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Artificial Intelligence and Search Engines

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  • July 17, 2018 07:44:00 PM
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A Little About Us

The Artemis Marketing blog is an excellent resource for news, information and advice on the world of Search Engine Optimisation and digital marketing. Whether you’re a seasoned SEO expert or looking for tips on the basics of SEO, the Artemis Marketing blog has what you are looking for. The blog is regularly updated by the expert SEO team at Artemis with features, news and more.

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    Artemis supports Kangaroos at Christmas Tree Festival

    We are delighted to be supporting our partner charity, Kangaroos, at the Cuckfield Church Christmas Tree Festival at the parish church of Holy Trinity. This year, the festival is partnering with Kangaroos to raise much needed funds for this amazing charity, so we of course wanted to be involved. Every year local businesses sponsor trees […] The post Artemis supports Kangaroos at Christmas Tree Festival appeared first on Artemis...

    SEO stardom Christmas tree

    We are delighted to be supporting our partner charity, Kangaroos, at the Cuckfield Church Christmas Tree Festival at the parish church of Holy Trinity. This year, the festival is partnering with Kangaroos to raise much needed funds for this amazing charity, so we of course wanted to be involved.

    Every year local businesses sponsor trees at the festival and half of the funds raised go to the chosen charity. Businesses are invited to decorate a tree in the church either to a Christmas theme or to represent their organisation.

    The first festival was held in 2003 and due to its tremendous success, it has become an annual event the local community look forward to every year.

    Artemis have sponsored a tree at this year’s festival for the first time in support of Kangaroos. We decided on our theme ‘SEO stardom’ and to represent the ethical side of our business we voted to handmake all of our Christmas decorations (not a plastic decoration in sight!). Well done to the Artemis crafters! You did a great job!

    Artemis team makes decorations

    A bunch of the Artemis team have been busy over the last few weeks getting together (at the pub) to make a zillion stars (well not a zillion, but it felt like it!) and today we headed down to the church to decorate our tree, ready for the festival which runs over this coming weekend (Friday 7th December – 9th December).

    We were blown away by the wonderful displays and we think we did an amazing job with our tree too.

    Please go and support Kangaroos this weekend. There is a rich music programme running all weekend with choirs, instrumental performances and singers. See the programme of events here. We can’t recommend this event highly enough.

    Pop in and see our tree. Some of the Artemis team will be there on Saturday afternoon helping out on the Kangaroos stall. Do come and say hello if you can make it. It’s the perfect event to get you in the Christmas spirit.

    We’ve been really proud of our efforts to support Kangaroos over the course of 2018, raising nearly £6.5K. Kangaroos run fun and social activities in a supported setting for children and young adults with learning disabilities and we know how much this charity means to the young people and families who use their services.

    We are looking forward to working with Kangaroos in 2019, which will be their 25th anniversary year and hope to smash our fundraising target of £6K again next year.

     

    The post Artemis supports Kangaroos at Christmas Tree Festival appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    9 Simple A/B tests you can run to improve conversions

    A lot of website owners think that the most vital part of their online business is getting traffic. While this is, of course, pretty essential, there’s actually something far more important to work towards – converting that traffic into paying customers. It sounds obvious, but it’s easy to get caught up in metrics like search […] The post 9 Simple A/B tests you can run to improve conversions appeared first on Artemis...

    A lot of website owners think that the most vital part of their online business is getting traffic. While this is, of course, pretty essential, there’s actually something far more important to work towards – converting that traffic into paying customers.

    It sounds obvious, but it’s easy to get caught up in metrics like search engine rankings and page traffic and forget about what’s actually making you money!

    A/B testing

    When it comes to boosting conversions quickly and effectively, A/B testing is the answer.

    Also known as split testing, A/B testing is where you make one small change to a web page (or advert, or marketing email) and run both the new and original versions simultaneously, to see which one brings in more customers. Rather than just assuming that a bigger button is better or having “a hunch” that a simpler banner will boost click-throughs, A/B testing provides solid evidence.

    Here are some examples of really simple A/B tests that can have a surprising impact on your conversions – just remember to only change one thing at a time, so you can clearly see which options are more effective.

    1. Rephrasing your Call to Action (CTA) – is “Buy Now” more effective than “Add to Basket”? Now you’ll know for sure.
    2. Moving your CTA button – you might find more people click on a button that’s higher up the page or is slightly bigger than your current one.
    3. Changing the colour of your CTA button – do your customers see the colour green as “go” or will red instil urgency into their click-through? What Only an A/B test will tell you for sure.
    4. Swapping images – will a photograph perform better than an illustration? Perhaps your customers would rather see a young entrepreneur than a picture of your product – or perhaps not. Play around with images to see how they affect your conversion rates.
    5. Refining your headlines – try using this title text to address your customer pain points or explain the benefits you bring them. Does it make a difference?
    6. Compare subject lines – if you’re running an email campaign, see how a playful subject line plays against an informative one, or whether asking a question yields better results than a short, simple statement.
    7. Revise your copy – this might be a bigger job than some of the others, but it can provide excellent returns. Can you make your text longer? Shorter? Punchier? More problem-focused? Chattier?
    8. Simplify your navigation – if your customers are getting distracted or confused by pages within pages, try changing the location of your navigation tools (and possibly the language they use) to make it easier for browsers to hit “buy”.
    9. Shorten your forms – you might think that you need all that data “for marketing”, but if it’s actually putting customers off, is it worth it? Split test long and short forms to see how much business they’re costing you, if any.

    Keep in mind, a single A/B test is unlikely to revolutionise your business. It’s more about incremental gains that slowly but surely help your website to work as hard as it possibly can for you and your customers, making the most out of its excellent ranking and high volume of traffic. For friendly technical advice and more details about different ways in which you can increase your website conversions, give our team a call or leave us a comment below

    The post 9 Simple A/B tests you can run to improve conversions appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    Four quick daily Google Analytics checks

    Here are four quick daily Google Analytics checks courtesy of Senior SEO Manager Jack Stonehouse.  Google Analytics is a free service offered by Google that provides insights and data for your website traffic. It has a vast amount of useful information that you can use to ensure your business is on track. It can however […] The post Four quick daily Google Analytics checks appeared first on Artemis...

    Here are four quick daily Google Analytics checks courtesy of Senior SEO Manager Jack Stonehouse. 

    Google Analytics is a free service offered by Google that provides insights and data for your website traffic. It has a vast amount of useful information that you can use to ensure your business is on track. It can however be quite overwhelming when you log in there are hundreds if not thousands of reports you can view and create.

    Below are a handful of quick and simple checks you can do for your website. I prefer to change my date view to show the last 30 days or so, this gives me a better trend across the month. I will also review all the reports compared to the previous 30 days and the same period last year. Comparing year on year will help identify any seasonal trends.

    What we are looking out for is any major change that isn’t in line with the normal trend.

    1. Channels

    The channels report is found by going to Acquisition > All Traffic > Channels. This report covers the main mediums that send you traffic. The key channels are:

    • Organic Search – This is all traffic from Search Engines (Google, Bing, Duck Duck Go etc.)
    • Paid Search – This is traffic from PPC ads such as Google Adwords
    • Direct – This is traffic that comes from users that type your website domain name straight into the browser, it is also a catch-all for traffic that Google cannot identify and is just placed in the Direct bucket
    • Social – This is traffic from social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest
    • Referral – This is traffic to your website from other websites
    • Email – This is traffic from Email campaigns

    The key stats to check on the channel report are Users, Sessions, Bounce Rate, Conversion Rate and Revenue/Goals (Revenue for E-commerce websites and Goals for all other sites).

     

    You can change the data that is displayed on the graph by using the menu/drop down highlighted red in the screenshot above.

    2. Referrals

    The referrals report is found by going to Acquisition > All Traffic > Referrals. This report shows traffic to your website from other websites.

    This check is just a quick one to see if there are any new websites that are driving traffic to your site. If there are you could potentially contact them to see how you could both work together to increase the traffic further. This could be through providing them content with another link back to your website, or if have an affiliate system setup, you could ask them to sign up.

    3. Landing Pages

    The landing pages report is found by going to Behaviour > Site Content > Landing Pages. This report shows which pages users land on when they first come to your website.

    This is important to monitor for any vast changes in visits, some common situations for an increase in landing page traffic are if a social post goes viral, you get a good backlink that is driving traffic or a key term starts ranking in a high up position in the Search Engine Results Pages.

    4. Ecommerce Overview

    The ecommerce overview report is found by going to Conversions > Ecommerce >Overview. This report is just for sites that sell products and shows key information such as revenue and conversion rate.

    You need to enable this report by adding ecommerce tracking to your website, it is also recommended you add enhanced ecommerce tracking so you get even more in-depth data to review.

    Key stats to watch here are any drop in revenue or conversion rate, some reasons could be due to an item going out of stock or an issue with the checkout process.

    For more detailed statistics you can also view the following e-commerce reports (once you have enabled enhanced tracking):

    • Shopping Behaviour
    • Checkout Behaviour
    • Product Performance
    • Sale Performance

    If you have any questions then please leave a comment below or get in touch with our friendly team here.

    The post Four quick daily Google Analytics checks appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    Five things to consider when optimising for mobile search

    This week’s blog is provided by guest writer Vlad Koval from Ahrefs. Mobile search has been revolutionising the SEO world for several years now. Google recently rolled out their mobile-first index along with AMP (accelerated mobile pages) which led to a certain confusion among website owners and SEOs, as it was unclear how much it will […] The post Five things to consider when optimising for mobile search appeared first on Artemis...

    This week’s blog is provided by guest writer Vlad Koval from Ahrefs.

    Mobile search has been revolutionising the SEO world for several years now. Google recently rolled out their mobile-first index along with AMP (accelerated mobile pages) which led to a certain confusion among website owners and SEOs, as it was unclear how much it will affect the rankings and what needs to be done.

    And seeing that the ratio of smartphone searches to desktop ones increases each year, a mobile-friendly site should be at the top of your priorities list. But what exactly does it take to create a mobile version of a site that not only complies with the recommendations by Google but also brings a huge amount of organic traffic?

    In this article, we take a look at five key things to consider when you optimise your website for mobile search.

    1. Responsiveness

    Broken elements

    First things first, responsiveness is something most of the website owners fail at. And it can be very challenging since you need to check if everything is intact on so many screens and resolutions. And it is still common to see a broken slider, unusable navigation, overlapping sections, and countless other issues. It makes the whole user experience an absolute disaster. Which means that your website will suffer a big loss in credibility in the eyes of your potential customers.

    Not only does it scare people off, it can have a negative impact on your rankings since Google indexes and accesses your mobile version and, as many SEOs believe, also behaviour aspects such as dwell time. And even though Google might rank pages with responsiveness issues, chances are it will gain more significance as a ranking factor in the future.

    So, don’t hesitate, grab your smartphone and check your site right now. Although, the more efficient way would be to use specialised tools, like Device toolbar in Chrome:

    As you can see, you can choose between the most common mobile devices and test how your site appears on them. The tool is highly accurate and can be recommended. Note that Apple devices can render your site differently; make sure to compare Android and IOS views (and maybe Microsoft for that matter).

    The same goes for browsers. Cross-browser compatibility has been a thing for a long time and is still one of the first things to check when optimising for mobile search. At the same time, it probably wouldn’t make much sense to optimise your site for every single browser. Focus on the most popular ones: Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge.

    Another important aspect that you shouldn’t ignore landscape mode which is also used when browsing the Internet. Click the toggle button in Device toolbar to check that view:

    Hidden sections

    Mobile versions tend to have less information on the screen which is understandable. But sometimes it comes at the expense of the amount of content a page could have compared to desktop.

    Google have explicitly said that both versions need to be equivalent and that includes images, videos, etc. It might be related to Google’s mobile-first index. According to that, the mobile version is prioritised for indexing by Google.

    Viewport

    Screen sizes are constantly changing. And you, as a site owner or an SEO, want to be sure that your site works equally well on each of them. And this is what viewport is for. Each of your pages must include a meta viewport tag which gives instructions to browsers on how to control the page’s dimensions and scaling.

    If you are a curious, you might’ve seen one of those in source code:

    <meta name=”viewport” content=”width=device-width, initial-scale=1″>

    If it’s not set for some reason, the mobile browser will return the desktop version of your site. And this is unarguably bad user experience. You can find out more about it at w3schools.

    2. Usability

    When you are done tweaking your website to make it look fabulous on mobile devices, it’s time to move on to its usability. This part is less straightforward and usually requires more time to fix. How do you determine if your website is handy on smartphones? There are a huge number of factors that come into play.

    Start with the basics, like font; its colour, size, boldness, and font family. Some things work for desktop, but turn out to be a bad choice on mobile. Ask someone to check your page with a fresh set of eyes and ask them if they experience any difficulties and where.

    Don’t use more than six words on one line for mobile view. Otherwise, the text gets smaller and smaller making it harder to read. The more effort it takes to check your site, the less time your visitors will spend there. Here’s a great video on top 10 on-page SEO plays which includes tips for enhancing user experience.

    Another thing to consider is your buttons. People tend to forget that mouse pointer is much thinner and smaller than a human’s finger. This is why buttons need to be spacious enough for us to be able to click on them. Here’s an example:

    If you use any animations, like gifs or video, make sure they are playable but not set to autoplay. Best practice is to let the user decide to play the video or not.

    Pop-ups

    We have been talking so far about things that can improve your website, but there are some that are a big no-no. Some examples include huge newsletters or pop-up windows that cover the whole screen. They are also known as interstitials and can be a reason for penalising. There are three types of pop-ups that are deemed unacceptable by Google:

    • A pop-up appears immediately after a user navigates to a page through search results and covers the screen
    • A standalone pop-up that user has to dismiss before viewing that actual content
    • A layout where the pop-up window is placed at the top, and the rest of the page is in-lined below it

    But there are some ways that you can use pop-ups:

    • Cookies or age verification banners, basically, legal obligation types
    • Login dialogs where the content is not publicly accessible e.g. the content put behind a paywall
    • Banners that don’t occupy much space and can be easily dismissed

    Instead of bluntly shoving your message into visitor’s faces, try to find a more sophisticated way of delivering it. As a workaround, you can use in-text hyperlinks, CTA buttons, etc. Something less intrusive and more user-focused.

    3. AMP

    AMP, or accelerated mobile pages, is an open-source library aimed at loading mobile pages in a matter of milliseconds. You might not know that this is not actually Google’s initiative, but a project sponsored by them. There has been a lot of talk around whether this will boost sites’ rankings or not. And the main question is: do you need to create new, AMP-based versions of your pages?

    Let’s start with some facts. Google officially stated that they index a non-AMP version of the page first. Which means this is not a compulsory change that everyone needs to implement. At the same time, it’s unlikely they support an idea that wouldn’t make any difference in how Google works.

    And AMPs do load pretty much instantly. This icon in the search results indicates that the page is powered by AMP:

    However, you do need to sacrifice something to get that awesome page speed:

    • Style sheets – first of all, AMP is a simplified version of your page which can make it look generic. Prepare to see plain text and images instead of the fancy styles you deliberately picked.
    • Cache – one of the things that contributes to your pages loading faster is that Google uses a cached version of your content. It is delivered via CDN which makes tracking a lot harder than it used to be. And caching is a core part of the AMP system, so you can’t disable it.
    • Backlinks – if someone finds your piece of content awesome and wants to link to it, the link will go to google.com. Because Google is the one that serves the content. As a result, you lose a potential backlink. Drawback? Definitely.

    AMP is still a great step towards standardised mobile optimisation, it’s just that it’s not perfect and has some flaws to consider. But nevertheless, you can experiment with some of your content anyways to see if it works for you.#

    4. Page Speed

    Obviously, page speed is related to AMP and usability. But it’s such a huge topic that it deserves its own section. Especially, if you have a regular mobile page. Page speed, bounce rate, and dwell time together have an enormous impact on your rankings. And here’s what you can do to make your pages load faster:

    • Hosting – no matter how hard you optimised your page the hosting will always be in the way of great speed results. Unless it’s top-notch and works at its highest capacity. You don’t necessarily have to buy the most expensive one; it’s more a question of what kind of CMS (or any other solution) you use. For example, Magento 2 websites are very resource-consuming and require a powerful hosting plan.
    • Minified CSS and JS files – a simple but effective trick. Get rid of spaces between the lines of CSS and JS code so that the browser can load the files faster.
    • Optimised images – images are the ones that usually take the longest to load resulting in additional seconds no one wants to wait. You can simply compress them to reduce the size.
    • Use a caching system – again, this depends on the platform you chose for your site. WordPress users can try WP Super Cache plugin. Magento and Prestashop have their own built-in cache functionality. Find the best option for you and get the most of it.
    • Redirects – too many redirects can cause a significant delay in opening your page. Try to get rid of them or reduce their number where possible.

    On having implemented the optimisation tips, you might be wondering how well you did. You can test it with the Google’s PageSpeed Insights tool. The tool gives a speed grade for both mobile and desktop views along with some tips and hints on how to fix them.

    Ahrefs’ Site Audit tool that helps you find on-site SEO issues of your site, has page speed report based on all the pages crawled within the project:

    Run a crawl of your website, get a list of the pages with slow loading speed and fix them using actionable hints.

    5. Schema Structured Data

    Schema Structured Data is a universal semantic vocabulary used by Google, Bing, Yandex, and Yahoo! It allows the search engines to read the data on your site on another level and return it in a more meaningful way the on results page. This screenshot shows how much information you get just by looking at these product cards:

    In this example there is an image, model series, ratings, and category. You might also see price, availability, product description and much more. Basically, you explicitly tell the search engines what types of information you have. But how does this benefit you? There are two main ways:

    • Higher rankings – as you know, the goal of search engines is to serve the most relevant search results to a user’s query. If you help them make sense of your data, they can easier evaluate the relevance of your page and, theoretically, rank you higher
    • More traffic – you get the advantage of showing more information at the very first stage of searching. Which means that you will more likely attract users to your site. It’s been known for a while now that features snippets get a lot of traffic

    If you check the full tree of elements of schema.org, you will see that there are countless possibilities. It’s quite easy to get overwhelmed by them. You need to focus on things that really matter in your business and highlight them with the mark-up.

    Final thoughts

    Mobile search is an important trend in SEO and its future. If you don’t want to fall behind, you need to make sure you address every aspect of it properly. Start with the technical part and check your site’s responsiveness on mobile both manually and using specialised tools, like Device Toolbar in Chrome.

    Then, test how handy your site is. You might discover some issues with fonts, pop-ups that you want to work on. AMP is a cutting-edge solution to slow mobile speed. You should at least consider it but keep in mind that it’s not perfect yet. Additionally, it’s worth going through the list of possible factors that can cause issues with loading speed. Like hosting, minified files, cache, etc.

    Finally, schema structured data is a great way to enhance the look of your search results and generate more traffic. This is not something you can ignore if you take your business seriously.

    At Artemis, we are specialists in optimising for mobile search and if you are interested in learning more please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us today.

    The post Five things to consider when optimising for mobile search appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    Meta description FAQs – 5 things everyone wants to know

    We see them every day on Google’s search results pages: meta tags – the title tag that specifies the title of a web page, and the meta description underneath. But what exactly is a meta description? Is it important to have one and how do you write a good one? These and other questions pop […] The post Meta description FAQs – 5 things everyone wants to know appeared first on Artemis...

    We see them every day on Google’s search results pages: meta tags – the title tag that specifies the title of a web page, and the meta description underneath. But what exactly is a meta description? Is it important to have one and how do you write a good one?

    These and other questions pop up with regularity among SEO enthusiasts, both beginners and those who should really know better. Let’s take a closer look on the 5 questions everyone seems to be asking to see if we can shed some light.

    FAQ 1: What is a meta description?

    Meta descriptions are a fundamental part of successful website optimisation. It’s the first snippet of text that you see in search results, below the page title, and should provide a short summary description of the content on your site. When you type a search query into Google, the search engine will show the meta description on the results page including the keyword you used in your search.

    Example:

     

     

     

    FAQ 2: Why do you need a meta description?

    The short answer is that it’s good SEO practice to have effective meta descriptions on each of your web pages. While Google is adamant that meta descriptions don’t actually affect search engine rankings, they are still an extremely useful tool to help drive traffic to your site.

    In fact, the whole point of a meta description is to give the user a good reason to click through to your site. A good description will give an overview of what the page is about and be written in an appealing way so that the user wants to find out more. Given the competitive nature of online marketing, a well written meta description may make all the difference between web traffic going to your page, or to a competitor page.

    FAQ 3: How long is a meta description?

    In theory, a meta description can be any length but do bear in mind that if it’s too short, the description you give may not be useful enough, and if it’s too long, Google may truncate your snippet. It’s not an exact science and Google likes to increase or decrease the limit now and again while conceding that, in fact, ‘there is no fixed length for snippets. Length varies based on what our systems deem to be most useful.’

    At Artemis, our best practice is to write meta descriptions that are just under 155 characters long, making sure the most important messages are communicated with the first 120 characters just in case the displayed snippet does get truncated.

    Example:

    FAQ 4: How do you write a good meta description?

    In order to convince someone to click through to your page from organic search results, you only have a short snippet of text to convey the right messages, which is why it’s worth putting in the effort to craft good copy for every unique meta description. Think of it as the equivalent of writing ad copy for Google Adwords for Pay-Per-Click.

    While the content of each meta description must accurately reflect the content of the page it points to, it should be written in a compelling fashion to appeal to the reader, generate interest in your page and ultimately increase click through rates.

    See if you can tell the difference between a ‘good’ and ‘bad’ meta description in these two examples:

     

     

     

     

     

     

    FAQ 5: What are some top tips for writing a meta description?

    So, how do you put all the above into action when it comes to writing your own meta descriptions? Commercial content writers use these top 5 tips and tricks of the trade to create great copy, including irresistible meta descriptions.

    1. Write for people, not for bots – meta descriptions are primarily aimed at the user, not the search engine. While it’s important to include the main keyword(s) in the copy, don’t stuff your description full of them – it looks spammy and will put people off. Instead, make your description informative and easy to read, written by humans and for humans in an effort to get them to engage with the snippet and click through to your site.

    2. Include structured content – for product pages in particular, users will be looking for information such as a detailed item description, technical spec, optional extras and, of course, price. It is highly likely that a click through to your website will be triggered by this highly relevant structured content rather than persuasive advertising copy, so make sure it is included in the meta description.

    3. Feature rich snippets – you can increase the appeal of your meta descriptions by adding additional information such as star ratings or customer ratings, product details, events and much more, using the latest schema markup code. If you’re not familiar with the concept, ask your SEO consultant to explain how this can enrich the information displayed in search results.

    4. Use an active voice – advertising copy is always aimed directly at the readers, with the ultimate intention to get them to do something (e.g. make a purchase). Rather than providing factual but dull information, write in an active, direct voice using imperatives (‘read this’, ‘click that’), giving clear direction towards clicking on the title tag.

    5. Don’t forget the call-to-action – the ultimate aim of your meta description is to drive click-throughs to your site, so the more compelling the reason given to the user to do just that, the more successful your meta description will be. ‘Find out more’, ‘Read our blog’, ‘Book a free consultation’, ‘Shop the sale’, ‘Buy now’ are all important calls to action inviting the user to visit your website for a specific purpose.

    The post Meta description FAQs – 5 things everyone wants to know appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    5 things to expect from a finance role in an SEO company

    I joined Artemis as Finance Supervisor in September 2017 – it was my first time working in an SEO company, and there were a few things I found quite different from my experience in other finance roles. If you are thinking of taking your skills in finance into digital marketing here are five things you […] The post 5 things to expect from a finance role in an SEO company appeared first on Artemis...

    I joined Artemis as Finance Supervisor in September 2017 – it was my first time working in an SEO company, and there were a few things I found quite different from my experience in other finance roles. If you are thinking of taking your skills in finance into digital marketing here are five things you can expect from a role with an SEO company.

    1. No Paper

    Gone are the days where every sales and purchase invoice are printed on paper. There may still be companies using reams and reams but when you work for a digital marketing and SEO company, there is no paper anywhere! Of course, this means you need to make sure that your IT department is top notch as they will need to ensure your files are secure.

    2. Cloud Accounting Software

    There are lots of accounting software around but cloud-based technology is the only way for a progressive SEO company. All your financial reports, bank reconciliations, receivable and payable lists are safely stored in the cloud. This also means you can work from home or even login on your phone with some apps!

    3. No more manual

    How many sales invoices can you raise in a day? It’s irrelevant now, with automatically generated recurring invoices every month the need for high volume data entry is less important now. Most SEO companies invoice based on ongoing monthly work so there is less chance of error if you are billing the same every month – just make sure you get it right at the start!

    4. Spreadsheets

    Every self-respecting finance professional should know how to use spreadsheets. This is especially true working for an SEO company which constantly requires data analysis. Make sure you know your pivot tables!

    5. Fun Atmosphere

    Finance has a reputation for being boring, mundane and repetitive. But this is not the case at all when you work in an SEO company. From banter with the account managers to team building days and Netflix in the kitchen at lunch, it can make for a really fun and exciting work atmosphere.

    Of course, SEO businesses require skills from many other industries. If you’re interested in working for Artemis, check out our careers page for current vacancies.

    The post 5 things to expect from a finance role in an SEO company appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


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