The post Signs You Might Have a Bee Infestation appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    Are Honey Bees Vanishing?

    If you have been keeping up with honey bee news over the last 15 years, you’ve probably heard a great deal about colony collapse disorder (CCD). Very often, people use this term as a catch-all for any conversation about the decline of honey bee populations. While colony collapse disorder has been responsible for a percentage… The post Are Honey Bees Vanishing? appeared first on Live Bee...

    bee removal

    If you have been keeping up with honey bee news over the last 15 years, you’ve probably heard a great deal about colony collapse disorder (CCD). Very often, people use this term as a catch-all for any conversation about the decline of honey bee populations. While colony collapse disorder has been responsible for a percentage of the decline, there are many other factors that have negatively impacted honey bees. 

    In fact, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports that cases of colony collapse disorder have decreased over recent years. In this article, we will learn more about CCD as well as some of the other causes of honey bee decline. 

    What is Colony Collapse Disorder? 

    CCD first came to the attention of beekeepers back in 2006-2007. Many were reporting high losses of colonies that could not be explained by the typical causes. Beekeepers noticed that there was a sudden loss, sometimes even overnight, of the worker bee population. While most of the worker bees disappeared, the queen, brood and honey stores were left behind. The strange thing was that there were no dead worker bees found around the hive. 

    This puzzling phenomenon caused significant losses for a number of years. And it was so puzzling that researchers are still not 100% certain of the cause of colony collapse disorder.

    Although CCD has reportedly declined over recent years, it is not the only cause of honey bee decline and death. Some of the other factors that can impact our honey bee friends include parasites, pesticides, disease, nutrition and habitat change. Most likely, the population declines are some combination of these factors. Researchers are continuing to study these fascinating creatures to learn more about how the environment and manmade irritants can impact their lifespan. 

    Pesticides 

    The EPA defines a pesticide as “any substance or mixture of substances intended for preventing, destroying, repelling or mitigating any pest.” Agricultural pesticides are chemicals used to kill plants and, when used, infect all of the plant’s tissues. Small amounts of the chemicals have been found in pollen. When the honey bees collect pollen from infected plants, they bring the chemicals back to the hive where it is used to make food. Over time, the chemicals build up and can impact how bees communicate, develop and forage for food. Pesticides have also been shown to weaken their immune systems and make them more vulnerable to parasites and disease. 

    Parasites 

    Honey bees are vulnerable to parasites, one of the most dangerous being the varroa mite. Adult varroa mites infiltrate brood cells where they lay their eggs. The eggs will develop inside the brood cell. When they reach adulthood, they mate and emerge from the cell with the honey bee. They then infect another brood cell and begin the process all over again. Varroa mite infestation can spread exponentially. The greatest danger associated with these parasites is their ability to pass on diseases to the colony. 

    Disease

    Common diseases that can impact a honey bee colony include Deformed Wing Virus and American Foulbrood. Deformed Wing Virus comes from varroa mites and can cause the death of pupae and deformed wings and abdomens. American Foulbrood is caused by a bacteria that can wipe out the brood. 

    Nutrition 

    The changing environment and the effects of certain farming practices have also impacted honey bees. For example, farms that grow only one type of crop severely limit the diversity in the pollen available to bees. A limited diet can impact a bee’s immune system and nutrition, making them more susceptible to disease. 

    The more we learn about honey bees, the more we understand that they must be protected. By choosing live bee removal, you are doing your part to keep bees safe and sound. If you have a honey bee problem on your property, call D-Tek Live Bee Removal for a free inspection and quote. Don’t put bees in danger by choosing a pest control company that uses harmful chemicals! Opt for the humane choice with D-Tek Live Bee Removal. 

    The post Are Honey Bees Vanishing? appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


    Why Live Bee Removal is the Best Choice

    Here at D-Tek Live Bee Removal, we talk a lot about live bee removal and the benefits of choosing live bee removal over other forms of pest control. As one of the leading bee removal experts in the San Diego area, we field a ton of questions from concerned homeowners and business owners across the… The post Why Live Bee Removal is the Best Choice appeared first on Live Bee...

    honeycomb

    Here at D-Tek Live Bee Removal, we talk a lot about live bee removal and the benefits of choosing live bee removal over other forms of pest control. As one of the leading bee removal experts in the San Diego area, we field a ton of questions from concerned homeowners and business owners across the San Diego area who want to know why live bee removal is superior to other forms of bee removal. 

    We believe that live bee removal is the only way to safely rid your home of problem honey bees, which is why we have been specializing in humane bee removal for over 15 years. 

    Just what is live bee removal? Why should I choose live bee removal? Can’t I just remove the bees on my own with a hose or broom? Read on to get the answers to these common questions about San Diego live bee removal. If you need help with a hive or swarm on your property, don’t hesitate to call in the professionals at D-Tek Live Bee Removal. Our expert technician can be dispatched to your property right away to assess your bee situation and take care of the problem quickly and affordably. 

    What is live bee removal? 

    We are glad you asked! Live bee removal is a unique process in which honey bees are removed alive and well from your property. We do this using a special vacuum system that gently sucks out the bees. Then, the bees are transferred to a beehive box and transported to a San Diego area apiary. Our beekeeper cares for the bees, giving them a perfect new home to pollinate the local crops and orchards. During the live bee removal process, we do not use harsh chemicals or pesticides that can harm the bees. 

    Why choose live bee removal? 

    When you choose live bee removal, you are choosing to protect honey bees rather than exterminate them. As you probably have heard, honey bee populations have been in a decline due to environmental factors, disease, weather and infestations by varroa mites. By choosing to hire a typical exterminator to handle your bee infestation, you are contributing to the decline of the honey bee population and creating a negative impact on the local ecosystem. 

    In addition, working with a live bee removal company ensures that the job is done humanely and correctly. You see, your average exterminator will quickly rid your property of bees using chemicals. However, they often neglect to remove the honeycomb which could cause you issues down the road. Honeycomb contains odors that attract bees. If the honeycomb is left in the area, more bees will buzz to your property in the future. A live bee removal technician will know to remove all of the honey and honeycomb so your property will be protected.     

    Can you remove bees on your own? 

    The short answer is no. It is never a good idea to remove bees on your own. Bees can be defensive when they are aggravated or feel that their hive is being threatened. Even if you aren’t allergic to bee venom, multiple bee stings can be very dangerous. In addition to the risk of stings, bee removal requires the use of specialized equipment and specific knowledge that the average person does not possess. Without the right tools, the chance of doing the job safely and well is very slim. 

    D-Tek Live Bee Removal San Diego Area Honey Bee Removal Experts 

    If you live in the San Diego area and are pestered by a bee infestation on your property, call D-Tek Live Bee Removal today at 760-224-3040. We offer free inspections and estimates so you can confidently hire us to perform your bee removal service. 

    The post Why Live Bee Removal is the Best Choice appeared first on Live Bee Removal.


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